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Secondary schools

(6 Posts)
azaleanth90 Mon 11-May-20 16:08:23

So the new guidance only mentions brief contact with teachers y10 and 12 - all other years aren't expected to be back in at all before September? I don't get why primaries are expected to manage (how is a mystery) and secondaries, which are larger and have pupils who at least in theory can understand social distancing, aren't? Secondary schools are doing work that's meant to be crucial for exams, and what's being sent home seems to be largely consolidation or make-work - there's no actual learning happening without teacher contact. What's the rationale for allowing y9s , who mostly have started GCSE work, to miss nearly half the school year? And are we expected to leave 11 and 12 year olds at home effectively til September while we go back to work? (all gratitude to the teachers who are doing all they can)

OP’s posts: |
GreenTulips Mon 11-May-20 16:10:55

The whole things a nightmare. Wouldn’t wish the decisions on anyone.

They need to talk to the GCSE boards to think of new ways for the exams as many have missed vital work and practical exams just are feasible.

HipTightOnions Mon 11-May-20 16:11:58

what's being sent home seems to be largely consolidation or make-work - there's no actual learning happening without teacher contact

This is not universally the case.

RigaBalsam Mon 11-May-20 16:16:49

What's the rationale for allowing y9s , who mostly have started GCSE

*Ofsted frown on this now. They don't like it at all.

I think its for several reasons discussed already on threads. I am not saying I agree.

Under 10s supposedly are less affected and transmit less ( though studies show either way)

Secondary kids travel from out of area on many buses.

Secondarys have jam packed tiny corridors ( as do some primary's I am sure)

Secondary kids hang around after school, snog etc

Secondary are not as compliant thinking of my year 9 boys licking a keyboard.

They are not needed for childcare as much and are deemed capable if getting on alone better. Hmmm

But it's probably just for the economy.

*

RigaBalsam Mon 11-May-20 16:24:12

It's a fallacy that Secondary kids can social distance better than primary. They are both difficult for different reasons.

OceanOrchid Mon 11-May-20 16:25:13

The fact they are larger is a huge part of the problem. Secondary schools don’t have spare capacity - they are larger because they house a larger number of children. Having a larger number of children means social distancing is less effective, because on sheer numbers you have more households mixing. Plus, because most secondary children will be in sets / option groups, each child will be in a confined space with a greater number of children and teachers over the course of a day than their primary aged counterparts. They are also more likely to rely on public transport to get to school, which the government wants everyone to avoid.

Besides which, secondary aged pupils can stay home alone safely, and can engage with remote working / other activities for longer periods of time without adult supervision. Ie, the plan for nurseries, childminders, and reception/year1 is as much to do with getting people back to work as anything else.

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