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Prolapse in Alzheimers

(9 Posts)
sohackedoff Tue 12-Jul-16 19:31:02

My mum was diagnosed 5 years ago with Alzheimer's. Recently suffered vaginal prolapse dealt with by inserting a shelf pessary. All very traumatic as she doesn't understand any of it. District Nurse now turning up nightly to insert hormone cream into her vagina. Again, doesn't understand. Screaming. Shouting. Refusing. What can we do? District Nurse isn't going to put up with this every evening for the next fortnight and then every other evening for the next fortnight. Amy advice please?

VioletBam Wed 13-Jul-16 11:21:28

District Nurse MUST put up with it! It's not for you to worry about that. It is distressing for your Mother and the nurses' job is to deal with that. Kindly and patiently.

Has the nurse been huffing and complaining? You're having enough on your plate without worrying about the nurse putting up with her job!

I'm sorry your Mum and you are going through this. flowers

CMOTDibbler Wed 13-Jul-16 11:42:31

I know how hard it is as my mum has dementia as well, and when she had thrush she really was confused by the treatment and resisted strongly.

But the district nurse's job is to get people to co-operate and deliver the treatment they need, so try not to worry about their feelings. Goodness knows what the lovely nurses that deal with my parents put up with!

sohackedoff Wed 13-Jul-16 18:16:00

Thank you. District Nurse has now refused to deal with her.

Nospringflower Wed 13-Jul-16 18:21:51

If it's a necessary medical treatment they need to find a way of managing this and it's not your responsibility.

If your mother is incapable of making decisions about her medical treatment (which it sounds like she is) then there should be an incapacity certificate in place (might be different wording in England) and this gives people the right to treat against their will.

How they do it can be difficult and it will depend on the treatment but for serious issues can be giving a GA to allow whatever procedure needs done.

Are you able to speak to your mother's GP?

Sorry it must be really difficult for you and distressing for everyone but please don't think it is for you to manage your mother's confused response.

VioletBam Thu 14-Jul-16 02:29:29

So what alternative have they offered? It's their responsibility! My friend is a district nurse and she has dealt with very upsetting things and she's never once left a patient high and dry! Seems very unprofessional to me.

Of course a patient with your Mother's issues will be upset...and yes even violent or hard to treat but this is a fact of nursing!

She's a vulnerable woman and they need to sort it out. I do hope you're not too upset OP...are they communicating with you properly?

DementedUnicorn Thu 14-Jul-16 02:49:14

The DN should not be refusing to attempt treatment. Every day is different with Alzheimer's which she should know so she should be trying every day at the very least.

MUjunkie Thu 14-Jul-16 02:55:39

My MIL has this...personally I feel like the system doesn't give a toss, there is no help, they tell us she needs certain tests and referring for different appointments but 2 years down the line there is nothing!

I know it's awful for your DM but maybe the saving grace is that she may not remember the stress of it for long.

You have my best wishes, hugs, support OP! It's the hardest thing to deal with!

PollyPerky Sun 17-Jul-16 21:20:24

Is there any way your mum can help herself with this? Does she have times of the day when she is more lucid? I'm wondering too how essential it is to use this cream. (I use it as a post menopausal woman!) It won't cure her prolapse though might make her slightly more comfortable. There is another product which is the same - Vagifem- which is a tiny pellet in a small applicator. Might that be a better option and is there any way your mum could use it herself? I can see that having this fairly 'invasive' procedure is no fun for your mum at all. Have you asked why she has to have this cream?

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