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Life after Covid

(25 Posts)
bunny85 Tue 27-Oct-20 09:45:27

I've been feeling increasingly anxious about what life will be like after this pandemic. I can't explain why but I have this terrible fear that people just won't go back to hugging/kissing friends to say hello, handshakes will be forever forgotten (or avoided), people will distance, work from home, there will be no cinemas or nightclubs as we know them. I fear for my children's future, will they know life as we know it? They are only little but already used to seeing masks, constant antibac gels, keeping distance, fear of the virus etc. I'm a very tactile and sociable person and I desperately want to know that we'll get our normal life back again. It doesn't matter when, as long as I know it will happen, I don't mind waiting. I'm just petrified that it may last so long that people simply won't go back to the old ways. Do you think this virus will change the way we live forever? I desperately hope not, and want to hear what others think. Thank you.

OP’s posts: |
Rabbitholebonkers Tue 27-Oct-20 09:52:35

I could have written that post. I’m happy to wait but I have this feeling that this is it now. Life really isn’t going to return to normal.

BefuddledPerson Tue 27-Oct-20 09:57:24

I understand your fears flowers

I don't worry about the specifics you raise though. I think positives that could come are:

- increased cleanliness/hand hygiene
- increased understanding of not spreading germs
- end of handshaking (I've actively avoided this for years as I think it is a bit gross)

But I think what will come back is closeness amongst friends and family. That is natural and won't die because we love each other smile

toolatetooearly Tue 27-Oct-20 10:31:03

Well it's not going to be exactly like THIS for ever. It wasn't even like this in July/August. But I don't think there's any question that life exactly as it was before March will return, that's gone. Who knows what's next? Might be better.

Fortherosesjoni70 Tue 27-Oct-20 10:44:26

People will forget. Its human nature.
I really wouldnt worry.

Fortherosesjoni70 Tue 27-Oct-20 10:44:57

Its not going to be like this forever. I agree.

Aragog Tue 27-Oct-20 10:46:39

Remember - this isn't the first pandemic the country/world have faced. We've had pandemics occur in the past. Eventually people will revert to normal - its human nature. Hence why most people are finding the restrictions difficult to live with - it's not normal for humans to avoid contact with one another long term.

Thatusernamewastaken Tue 27-Oct-20 10:49:16

Quite possibly. Especially with the story on BBC today that antibodies fall rapidly after infection.
Means that any vaccine, if it works, would potentially need administering every 6 months.

IcedPurple Tue 27-Oct-20 11:03:16

Do you think this virus will change the way we live forever?

No.

Mark Honigsbaum, a medical historian, has said that pandemics rarely lead to lasting changes unless there is a major demographic impact, which there won't be with Covid. There's also a strong tendency for people to overestimate the importance of the present in the long-term scheme of things.

It may well be the case that Covid speeds up trends which were already in place - more WFH, the further decline of the high street, perhaps less business travel. But the world is not likely to change permanently for a virus which will probably be well under control this time next year.

KnightsofColumbusThatHurt Tue 27-Oct-20 11:06:26

No, I think life will go back to normal eventually, which will unfortunately mean back to forced social hugging with people I don't really want to hug (my friends are real huggers which means when I see anyone and I am with them, we all have to do the hugging thing, noooo!)

Porcupineinwaiting Tue 27-Oct-20 11:13:29

Well, look at it this way: there have been far worse diseases and pandemics throughout the course of human history (plague anyone?) and none of those stopped people interacting normally long term. It's pretty difficult to get people to restrict their normal behaviours even for a few months, so fat chance of a long term shift.

Sunshinegirl82 Tue 27-Oct-20 11:28:04

Thatusernamewastaken

Quite possibly. Especially with the story on BBC today that antibodies fall rapidly after infection.
Means that any vaccine, if it works, would potentially need administering every 6 months.


This is not accurate.

Firstly, we have known for months that antibodies that result from natural infection decline quickly what we don't know (yet) is what that means for immunity. Antibodies are not the only immune mechanism the body has it's just that the others are much harder to test for.

Secondly, immunity from natural infection does not have a direct bearing on the immunity that will be generated by a vaccine. The Oxford vaccine is using an attenuated chimp adenovirus as a vector for example. Typically, the body produces a strong immune response to adenoviruses and accordingly the hope is that the immune response the vaccine will be significantly better than that produced by natural infection.

In answer to your question OP I think things will get back to normal much more quickly than you might think. The restrictions are contrary to human nature (which is why people are finding them hard and sometimes not complying with them). It won't be overnight but it won't take years either would be my guess.

BlanchflowerTulip Tue 27-Oct-20 12:08:41

I think you'll be surprised. Most of the positive stuff will snap back into place quicker than you expect, e.g. nightclubs, pubs, cinema. I agree with the view that we might end up with another "roaring twenties". That, of course, depends on the economy recovering relatively quickly, which given the total devastation that's currently being wrought is by no means guaranteed (or even likely).

