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scrap SATs reponse from No10

(15 Posts)
southeastastra Sat 12-Jul-08 12:39:07

The Government is committed to national tests at the end of the first three key stages. These tests measure the attainment of all children against standards that are nationally comparable, ensure that schools are held accountable for children's progress, and give parents the information they need to exercise real choice for their children.

The principle purpose of national tests is to provide an accurate measure of attainment for every pupil who, with teachers' own assessments, helps schools to ensure that every child progresses and achieves their best. Tests focus on the core subjects of English, mathematics and science as these hold the key to future success in school, lifelong learning and the world of work. We want every child to be taught the core subjects in the context of a broad and rich curriculum.

Children, like adults, thrive with an appropriate balance of pressure and support. Pressure should be neither too intense nor too prolonged. Teachers and parents can do much to prevent tests becoming stressful for children.

so looks like they're here to stay

Cammelia Sat 12-Jul-08 12:41:13

Both Gordon Brown and David Cameron are sending their dc's to state school this September.

I will watch to see which of them changes to private school first.

SqueakyPop Sat 12-Jul-08 12:42:12

I don't think there's anything wrong with the tests (they are actually very well written) - it's what the schools do with them, and pressure from the LEAs, that are the problems.

Gobbledigook Sat 12-Jul-08 12:57:59

'The principle purpose of national tests is to provide an accurate measure of attainment for every pupil'

Hmmm, well, going back to the other thread, I know parents in ds1's year that have 'coached' their children through KS1 SATs and offered big rewards for good results.

ARghghghghghghghghgh!

ihatebikerides Sat 12-Jul-08 18:12:21

"These tests measure the attainment of all children against standards that are nationally comparable".... hmmm, yes, well they might, if only they were marked accurately and sent back to schools on time.

Lucycat Sat 12-Jul-08 18:19:53

Well they aren't here to stay at all....at least not in their current form;

'The Department for Children, Schools and Families is piloting a possible replacement in the form of "single level tests" that children would take to confirm their teachers' assessment that they had reached a higher national curriculum attainment level.

this is a quote from a BBC news report on the 4th July. These single level tests have been piloted at our secondary school and insider knowledge tells me that the papers have already been written for them!

RustyBear Sat 12-Jul-08 18:30:29

Is that a direct cut & paste from the response, sea?

janeite Sat 12-Jul-08 18:31:30

I think you should lose the "S" from the thread title.

I hate the way they try to justify SATs by saying that they provide parental choice.

southeastastra Sat 12-Jul-08 18:32:54

yes it is, from the petition, apologies for the thread title typo.

janeite Sat 12-Jul-08 18:34:23

No - I meant lose the "S" from "scrap"!

southeastastra Sat 12-Jul-08 18:35:23

lol was wondering what you meant, realise i spelt response wrongly. i'd be no good at SATs obviously

RustyBear Sat 12-Jul-08 18:36:27

Oh good, then I can mock the grammar!

"The principle purpose of national tests is to provide an accurate measure of attainment"

No it isn't, though the principal purpose may be...

mrz Sat 12-Jul-08 19:33:22

Lucycat did you see the BBC programmes about SATs? The school featured that was piloting the new tests said they were even worse than SATs ... news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/panorama/7396156.stm

Lucycat Sat 12-Jul-08 19:52:30

yes I did, we are a secondary school and the NFER came in to do the tests with some classes, the teachers weren't allowed into the classrooom or to even see the tests.

all very hush hush

I must admit though, i do like the idea that once a child has achieved a level they never have to resit that level again, they simply wait until their teacher feels that they are ready to sit the next test - that may be a couple of years. - and they have 3 chances a year to sit the test.

AMumInScotland Mon 14-Jul-08 09:27:17

"single level tests that children would take to confirm their teachers' assessment that they had reached a higher national curriculum attainment level"

That sounds pretty much like what we have up here! Ages 5 to 14 are covered by Levels A to F in maths, reading, writing, science, etc. Each child (or more usually a group) sits a test when the teacher decides they are ready - here it can be any time, not just at three points in the year - and if they pass then they start working towards the next level. The children are often not even that aware they are sitting a "level test" rather than just a classroom test, and parents often don't know about it until the end of term report - suddenly your child is "working towards level C in maths".

It fulfils what the tests are supposed to be for - checking that individual children and teachers and schools are achieving what they ought to be - but without a lot of stress.

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