Talk

Advanced search

dd1 got told off for having choclolate in her packed lunch but it was yoghurt covered fruit flakes!

(26 Posts)
misdee Thu 02-Jun-05 16:14:02

feel a bit peed off that they told her off and didnt speak to me about it. i did make a mistake at first with her packed lunches when i put choccie digestives in there as i didnt know about the no choclate rule. but i had put toghurt fruit flakes in there thinking they were ok. arrrgh!!

just feel really peed off as IMO chocolate is better than some of the sweets people put in their packed lunches. would they kick up the same fuss if i put a mini bag of haribo in there?

Aimsmum Thu 02-Jun-05 16:17:46

Message withdrawn

Aimsmum Thu 02-Jun-05 16:17:47

Message withdrawn

sparklymieow Thu 02-Jun-05 16:17:49

isn't she on halfterm??

Aimsmum Thu 02-Jun-05 16:19:02

Message withdrawn

misdee Thu 02-Jun-05 16:19:42

yes she is mieow, but i only got her lunch bag out from uner the buggy today. lucky trhere was no manky food in there lol.

its 'school policy' apparently about the chocolate. i understand the reason behind it as its considered 'junk' but they were fruit flakes. if the teacher had bothered to look at the packet she would've seen they said yoghurt coated.

sparklymieow Thu 02-Jun-05 16:25:52

I know that DS's school doesn't allow chocolate either and they are only allow fruit bars or fruit

nutcracker Thu 02-Jun-05 16:29:25

If you are sending her lunch then I would say it is entirly up to you what you put in her lunch bag. I would be very very mad.

I mean the kids on dinners have chocolate pudding don't they.

Pinotmum Thu 02-Jun-05 16:51:22

I'd do what Aimsmum suggests and stick a note in sying this is a yoghurt bar not a chocolate bar

lisalisa Thu 02-Jun-05 16:59:02

Message withdrawn

Twiglett Thu 02-Jun-05 17:01:45

yogurt coated fruit flakes are probably just as high in sugar as chocolate

and if they aren't allowed chocolate but are allowed sweets is it cos choc melts over hands and clothes and yogurt coating will do the same

just trying to work out the reasons behind it

misdee Thu 02-Jun-05 17:49:36

they allow the school bars, fruit twirlers things etc, but not chcoclate. the yoghurt coating is a very small amount. think of chocolate coated raisens, they are that size.

i feel more peed off that they told dd off rather than approach me. the note says 'as part of out healthy eating policy the school does not allow chocolate for snacks and discourages its inclusion in lunch boxes. we would ask for your support in this matter'.


makes me laugh, as i removed dd1 from school dinners as she was having allergic reactions, and they were serving up the stuff on jamies school dinners. at least now she is having a sandwich, an orange, carton of juice, a plain biscuit and the fruit flakes, (which is freeze dried fruit by the looks of it). before she was having chicken things, hoops, smiles/chips and jelly/cake.

starlover Thu 02-Jun-05 17:51:29

that's ridiculous... they can't BAN chocolate! it's up to you what you give your child.

the fact that they say they "discourage" it just shows that they know they can't ban it outright... in which case they shouldn't even comment.

argh.. that would make me SO angry!

weesaidie Thu 02-Jun-05 18:44:37

I am mad too!

Healthy eating is all fair and well but it is the parents choice what a child eats not the schools!

And they allow sweets? How is that fair?

Grrrr.

Ellbell Thu 02-Jun-05 20:02:35

My dd's school has a no sweets, no crisps policy, which I must say I agree with. If no-one has these things then no-one's child should be coming home saying 'I want xxx because so-and-so had it', and I think that it shows that the school takes the idea of healthy eating seriously. They are not allowed to take drinks either. They just get water provided. (I think they try hard with the cooked lunches too, but my dd wouldn't contemplate the idea of eating them, so have no experience of that!) However, my dd has taken those fruit flake things (with and without the yogurt coating) and no-one has said anything. However, on her birthday I let her take a piece of birthday cake (home-made sponge cake - no shaving foam cream and inch-thick icing) and she said that she 'wasn't allowed' to eat it! I was mildly annoyed at that, but just assumed it was an over-zealous dinner-lady who'd said something about not really being meant to have cake (though we were only told about crisps and sweets) and dd (being only just 5) didn't like to question it.

