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Secondary school application........

(13 Posts)
1805 Thu 11-Oct-12 23:19:17

having second thoughts about this idea morally......

Around us, there is only one secondary school I would be happy for dc to attend. We are not in the catchment for it. DC currently in private schools, which is a struggle, but fine.

I have just filled out the LEA form putting the school as first choice. Now I'm worrying that if ds is given a place in out catchment school instead (which I would not accept) are we taking away a place from another family unfairly? If this happened, dc would stay in private school. I suppose I am applying to my first choice school, purely on the off-chance he is given a place.

Is this a really bad thing to do?

Startailoforangeandgold Thu 11-Oct-12 23:21:37

Look at another way, you'll make the first person on the waiting list very happy.

AngelEyes46 Thu 11-Oct-12 23:34:36

There is so much movement so do not worry. I think as long as you don't hold onto two places you're not doing anything morally wrong.

annh Thu 11-Oct-12 23:52:19

I'm confused, if you get a place at your catchment school, you will turn it down so you're not taking a place away from anyone there? If you happen to get a place at your out-of-catchment school, you will accept it? Do you feel that because you could possibly continue to pay for private school that this place could go to someone more deserving? If so, put that thought out of your head! Otherwise, where would you stop?! If you have private health insurance, would you feel that you should always use it rather than using NHS facilities sometimes?

prh47bridge Fri 12-Oct-12 00:03:23

I don't see how you think you would be taking a place from another family unfairly. You are entitled to whatever place the LA offer you. If you reject the offered place they will offer it to whoever is at the head of the waiting list. That is probably going to be the family who would have been offered it if you hadn't applied at all.

This is definitely not a bad thing to do in any way as far as I can see.

tiggytape Fri 12-Oct-12 08:05:45

Agree with the others. You are not cheating the system or trying to gain any unfair advantage. If you get offered a place, it will be because you qualify for it.

If it helps a lot of people in your position do this. We live in an area where it is possible to commute to the London Super-Selective Grammars - the top performing schools around but seriously hard to get into (they take the top 6% or so).
People apply from private schools. If they pass they take the place. If they don't pass (or pass with no offer) they stay at private school. They have no intention of taking the local comp offered by the council instead. This is just as well actually because if they did, there wouldn't be enough comp spaces to go round!

You pay taxes, you aren't lying about your address, you are applying fairly and willing to accept the outcome whatever that may be so you have as much right as anyone else to ask for a place at the school you like.

Blu Fri 12-Oct-12 09:35:15

I don't understand your OP - why would you be taking a place unfairly if you decline a place in your local catchment school? Or indeed if you are lucky and get a place in your first choice school? You will only be offered a place in your foirst choice school if you meet the admission criteria, same as everyone else.

LittenTree Fri 12-Oct-12 12:09:15

I think what the OP means, Blu is 'Is it morally wrong to accept the good state school place if it's offered seeing as we can (just) afford private, where the DC is at present? Could that be seen as depriving another DC of that state place, one who maybe doesn't have the 'private' option to fall back on?'

Blu Fri 12-Oct-12 13:49:54

Oh, I see!

Good heavens, as a parent who cannot afford private and has a child at a highly over-subscribed good comp, no I see nothing immoral about this at all. Everyone is entitled to choose a state education!

1805 Fri 12-Oct-12 14:52:41

Blu - so you wouldn't feel upset if we bumped your child out of the good 'out-of-catchment' school, or if you ended up on the waiting list for your catchment area school?
I think the term "unfairly" that I used was wrong. We are not fiddling the application in any way whatsoever. I just feel a bit cheeky being so picky.
We'll probably not get a place anyway, so I don't know why I'm worrying.
x

tiggytape Fri 12-Oct-12 15:04:33

I think it is normal to feel upset if you don't get a place at any of the schools you'd like. But nobody feels upset with other parents about it (unless those parents have lied on their form or cheated in some way to get an advantage) - it is the shortage of places and the system that is at fault.

I know some people who are, or were, at private primary schools because they missed out on getting a school of their choice when their children were 5 (they lived marginally too far from their closest schools and were allocated one miles away that was hard to get to). I don't think anyone would say that being at private school and being able to afford it also means they should be last in line for secondary allocations. If you make a genuine application and meet the criteria then that is fair enough.

Blu Fri 12-Oct-12 15:33:50

If it was a school that admitted on distance, you would live nearer than me anyway to get in! I would be upset not to get a place in my nearest good school, of course, but that should hardly undermine the principle that the school is there for anyone and everyone who can meet the admission criteria within the available places.

If you had played the system, rented a temporary house in catchment or used your mother's boyfriend's dog-sitter's address to apply from, I would be on the warpath!

1805 Fri 12-Oct-12 19:08:23

"mother's boyfriend's dog-sitter's address" LOL!

Ok, I shall feel sheepish no longer. As I said, it's very unlikely ds will get a place anyway.

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