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Quick question - am I allowed to go in when I'm on maternity leave?

(6 Posts)
PrincessOfWails Mon 27-Jun-11 11:54:56

I work at an University, and my mat leave started last week, but I haven't had the baby yet. Am I allowed to go into my office, and go into the library and stuff like that? Because I'm still doing research.

Grevling Mon 27-Jun-11 12:34:57

Speak to your employer. Technically they don't have to allow it but I can't see them saying no.

Chippychop Tue 05-Jul-11 21:16:12

It's probably a h&s thing so check out with hr. Also better make it clear you don't expect to be paid

Chippychop Tue 05-Jul-11 21:18:12

It's probably a h&s thing so check out with hr. Also better make it clear you don't expect to be paid

JollySergeantJackrum Tue 05-Jul-11 21:24:28

From http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Parents/Moneyandworkentitlements/WorkAndFamilies/Pregnancyandmaternityrights/DG_175088

Keeping in touch

During your leave it is often helpful to keep in touch with your employer.

Your employer is entitled to make reasonable contact with you during Statutory Maternity Leave. This might be to update you on any significant changes in the workplace, including any opportunities for promotion or job vacancies.

You can work up to ten days' during your Statutory Maternity Leave without losing your Statutory Maternity Pay, Maternity Allowance or ending your leave. These are called keeping in touch days - and may only be worked if both you and your employer agree. You cannot work during compulsory maternity leave which is the two weeks immediately after your child is born.

Although particularly useful for things such as training or team events, keeping in touch days may be used for any form of work. They should make it easier for you to return to work after your leave.

You will need to agree with your employer what work is to be done on keeping in touch days and how much pay you will receive.

JollySergeantJackrum Tue 05-Jul-11 21:24:58

Redone link: www.direct.gov.uk/en/Parents/Moneyandworkentitlements/WorkAndFamilies/Pregnancyandmaternityrights/DG_175088

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