Talk

Advanced search

Managers and HR people. Are you starting to see people signed off for mental health reasons?

(61 Posts)
Canyoutellilikrchocolate Mon 18-May-20 06:59:24

Specifically those who have been attempting to WFH with kids?

OP’s posts: |
KatherineJaneway Mon 18-May-20 07:05:17

We have some people with young children who we know cannot work full time due to lack of childcare. They are just asked to work when they can but we understand they cannot work their full hours at the moment. It's bad enough as it is, no need to make things worse for parents. Also it is not forever.

Shelley54 Mon 18-May-20 07:29:52

As above, we understand people can's feasibly do their contracted hours with small children to look after too. If it's becoming impossible - either no meaningful work can be done or stress levels are high, then we look at furlough (topped up to 100%).

We are all in this together - it's not easier for me than anyone else in my company.

HasaDigaEebowai Mon 18-May-20 07:31:26

Starting to get issues with people not working fully from home.

LookingForward6 Mon 18-May-20 07:36:59

Why are you asking? A daily fail journo looking for a mum bashing story?

Canyoutellilikrchocolate Mon 18-May-20 07:38:51

Why are you asking? A daily fail journo looking for a mum bashing story

Or a mum who is desperately struggling perhaps.

No I am not a journo

OP’s posts: |
Canyoutellilikrchocolate Mon 18-May-20 07:40:29

Thanks @KatherineJaneway @Shelley54 you sound like good managers

OP’s posts: |
ProfessorRadcliffeEmerson Mon 18-May-20 07:40:49

No, but I’m accepting that two of my team can’t do their normal hours because they’re juggling the work with childcare.

Packamack Mon 18-May-20 07:42:02

Starting to get issues with people not working from home

What does this mean? People taking their laptops to the park, or people failing to put in their allotted 40h pw of nose/grindstone?

I wfh permanently, and I only ever do the barest minimum I can get away with. Just like everyone in our HR department.

ProfYaffle Mon 18-May-20 07:45:41

Yes, though I have to say not just from people wfh with kids.

We're accepting that people are working around kids, different patterns etc but it's still pretty unrelenting for them and has been going on for such a long time now.

It's especially noticeable that it's just women reporting these problems.

nevernotstruggling Mon 18-May-20 08:26:22

I'm on the brink of getting signed off by my gp. One crisis this week will absolutely tip me.

And my kids are at school as I'm a sw.

HTH

HasaDigaEebowai Mon 18-May-20 08:35:23

Starting to get issues with people not working from home

Various things since Im a solicitor advising HR teams not an HR person, but broadly people who are supposed to be working from home rather than being furloughed but aren't actually doing anything in terms of work. Last week I had a number of calls along the same lines.

I suspect some of them are people who are struggling but would rather be "working from home" on full pay than signed off sick on less money. Its tricky to deal with.

Cuntycovid Mon 18-May-20 08:38:05

@nevernotstruggling are you a social worker ?
I am but only work part time thank god. got a one year old and was told can do some work from home , its dammed near impossible

Canyoutellilikrchocolate Mon 18-May-20 09:39:39

@HasaDigaEebowai what would your advice be if someone is doing less (but not no) work due to having a toddler?

OP’s posts: |
Thisdressneedspockets Mon 18-May-20 09:52:43

My husband's company have been very proactive in sending out emails reassuring staff that they're not expecting people to be working at full capacity and appreciate everyone's efforts. They are expecting about 60 percent capacity, so that they can pick up work if a colleague is sick. In reality, I think they're amazed by how much everyone is managing to give. They have been absolutely wonderful in pointing out this is not a normal work from home situation and they expect people to need time for caring responsibilities.

CraftyGardener Mon 18-May-20 09:55:35

Yes I've seen an uptick in people reporting mental ill health issues. I've been trying to be proactive including providing resources on managing your mental health and contacts for groups that can provide support. I've also been instructing managers to check in more often with their staff (can't believe you have to remind people to do that).

