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Pubs, Restaurants, Coffee shops, what's the future?

(26 Posts)
Ihopeyourcakeisshit Fri 01-May-20 09:01:18

I was wondering at what point owners of the above businesses were going to have no alternative but to call it quits? I can't see how social distancing is a reality for these types of operations?

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Ihopeyourcakeisshit Sat 02-May-20 13:11:43

Just me wondering when I can have a meal/glass of wine out again?

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NotKeenOnSwede Sat 02-May-20 13:17:23

I think the only way pubs can social distance is if they spread out tables, only have one / two people at the bar and only alllow a certain amount of people in at once. But how will bar staff who already have a small amount of space distance themselves? Or the chefs in the back? What will be the point restocking at all if they are only allowed to serve 25% of their usual customers? I really don't see myself how it can work at all like this. I don't think anyone knows the answer.

TiddyTid Sat 02-May-20 13:20:47

I agree. Can't see how it will work or be profitable unless prices rise considerably to accommodate

DaisylovesDonald Sat 02-May-20 13:21:20

I think some of them will be ok - if they have enough space to spread things out a bit. I’m thinking the likes of pizza express etc which aren’t too crammed in anyway.
I think they will actually be allowed to open around the end of June IF they are able to ensure safety and a degree of social distancing. This is going by what other countries are starting to introduce as easing strategies.
What that means for those that can’t I’m not sure but a lot are simply going to go under I agree, because it will it be possible for them to operate at a lower capacity and make enough money to survive.
Pubs pretty much the same. If they can operate as table service and have the room to spread out they can open, so again it depends on if they can take that financial hit. I’m sure a lot of the smaller ones will remain closed, so hello Wetherspoons for all....
Cinemas I think will also be ok, it’s relatively easy for them to set up social distancing by blocking off seats etc and they very rarely operate at full capacity anyway. Just need some films for them to show! Mulan is still scheduled for July so I’m hopeful for that as I love the cinema. Theatres however need to be mostly full for every performance in order to make money so they will find it much harder.

And so much of this depends on how many people are willing to go back for now anyway. I will be.

Ihopeyourcakeisshit Sat 02-May-20 13:22:44

I wondered if it might end up being a bit of a free for all sooner rather than later? If you want to risk it do it?
Like you say I can't see how places can be operational other wise.

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NotKeenOnSwede Sat 02-May-20 13:26:06

The ones that will suffer the most I believe will be the little oldey worldy pubs in the country with their home cooked meals and open fire places. I love finding these little places, I don't want a shitty Wetherspoons :-(

Ihopeyourcakeisshit Sat 02-May-20 13:28:13

I don't want shitty Wetherspoons either, but I doubt price hikes are the way forward, a couple of rounds in the pub is not exactly cheap.

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UnabashedlyNeurodifferent Sat 02-May-20 13:30:56

Home delivery/Takeaway might just be the way forward from now. I don't see any other way unless everything goes back to the way it was. Places that can't afford to do this might suffer, sadly

whatisforteamum Sat 02-May-20 13:35:31

Notkeenonswede I work in a pub restaurant like that.All nooks and crannies with jam packed Fri Sat sundays! All cosy really with families.The boss of our company has said himself he thinks we are better off closed than with social distancing.TBH I think they will try their best to.comply but like he said profits will be down 80 %.
I don't think we will see families rush out for.a roast taking the grandparents as we previously did.Such a real shame.

NotKeenOnSwede Sat 02-May-20 13:36:08

Takeaway might work for food but I don't see how it can for alcohol. I mean who would pay to have a pint of lager and a vodka and coke plus delivery charge, when you can just buy a crate of Carlsberg or whatever from Aldi. I would pay an extra pound in my local if I went out for a drink just to show support but there are some "posher" places where a glass of wine was already £9...

Ihopeyourcakeisshit Sat 02-May-20 13:36:13

I really hope this isn't the end of things for the traditional local pub and independent restaurant or coffee shop.

