Advertisement

loader

Talk

Advanced search

Studying while pregnant/with a young child?

(9 Posts)
Lorrainbow Tue 30-Aug-11 20:39:50

Hello,

I was supposed to start a part-time distance learning masters on September 26th but turns out I'm 6 weeks pregnant with my first child!

I work full time at the moment.

The course is two years long. I'm not sure what to do about it.
I'm going to get in touch with the university and see what options they have, like doing a few modules each year... but I just can't see myself having the time in the next two or even three years?!

Anyone have experience of studying with a young child/whilst pregnant?

Thank you,
L

Nagoo Wed 31-Aug-11 07:45:11

I did OU law while pg and then final exams when DS was tiny. I got a first

It's ok while baby very small as they nap. This is provided you don't have anything else to do, like other children, or work.

You've probably timed it pretty well, 9m pg so you'll be finishing the academic year when baby due. Then Mat leave so you'll maybe be able to do a bit then?

I'd still do it.

In any case don't make decisions yet, it's very early days.

vanfurgston Wed 31-Aug-11 08:09:51

my friend is doing her law degree too with 2 young children (3 yrs , 6 month old) altho its quite demanding and i dnt knw how she is managing she is doing quite well at uni.

Fiolondon Wed 31-Aug-11 09:37:00

Hi
I've done a part time masters alongside work and have since had children. I've also written a book. I would not consider doing either of these with a baby in tow as you just don't know what sort of baby you are going to get. If you want to breastfeed, you will not have much time to anything else in the early months even if they nap a lot as you will need to catch up on sleep and then later you could spend a lot of time trying to get the baby to go to sleep when it is determined not to! On top of that there is weaning and I had no idea how much time and brain power babies absorb and found becoming a mother (first time) a difficult transition - not least because my son had reflux and screamed/vomitted constantly..... Most babies are not like that but they are all time consuming and you have very little time to think about yourself, never mind essay deadlines. Unless you are bottle feeding and can/want to hand off your child to someone else to look after you will need to be superwoman to make a good job of the course. Remember that most babies' biological clocks have only deveoped by about 40 weeks/10 months to allow a full night of sleep. So for some women this means trying to go back to work on broken nights - tough in itself! Unless your family can help you out/move in with you, and your course will bring immediate tangible benefits, then i would suggest deferring. Sorry if that sounds gloomy but there is no point beating about the bush.... a young child, a job and a course will be the hardest juggling act you will ever do. Does your partner have a view on how little time will be left for him? Some OHs get humpy enough with the arrival of a baby....
Good luck!

Fiolondon Wed 31-Aug-11 09:39:54

Sorry meant to say: "on top of that there is weaning and finding childcare, then settling in time."
You need to work out whether the benefit of the course will be worth the cost, stress and hard work for you.

beadedbalaclava Thu 01-Sep-11 10:08:52

I did a BSc full time with a baby - I got pg in the year before I started but was able to start the course when DD was 3 weeks old. It was hard work, but I had a fantastic childminder and I always tended to study at night, so staying up late wasn't too different anyway.

I did very well and continued to do an MSc - my only regret really is that it took up so much time and emotional energy in my DD's early years. I missed her a lot when she was in childcare and it meant I couldn't do regular things with her like swimming, Surestart etc. Looking back, I would have preferred being there for her milestones even if it meant I didn't achieve as much as I did. Those are my values though and I suppose many women have to spend time away from their babies at work anyway (if I hadn't been studying I'd have just been at home with her).

AberdeenAngusina Thu 08-Sep-11 10:15:33

I did a 30 credit OU module while working full-time and preg. Then I did the OU foundation course while preg/ with new baby, 60 credit course as a SAHM with toddler and preg again, started a 30 credit course with toddler and 2nd baby but gave up, restarted the following year and by the time I graduated I was preg again. I got a 2.1.

Breast feeding is better than bottle because it leaves you a hand free to hold a book, make notes, etc. Part of the reason I breast fed the DCs past their first birthday was because bf guaranteed me time to sit down! As DH couldn't help with the feeding, he got to do non-book friendly baby care.

I thought it was perfect for me; I got to be a SAHM, which is what I wanted to be, but felt I was doing something which would ultimately further my career at the same time.

My mother would tell you though, that my standards of housework were very low indeed.

eaglewings Thu 08-Sep-11 10:19:50

Have done a distance course which finished when dd2 was 6 weeks old and DS was 3. I did not work at the same time though.

Tortu Sun 11-Sep-11 20:35:16

I was halfway through my course when I got pregnant. I finished the module I'd started but it was really hard- I think, because my pregnancy was so difficult.

I've found that I've had loads of time since having my baby though as they do nap. I would have appreciated more, actually, as I felt like my brain was stagnating.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now