DS won't drink out of the same cup

(23 Posts)
Lifestooshort1542 Thu 19-Nov-20 13:26:35

Since Covid I have wondered what effect this will have on our kids ie don't touch that wash your hands sanitise all the time virus germs etc etc.
Recently I've noticed DS 3.5 won't drink out of a cup of I've had a sip. And today I bought him and ice cream and licked it to stop it running and he wouldn't eat it after that.
Do you think this is something to be concerned about or is just a phase?
It really made me sad as it made me wonder what this is all doing to o it kids although we try to not go into too much detail about Covid kids still pick up things from the news and what they hear etc.

OP’s posts: |
halcyondays Thu 19-Nov-20 13:29:56

If he goes to nursery he’s probably been told, quite rightly, that children are to eat their own food and drink and not share with anyone else.

Not sure why you had to take a sip from his drink.

Rainallnight Thu 19-Nov-20 13:30:55

I think at that age you’re more or less in control of what he sees/hears, so you can make every attempt possible to dial down the anxiety. It’s different with older kids who can watch the news and have friends at school winding them up. But we really, really soft pedal it with our four year old DD.

picklemewalnuts Thu 19-Nov-20 13:31:27

Apparently research now says that dental decay is from a bacteria that we pass to our children. If we don't taste their food, share their cup etc we can help their teeth stay good longer. I was shocked at that.

OpheliasCrayon Thu 19-Nov-20 13:32:22

halcyondays

If he goes to nursery he’s probably been told, quite rightly, that children are to eat their own food and drink and not share with anyone else.

Not sure why you had to take a sip from his drink.

I always take a sip from my kids drinks - either if it's a carton I have a bit so when they pick it up it's not totally full and splatters everywhere, or often I'll pour a cup again too full and drink a bit so they don't spill loads.

Anyway. Aside the point ...

Backbee Thu 19-Nov-20 13:32:23

I don't think it's negative unless it's distressed by it or it's affecting him. I don't think it's a particularly bad thing tbh, hopefully you will see less bugs as he grows up (wishful thinking probably).

OverTheRainbow88 Thu 19-Nov-20 13:32:30

Hmmm yea I wouldn’t want my 3.5 old to worry about that. Maybe ask nursery to tone it down .

My DS is 4 and I can’t imagine him not drinking from my drink or sharing food with myself and others.

Maybe nursery are pushing the hygiene too much, which can cause issues

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AvoidingRealHumans Thu 19-Nov-20 13:32:33

Both of my children (6&9) have gone through a phase of doing this and it was pre covid.
I also know of a load of other children doing it and actually remember it being a thing when I was at primary school.
I wouldn't worry just yet that it's covid related, they learn about germs and then get obsessed with other peoples germs (my experience of my own children anyway) it soon passed when there was something tasty on offer that had to be shared or out on a hot day and one had finished their water so needed some of their brothers.
Try not to give it any attention.

Lifestooshort1542 Thu 19-Nov-20 13:32:50

halcyondays

If he goes to nursery he’s probably been told, quite rightly, that children are to eat their own food and drink and not share with anyone else.

Not sure why you had to take a sip from his drink.


Not sure why you had to take a sip from his drink.

It was actually my drink at the dinner table that he decides he wanted some but then he asked 'what side did I drink out of' just made me think

OP’s posts: |
helpfulperson Thu 19-Nov-20 13:33:46

To be honest I wouldn't be doing that with a child at the moment. If either of you have covid that a very good route of transmission.

NoSquirrels Thu 19-Nov-20 13:35:45

One of my DC couldn’t care less, one is horrified by sharing food/drink/water bottles etc. This has been from quite young. So I do t necessarily think it’s a coronavirus thing?

Lifestooshort1542 Thu 19-Nov-20 13:37:28

Just to clarify I don't 'want him to drink from the same drink as me' it just concerned me that he was reacting like that because of all the increased hygiene and Covid measures.

OP’s posts: |
GreyishDays Thu 19-Nov-20 13:38:10

picklemewalnuts

Apparently research now says that dental decay is from a bacteria that we pass to our children. If we don't taste their food, share their cup etc we can help their teeth stay good longer. I was shocked at that.

Only if the mother has large untreated cavities though?

pastandpresent Thu 19-Nov-20 13:39:49

In my country, we are told not to share anything with children, so not to pass on the cavities. So, I never shared anything with my dc.

HotSince63 Thu 19-Nov-20 13:40:04

I clearly remember being aged 3 or 4 and my dad licking my ice-cream and me being absolutely repulsed by it - and getting a smack when I refused to then eat it myself.

My DS has been the same from a very young age, he wouldn't drink from the same cup, share a bottle of water, etc.

That was about 40 years pre-covid.

PrivateD00r Thu 19-Nov-20 13:42:52

To be fair, I wouldn''t be too happy if someone licked my ice cream or drank from my cup blush I really wouldn't be annoyed by this!

picklemewalnuts Thu 19-Nov-20 15:39:58

Really @GreyishDays ? That wasn't the impression I had.

thaegumathteth Thu 19-Nov-20 15:49:32

I honestly have never licked my kids ice cream or drank their drink . Maybe I have issues!

FreezeFloodlit Thu 19-Nov-20 15:49:36

When I was little, my mum always said family germs don't count. Obviously it's not strictly true, but helps to promote a relaxed attitude and there is some truth in it as families are likely to be sharing germs in any case even if they avoid sharing cups and food. I have a 3 year old and I kiss and hug him all the time and he kisses me. I assume you and your child have a similarly affectionate relationship, the same as most 3 year olds and their parents. When you're kissing each other and in frequent close physical contact there's no point worrying about cups.

I'd be worried about children developing germophobic tendencies as well.

GreyishDays Thu 19-Nov-20 15:49:41

picklemewalnuts

Really @GreyishDays ? That wasn't the impression I had.

There may have been more recent research, and haven’t looked at the original research paper, just this
www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.latimes.com/health/la-xpm-2011-jul-01-hk-he-tooth-decay-20110701-story.html%3f_amp=true

Which says:

Cavities are more complex than we thought. Sugar is still the leading culprit — and genetics, diet, immunity, susceptibility, oral hygiene and fluoride exposure play roles — but a large and growing body of research suggests that oral decay is also an infectious disease.

Numerous studies have found that cavity-causing bacteria can be passed from primary caregivers to infants and toddlers during a period in which the children’s immune systems are not fully developed — putting young children at a higher risk of cavities. Such transmission, called “vertical transmission,” is most likely from caregivers (usually mothers) with severe, untreated tooth decay.

Smelliethenelephant Thu 19-Nov-20 15:55:28

@FreezeFloodlit mine too! I would really try to play this down OP, I think germphobia and compulsive hygiene behaviours could potentially become issues for lots of kids after all this..

completeberk Thu 19-Nov-20 15:56:34

my dad and grandma used to spit onto their hanky and then use it to clean my face when I was a kid in the 70s grin

Smallwhiterat Thu 19-Nov-20 16:03:17

Quite honestly I wouldn’t eat a licked ice cream, no matter who licked it. From very very young just the idea has made me feel sick. Ditto sharing cups, cutlery, toothbrushes etc. It’s just yucky and unnecessary. I’d be concerned if they were becoming obsessive or anxious about germs, but simply following basic hygiene seems ok to me. If kids come out of the covid era with better hand washing, tissue and sneezing habits that will be a very good thing.

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