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Wouldn't getting everyone back to normal actually reduce infection rates now?

(16 Posts)
UltimateWednesday Fri 26-Jun-20 09:44:39

Certainly anti social behaviour.

We're seeing the crazy crowds, litter etc because people have so much time on their hands and so few places to go. The beaches wouldn't have been busy yesterday if everyone was at work and school.

OP’s posts: |
MistyGreenAndBlue Fri 26-Jun-20 09:46:45

Because you can't get infected at work or school?
Not sure I understand your reasoning here.

FrugiFan Fri 26-Jun-20 09:51:32

MistyGreenAndBlue

Because you can't get infected at work or school?
Not sure I understand your reasoning here.

You can get infected at work but the majority of workplaces will have social distancing / PPE and measures in place to keep the staff safe, whereas the beach does not.

BirdieDance Fri 26-Jun-20 10:01:25

People just need to stop being bloody idiots and use their brains a bit.

Darker Fri 26-Jun-20 10:05:02

Lots of people won’t have jobs to go back to and lots of people won’t be holidaying abroad, so the beaches will still be full.

Darker Fri 26-Jun-20 10:07:18

The litter on the beach has brought me back to reality with a bump. Just for a few weeks we had clear skies and noticed the birds singing, and I hoped that people would have pondered on the desire for a better world. Not so.

KenDodd Fri 26-Jun-20 10:11:08

I heard an expert on the radio the other day saying transmission outside (without touching kissing etc) is almost negligible. I've heard this from other experts as well. They said the problem would be inside areas, like public toilets. From that it sounds like offices would be more risky.

Newjez Fri 26-Jun-20 11:30:18

I've always thought New Zealand is like England without all the people.

For a little while there, England felt a bit like new Zealand.

I may be tempted to move to New Zealand when all this is over.

Derbygerbil Fri 26-Jun-20 11:54:13

@UltimateWednesday I think you’re entirely wrong I’m afraid, and I don’t see the logic in your suggestion at all.

It was “normal” that led to the exponential growth back in March that led to lockdown.... with the many thousands upon thousands, of non-socially distanced group indoor interactions that occurred daily over this period.

A few full beaches - outdoors, with sea breezes and with most people 2m away from other groups - doesn’t even remotely compare in terms of risk. The Daily Mail and such will sensationalise it, and choose photos that indicate people are crammed like sardines (which they’re not) but infections have continued decline even after weeks of “full beaches”.

Anti-social behaviour might be a problem, but actually, even a busy beach is very low risk compared to many other activities we did pre-March.

Derbygerbil Fri 26-Jun-20 11:57:26

@FrugiFan

You can get infected at work but the majority of workplaces will have social distancing / PPE and measures in place to keep the staff safe, whereas the beach does not.

True, but that’s not “normal“ is it, or the normal I was assuming @UltimateWednesday was implying.

LilyPond2 Fri 26-Jun-20 13:10:16

General consensus from experts is that risk of contracting infection outdoors is much lower than indoors. So your post makes no sense whatsoever, OP!

Keepdistance Fri 26-Jun-20 13:21:35

On the positive side at least they are getting vit d.

I do think this will be the case if all the furloughed people are at the pubs and cinemas next week. Or if they are all at the shops. (Yes they will be helping the economy but what is the cost of an icu bed in use?
Likewise if they are all at the playparks with kids all playing together

Barbie222 Fri 26-Jun-20 13:43:35

No, I don't agree. Everyone likes having a pop at the people on the beach, but the risk of transmission outside is low. The risk of transmission indoors is much higher.

ChocChip01 Fri 26-Jun-20 13:49:38

I guess this is what we are going to have to get used to over this summer whenever the weather is nice. I’m not condoning people who went to the crowded beaches (It’s my idea of hell even pre COVID) but people and families just want a day out / entertain the kids etc. It’s a combination of increase number of people not at work / school and limited places to go and people wanting a change of scenery from being at home.

PumpkinPie2016 Fri 26-Jun-20 13:49:53

No,sorry I don't agree. Transmission outside is far less likely than indoors.

We've had packed beaches before and cases continue to decline. How close do families actually get to other families when on the beach? Even on a busy beach, there would likely be at least a meter between groups.

lazylinguist Fri 26-Jun-20 14:00:09

No, I don't agree. Everyone likes having a pop at the people on the beach, but the risk of transmission outside is low. The risk of transmission indoors is much higher.

^This. I know that people just love a good froth about crowds on beaches and a good wail about despairing of the selfish and irresponsible inhabitants of this once great country and all that. But you're probably still much more likely to catch or spread the virus during your law-abiding supermarket visit or going to work.

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