It's not scientific but my anecdotal observations are that the ones sticking to some sort of routine, getting up and dressed etc seem to be faring better. But I think we have to accept that unpredictability is stressful and people won't always be running at 100%. Far better to support them than immediately launch into performance management in my view. Hats off to anyone WFH with children in the house, you guys are troopers!

megletthesecond Mon 18-May-20 09:59:06

I'm pushing through for now but expecting I'll break when everything returns to normal in a year or so. I'm very good at pushing things down and dealing with them when I have time. that's healthy, not.

dairyfairies Mon 18-May-20 10:06:27

not HR just an employee. I have two DC and one is severely disabled. lone parent too. I hold my hand up. I have not been doing than the very bare minimum as I just don't cope with homeschooling too (esp with one child who needs 1:1 help for everything). I have been.condidering asking for a sick note for stress as I am really drowning but given that my pay is far better than SSP, I will carry on as long as I can this way. I suspect many others do the same.

Helenj1977 Mon 18-May-20 10:21:04

Dp heads up a large team. They're wfh with lots furloughed.

He's had to tell 2 to take time out in the last two weeks because they broke down on zoom meetings. I know one doesn't have children, not sure about the other. It's really sad that their not getting the usual support at the moment. I think some people need people interaction a lot more then others in order to do their job.

I'm not sure that going back to the office and social distancing is the answer. That might affect MH more. I'm worried for my children's MH when they go back to school and have to social distance.

wizzywig Mon 18-May-20 10:28:03

Myself and husband are public sector, its been expected that we meet our deadlines as usual. Not been asked by our managers if we are coping. We get lots of civil service info on wellbeing, but the things that would actually help,ie, relaxation of deadlines hasnt happened

HasaDigaEebowai Mon 18-May-20 10:32:39

@HasaDigaEebowai what would your advice be if someone is doing less (but not no) work due to having a toddler?

Every situation is different but broadly clients seem to be tolerant of people doing around 80% of their normal work when working from home. Once it dips below that they are having to look at asking people to reduce their hours or in some cases looking at furlough. The reason - childcare, stress, general struggle to be motivated will obviously vary but childcare in itself is not really an excuse for not working. Most clients are expecting people to work around this eg working in the evenings when children are in bed to make up the time.

dairyfairies Mon 18-May-20 10:42:04

Most clients are expecting people to work around this eg working in the evenings when children are in bed to make up the time.

gosh, I am glad I don't work there. I would either homeschool/do household or work in that case.

ConstantlySeekingHappiness Mon 18-May-20 12:44:42

Myself and husband are public sector, its been expected that we meet our deadlines as usual. Not been asked by our managers if we are coping. We get lots of civil service info on wellbeing, but the things that would actually help,ie, relaxation of deadlines hasnt happened

Exactly the same with me. I’m public sector and management are doing their usual monthly emails of “everyone’s doing a great job, thank you” and forwarding on general mental health advice.

But bombarding us with emails demanding x, y and z with absolutely no thought that things are taking a bit longer now as we’re all working from home and don’t have quick access to work materials.

Ultrasoft Mon 18-May-20 12:54:56

Not yet, but we've been able to accommodate everyone who has health concerns or anxieties wfh. People with childcare issues are wfh with minimal workload. We're starting to ask more people in now and so far have been able to use only those who are happy to return but I think there will be a lot of anxiety sickness once we're asking everyone back.

Canyoutellilikrchocolate Mon 18-May-20 21:19:49

Most clients are expecting people to work around this eg working in the evenings when children are in bed to make up the time

I really struggle with this. Takes ages to get toddler to sleep. I scoff something quick for dinner, do essential chores (house hasn’t been properly cleaned since March), have a shower. Occasionally I try to squeeze in some quick exercise / fresh air. Then I’m in bed 9.30 as toddler can wake up from 4am.

How am I meant to do significant work in the evening??

OP’s posts: |

Join the discussion

Registering is free, quick, and means you can join in the discussion, watch threads, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Get started »