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What are the rules on sleepovers?

(28 Posts)
Bryyy Thu 03-Sep-20 20:52:23

My almost 10yo would like a sleepover for her birty but I really can't find any guidy about it. Might best guess is that she can only invite one friend over.

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LilyPond2 Thu 03-Sep-20 21:40:02

If you are in England and not in a local lockdown area you are not breaking the law unless you have a gathering of more than 30! However, the last time I checked, the guidance was advising that no more than two households should meet indoors at the same time. If you are in an area under local lockdown, they generally make it a criminal offence to have anyone round to your house for a purely social visit.

Lockdownseperation Thu 03-Sep-20 21:41:22

@LilyPond2 is correct and the 1 meter plus rule still applies.

Bryyy Thu 03-Sep-20 21:49:58

So for little girls really, it would just be one friend? As it would be impossible to keep the 1m rule at all times.

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Howmanyhourswastedfindinganame Thu 03-Sep-20 22:16:37

Is the friend in her school bubble?

Bryyy Thu 03-Sep-20 22:19:42

I wouldn't think so they're not in the same class.

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Wigeon Thu 03-Sep-20 22:22:16

The rules say that two households can meet up indoors including overnight, but they should maintain social distancing all the time: “ Yes, you are able to meet indoors in groups of up to two households (anyone in your support bubble counts as one household). This includes inviting people from one household into your home or visiting the home of someone else with members of your own household. You should continue to maintain social distancing with anyone you do not live with or who is not in your support bubble when doing so.”

Full guidance here

Duvetdweller Thu 03-Sep-20 22:22:27

Mine are about to go back to school in bubbles of 350 - they’re having sleepovers all the time of 3 or 4 when I can be bothered

Wigeon Thu 03-Sep-20 22:23:32

So this jeans that you could invite one friend to sleepover, but should try to keep them from touching/hugging/sitting close face to face speaking directly at each other.

Howmanyhourswastedfindinganame Thu 03-Sep-20 22:24:00

Duvetdweller Wow!

Wigeon Thu 03-Sep-20 22:27:47

The risk of 3-4 children sleeping over is much higher than most of the 350 people in a school “bubble” are to each other - with a sleepover, there is prolonged very close contact, in small indoor spaces (ie private house not large classroom) , probably not as well ventilated as a school.

This diagram from the British Medical Journal is useful, as it explains the various risk factors; sleepovers seem pretty risky to me in a way that actually a well controlled classroom doesn’t.

Queenie24 Thu 03-Sep-20 22:32:32

Im a bit confused with all the rules now. I thought under 11 did not need to social distance anyway so a sleep over would be fine. Mine are socialising with their friends now as they are back in secondary school together, sat together.

Duvetdweller Thu 03-Sep-20 22:34:33

There are also between 0-2 confirmed cases every week where I live

Racoonworld Fri 04-Sep-20 06:24:25

Queenie24

Im a bit confused with all the rules now. I thought under 11 did not need to social distance anyway so a sleep over would be fine. Mine are socialising with their friends now as they are back in secondary school together, sat together.

That’s true if you’re in Scotland. If you’re in England they do need to social distance still.

Racoonworld Fri 04-Sep-20 06:26:26

Op It’s one other household indoors whilst maintaining social distance. If they can’t manage that they really shouldn’t have one, especially if not in the same school bubble. Can’t she have an outdoor party instead with a few friends?

EmmaGrundyForPM Fri 04-Sep-20 06:28:23

I think this thread shows how difficult it is to understand the rules. In the beginning it was very simple but now it has become complicated especially as there is a big difference between guidance and law.

Bryyy Fri 04-Sep-20 06:44:13

She's 10 and very much a pre-teen/tweenager I don't think she wants an outdoor party at all (and we only have a small courtyard patio so social distancing would be hard anyways). Cases are very low 2/100k and personal I don't mind the risk but I know other mums might and don't want to go against general advice

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Augustbreeze Fri 04-Sep-20 07:36:05

If they'll be sleeping in the same room that's however many hours of sharing the same air.... it's risky. Those in a household bubble are advised that overnight stays are "allowed", which implies others aren't.

RedskyAtnight Fri 04-Sep-20 08:07:08

Can you compromise (with other parent's agreement) that she has their her one friend over and friend can stay till later than normal (10 or even 11) - perhaps they even get in their PJs and watch a film in the later evening?

I'd not allow my DC to go on a sleepover at the moment - it's a level of risk higher than other things they are routinely doing (including going to school).

Looneytune253 Fri 04-Sep-20 08:08:54

Surely they can easily social distance at 10? Especially if you're there to remind them?

Bryyy Fri 04-Sep-20 08:14:11

They could social distance bit she wants to do normal "sleepover activities" like doing their hair and things like that... She's also a very touchy type of person so it would be hard to not want to hug her friend while being at home. She's having a video game afternoon at her dad's with three friends but it's a much bigger house/room and the activity makes it easier to social distance. The idea of a late film is a good one though, I'll see what she thinks.

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Bryyy Fri 04-Sep-20 08:18:41

She just said no to the movie night idea. Oh well.

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Lockdownseperation Fri 04-Sep-20 08:42:13

Bryyy

So for little girls really, it would just be one friend? As it would be impossible to keep the 1m rule at all times.

1 meter rule is one meter plus a mask if not it is 2m

Frazzled2207 Fri 04-Sep-20 08:44:23

If it was me I’d allow one friend. Presumably she is seeing that friend socially anyway so increased risk is probably minimal.
My kids are younger but have understood that certain things just aren’t allowed at the moment.

OfficialLurker Fri 04-Sep-20 09:52:29

We’re not having parties with friends this year As I find parties hard enough without factoring in my law, guidance, my preferences and other parents’ - so instead going away for a couple of nights in a camping pod instead. If there something she would love to do with you this year that would make it special but stop the need to factor in other kids?

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