Ellbell Thu 02-Jun-05 20:02:36

My dd's school has a no sweets, no crisps policy, which I must say I agree with. If no-one has these things then no-one's child should be coming home saying 'I want xxx because so-and-so had it', and I think that it shows that the school takes the idea of healthy eating seriously. They are not allowed to take drinks either. They just get water provided. (I think they try hard with the cooked lunches too, but my dd wouldn't contemplate the idea of eating them, so have no experience of that!) However, my dd has taken those fruit flake things (with and without the yogurt coating) and no-one has said anything. However, on her birthday I let her take a piece of birthday cake (home-made sponge cake - no shaving foam cream and inch-thick icing) and she said that she 'wasn't allowed' to eat it! I was mildly annoyed at that, but just assumed it was an over-zealous dinner-lady who'd said something about not really being meant to have cake (though we were only told about crisps and sweets) and dd (being only just 5) didn't like to question it.

Ellbell Thu 02-Jun-05 20:03:47

Aaargh! Sorry for double posting.

wordsmith Thu 02-Jun-05 20:07:26

Think chocolate is a lot better than some of the processed mush kids get for school dinners IMO

misdee Thu 02-Jun-05 20:08:00

my thoughts exactly wordsmith.

Jimjams Fri 03-Jun-05 13:34:42

the healthy eating initiative is a govt thing. It was a bloody nghtmare when ds1 was in mainstream as he won't eat fruit etc. So he was starving, disrupting everyone and wasn't allowed to eat the food he will eat. Luckily there's none of this nonsense in his special school.

I think someone's interpreted them as sweets misdee. Put a note in and see what happens.

Nanny state? Yes indeed!

lucy5 Fri 03-Jun-05 14:11:25

At my dds school they have fruity friday, when only fruit is allowed for their snacks. Friday is the only day she eats all her fruit. They are quite relaxed on other days.

titchy Fri 03-Jun-05 16:31:29

That's funny Lucy5 - at our school it's 'Fish Finger Friday'! Must say fruity friday sounds a lot healthier

swedishmum Fri 03-Jun-05 18:06:22

It's chip day on Friday here and the catering co encourage children to join in for that day only!!
Dd's class had a competition at one point to see who could have the most fruit and veg per week - dd got stomach ache as she sneaked in extra stuff.
Also some of the dinner ladies insist you have your sandwich first. Other dd - 10 - was told off for taking a chicken caesar salad, and dd 8 took mini kebabs sometimes or breadsticks and healthy dips as she won't eat sandwiches except nutella and economy white bread. They'd prefer her to have yucky unhealthy stuff instead so she conforms. Just for a laugh they made sushi and took it in instead. School lunchtimes can just be so vile.

WedgiesMum Tue 07-Jun-05 21:07:24

Hope you've got it sorted woth school misdee, seems a bit heavy handed to me. Have you spoken to them about it??

On the subject of stuff with nuts in them though can I add something? Nut free zones are generally for a reason (ie a child/adult with an allergy) things packed/produced in an environment where nut products also are packed/produced can contain traces of nut (airborne dust particles for example that). This is often enough to cause an extreme allergic reaction. Kids often share food at lunch and break times and even the touch of a child who has touched a 'nut bearing' product can set opf a reaction in some. Often the only way of ensuring that they are safe from this hazard os to ban it altogether. HTH.

misdee Tue 07-Jun-05 21:09:05

spoke to dd1 teacher. she says the fruit flakes are fine, if anyone else tells her off for having them then she has tpo tell her teacher.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now