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Social distancing in supermarkets

(84 Posts)
AtLastEarwax Sun 07-Jun-20 21:25:16

Ok I get it, we need to social distance and I understand that BUT the aisles aren't wide enough?? How do people deal with that? Sometimes with a 2 year old that has just spotted his favourite book on a shelf and wants to run over pick it up and show me??

Social distancing is just not possible in aisles that are so small??

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ineedaholidaynow Sun 07-Jun-20 21:27:01

If it is your 2 year old, they need to stay with you not run off.

dementedpixie Sun 07-Jun-20 21:28:04

Is that not why you're advised to wear a mask while in a shop

Hollyhead Sun 07-Jun-20 21:28:24

I think over time people will realise that briefly passing someone at less than 2 metres, unless they’re shouting or coughing, is really not very risky and they’ll calm the fuck down about the whole thing.

TerrapinStation Sun 07-Jun-20 21:35:42

Tbh people who let their children run around in shops are the problem. It's very frustrating trying to get round adults and keep some kind of distance but having random children getting in the way is really annoying.

AtLastEarwax Sun 07-Jun-20 21:36:51

I need a holiday - bet you look down your perfect nose at every fucker - urgh the kind of person I detest

So masks are for the width of aisles?? As in to compensate for lack of them??

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Hollyhead Sun 07-Jun-20 21:37:57

A 2 year old will have a natural vertical 1m social distance anyway as they’re about 1m shorter than most adults.

AtLastEarwax Sun 07-Jun-20 21:38:06

Terrapin please don't sneeze your perfect nose on me either

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lljkk Sun 07-Jun-20 21:38:23

3 seconds within 1m distance of someone who almost certainly doesn't have symptoms is not going to give you covid.

AtLastEarwax Sun 07-Jun-20 21:38:52

Good point Hollyhead

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Lindy2 Sun 07-Jun-20 21:40:56

Leave your 2 year old at home if you can or if they have to come with you put them in the trolley seat or hold their hand. Now is not the time for them to be running around a shop. You should be responsible enough to know that.

Even better, stay out of the shop altogether and shop online.

Standrewsschool Sun 07-Jun-20 21:42:12

People seem to socially distance differently in different shops.

In Tesco, there’s clear arrows going up and down, and people seem to respect it. In our local Morrisons, it’s more of a free for all once your inside.

Are you worried that someone near your child will infect them or you? I think the risk is quite low if there’s a very brief contact or no contact at all.

OneMoreLight Sun 07-Jun-20 21:42:31

Get a trolley, use the seat that's built in for children. Follow the one way system, pass people as quickly as possible and don't spend 3 hours choosing when there's other people waiting to get to the same section.

Standrewsschool Sun 07-Jun-20 21:43:25

At last - slightly rude response to posters.

TerrapinStation Sun 07-Jun-20 21:44:02

AtLastEarwax

Terrapin please don't sneeze your perfect nose on me either

If not letting a small child run around in supermarket at a time when the advice is not to is your idea of perfection you have a very low bar.

It's not all about you.

AtLastEarwax Sun 07-Jun-20 21:44:52

Can I clarify he doesn't 'run a mock' he went over to the other side of the aisle to show me his favourite book was there. Not in anyone's way but I was saying the aisles aren't wide enough to do that. What if you want to look at two side of an aisle if your looking for something??

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Mnthrowaway20202 Sun 07-Jun-20 21:46:34

This is why customers are advised to leave their children at home, with single parent exceptions. At the very least put them in the trolley seat or hold onto them as a PP suggested. Even reigns would be helpful so they don’t wander off too far.

We’re not quite in the clear yet, life isn’t fully back to normal unfortunately so your 2 year old can’t dart around in supermarkets just yet. I’m not trying to be nasty, your child being cooped up all the time will understandably find supermarkets even more exciting than normal, so it will probably dishearten them if they can’t explore like they want to. Keeping them at home where possible also protects them from the virus, so for their own safety it’s better for them.

AriettyHomily Sun 07-Jun-20 21:54:07

All the shops are one way here, most people respect it. Keep hold of your two year old. I never brought my two year olds to the the supermarket, it's a ball ache for everyone. Book deliveries.

AgeLikeWine Sun 07-Jun-20 22:02:26

I agree with others. Ideally, people should leave their children at home. If they have absolutely no alternative but to take them to the supermarket the children should not be allowed to run around or wander off. Staff should ask parents who will not control their children to leave the store.

DamnYankee Sun 07-Jun-20 22:08:29

I think over time people will realize that briefly passing someone at less than 2 metres, unless they’re shouting or coughing, is really not very risky and they’ll calm the fuck down about the whole thing

^This.

I don't object to children being at the store.
Children are not stopping me from getting my shopping done.
It's the adults. People who stop dead center in the middle of the aisle to muse over jars of pasta, cans of beans, or some non-emergency on their phone. [mad]

BogRollBOGOF Sun 07-Jun-20 22:10:18

I walk through the supermarket and swiftly overtake anyone that needs passing, or hold back at a safe distance if they are where I want to be.

A two year old doesn't worry me, at least unlike the majority of adults they can't sneeze or cough down into my face.

I can't see the logic in one way systems, surely they just congest the aisles with people that don't need to be there instead of them by-passing and gerting out of the shop quicker. Fortunately my shops don't have them as they sound totally counter productive.

UnderTheBus Sun 07-Jun-20 22:11:40

I think over time people will realize that briefly passing someone at less than 2 metres, unless they’re shouting or coughing, is really not very risky and they’ll calm the fuck down about the whole thing

Yep. If it could be easily contracted by walking past someone at 1.5m rather than 2m, the number of cases would be far, far higher than it is.
Ditto if the virus could be contracted from post or shopping items being delivered.

NotABeliever Sun 07-Jun-20 22:18:46

* I think over time people will realise that briefly passing someone at less than 2 metres, unless they’re shouting or coughing, is really not very risky and they’ll calm the fuck down about the whole thing.*

This ^ with bells on

Tilly030705 Sun 07-Jun-20 22:29:18

I think 2m is ridiculous. A few countries have done 1m. I think people need to chill out. The workers in supermarkets who are now door monitors are a nightmare. The sooner this ridiculous social distancing is over, the better.

AtLastEarwax Sun 07-Jun-20 22:41:52

I walked into a shop the other day (no queue) and she told me to go to the other side, by this time two trolleys had walked up to queue. So I had to walk past two people! Then coming out the queue to get in is straight out the door, what's the point??

I ignore the arrows if no one is down them, quickly get my things and go back round the one way.

I'm happy to hear some realistic folk rather than just the scaremongers band

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