Having said that, I'd be quite content to bin the whole hug and kiss nonsense. A firm handshake is quote sufficient.

Aragog Tue 27-Oct-20 12:10:15

Means that any vaccine, if it works, would potentially need administering every 6 months.

That's not quite right. Immunity from vaccines often work in different ways.

kittensarecute Tue 27-Oct-20 14:00:25

bunny85

I've been feeling increasingly anxious about what life will be like after this pandemic. I can't explain why but I have this terrible fear that people just won't go back to hugging/kissing friends to say hello, handshakes will be forever forgotten (or avoided), people will distance, work from home, there will be no cinemas or nightclubs as we know them. I fear for my children's future, will they know life as we know it? They are only little but already used to seeing masks, constant antibac gels, keeping distance, fear of the virus etc. I'm a very tactile and sociable person and I desperately want to know that we'll get our normal life back again. It doesn't matter when, as long as I know it will happen, I don't mind waiting. I'm just petrified that it may last so long that people simply won't go back to the old ways. Do you think this virus will change the way we live forever? I desperately hope not, and want to hear what others think. Thank you.

No. No no. This can't be it. Statements like that really don't do my mental health any good.

Juststopswimming Tue 27-Oct-20 14:16:35

IcedPurple

*Do you think this virus will change the way we live forever?*

No.

Mark Honigsbaum, a medical historian, has said that pandemics rarely lead to lasting changes unless there is a major demographic impact, which there won't be with Covid. There's also a strong tendency for people to overestimate the importance of the present in the long-term scheme of things.

It may well be the case that Covid speeds up trends which were already in place - more WFH, the further decline of the high street, perhaps less business travel. But the world is not likely to change permanently for a virus which will probably be well under control this time next year.

I agree with this. I think its very easy to get caught up in the present moment where everything feels very bleak, I have been feeling that a lot lately, it feels as though there is not much to look forward to.

I keep having to remind myself of how things felt reasonably normal over the summer months once we were allowed out again after the initial lockdown - it will be like that again. It really will!

And yes to the roaring twenties! You wont be able to stop me partying!

Cableknitskirt Tue 27-Oct-20 14:26:58

I'd be quite pleased for hugs and kissing to be less common as I don't like most people doing this to me but its rude not to accept these greetings. I am happy to hug my immediate family, my husband and best friend. A grand total of 5 people. I'd prefer if nobody else was touching me.

campion Tue 27-Oct-20 14:55:49

BefuddledPerson
I think positives that could come are:

-increased cleanliness/hand hygiene
- increased understanding of not spreading germs
- end of handshaking (I've actively avoided this for years as I think it is a bit gross)

I agree.
I also wouldn't miss social kissing/ hugs with people I hardly know - when did that become a thing? And I'll be more than happy if people can permanently curb their desire to cough during recitals/concerts/anything quiet.

IceCreamAndCandyfloss Tue 27-Oct-20 14:56:20

Not all of those things are bad. I have no desire to kiss friends and find it strange, better hygiene and natural distance will mean less bugs going round and wfh for many will save a car commute so better for the environment.

Businesses will adapt in the main or new ones will take their place.

We at least have numerous means of technology to keep in touch, plenty of things exist that keep adults and children amused/occupied in homes and online shopping etc.

Waxonwaxoff0 Tue 27-Oct-20 15:03:53

Life will go back to how it was, perhaps with more working from home.

The problem on MN is that a lot of people here are anti social and want to stay holed up in their homes never interacting with anyone so the view is skewed. Everyone I know in real life can't wait to be back socialising again!

Rabbitholebonkers Tue 27-Oct-20 15:25:57

@campion

I agree. I remember in December taking my daughter to our local panto. The lady directly in front spent the whole show coughing repeatedly.

I’m hoping things like that will be less frequent now. Disgusting pre covid, but really anti social now.

lunar1 Tue 27-Oct-20 15:31:02

I think we will mostly return to normal, but perhaps there will be less tolerance to people unnecessarily spreading illness. Our school has had the best attendance yet because sick children haven't been in school passing on their illnesses.

tentative3 Tue 27-Oct-20 15:49:24

I've been in work throughout, and can already see the relaxation of distancing and the decrease in fear among my colleagues. I imagine that will continue to some degree, and a vaccine and/or significant strides in treatment will be the spur for it to return even more towards normal.

Porcupineinwaiting Tue 27-Oct-20 16:59:56

@lunar1 that would be a real benefit. I have a colleague who is renowned for dragging himself to work long enough to infect the whole office before admitting he is too ill to work. It would be wonderful if that was no longer tolerated - certainly in my office we all know that working from home is now an option.

ohthegoats Tue 27-Oct-20 17:35:13

They are only little but already used to seeing masks, constant antibac gels, keeping distance, fear of the virus etc

They don't care though. You're projecting that as an issue.

I'm loving the lack of hugging/kissing on greeting. The rest will come back.

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