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NotKeenOnSwede Sat 02-May-20 13:38:40

Plus you have to take into account so many people are in financial difficulty now, many are out of work or have had their own businesses go under. Not everyone can afford to go out for a meal and a few drinks anymore

TheCountessatHotelCortez Sat 02-May-20 13:39:29

Not everyone wants takeaway though, I personally enjoy getting dressed up and going out for a meal, it’s a difficult one

DaisylovesDonald Sat 02-May-20 13:43:28

I did read in the news though that they are looking at revising down the 2m distance to 1.5m or even 1m which would make a bit of a difference.

I also personally think that once businesses are reopening it will have to be more of a case of social distancing where possible and taking appropriate precautions if you can’t eg back to hand washing etc etc. So many places can’t social distance, certainly not to the 2m degree including schools etc so I think a lot of people will naturally become a little more relaxed about it once places start reopening.
@Ihopeyourcakeisshit I think there will be a bit of an element of free for all for those who are comfortable with it.

InMySpareTime Sat 02-May-20 13:48:59

If face masks or face coverings are required in social spaces, how will that work with cafes, pubs and restaurants?
I think they'll have to stay closed for a long while yet.

IcedPurple Sat 02-May-20 13:55:54

I hate to say it but I really don't see any good, or even halfway decent, option for restaurants and especially pubs.

Most of them operate on pretty tight margins as it is. If they have to limit the number of customers due to social distancing, many simply will not be able to afford to stay open. And given that people go to these places not only or even mainly for the food and drink but for the atmosphere and socialising. Who wants to pay 50 quid to sit behind a perspex screen in a half empty restaurant, being served by mask-wearing waiters? Not to mention that eating out is already a luxury for most, and given the huge economic toll this is going to take, lots of people simply won't have the money.

It's grim and I can't see any way around it. Restaurants can do take-away but the real money is in sit-down dining, especially with drink orders. Many will go under. It's sad.

Ihopeyourcakeisshit Sat 02-May-20 13:58:23

I don't think they can stay closed for a long while yet though.
I think there has to be some indication that yes you can start to open by...? Individuals can then weigh up the risk of visiting a pub or whatever, or if the Govt say it's not happening and then business owners can strategize an exit plan rather than try and hold out hope.

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Unworthie Sat 02-May-20 14:04:16

It's certainly very uncertain times for the hospitality industry at the moment.
Some hotels 'bread and butter' are corporate guests that work away from home or travel regularly, with a lot of changes made in that world towards WFH and virtual meetings etc recently, that could we'll have an effect too.
That's then topped up with tourists, many of which may well have reduced income themselves or be too worried about traveling.
I think a lot will probably sadly be unable to make enough to stay open and adhere to any social distancing measures imposed because it'll mean a drop in custom. Those who can adapt will, I'm sure.
But, as things start to go back to normal and things equalise there may well be an upturn in demand, which in turn could lead to places that have not made it through being reopened again further down the road.
It also needs a shift in customer expectations to work. Bars/kitchens will probably need to run on less staff and have table service to observe social distancing, that's going to impact on service times. Customers are also going to need to observe measures put in place to ensure social distancing happens, which means having to listen to the staff, some people unfortunately ime, have issues with that, though I would think the vast majority will go with it.
I'm not sure how it will pan out in the future, I do think that the tourism and hospitality industry will be one of the most hard hit in the long run and take longer to recover. But I'm certain it will.

Prontoe Sat 02-May-20 14:06:49

Ireland has set out a 5 phase map of what's going to happen and with dates. Pubs are in phase 5, with an anticipated date of August 10th for reopening.

First interview on this programme details how they've broken it down. I like to know what's happening; to see a light at the end of the tunnel. Wish our British government would set out similar, rather than leaving us all in the dark.

www.rte.ie/player/series/the-late-late-show/SI0000001694?epguid=PI000015730

IcedPurple Sat 02-May-20 14:09:50

It also needs a shift in customer expectations to work. Bars/kitchens will probably need to run on less staff and have table service to observe social distancing, that's going to impact on service times. Customers are also going to need to observe measures put in place to ensure social distancing happens, which means having to listen to the staff, some people unfortunately ime, have issues with that, though I would think the vast majority will go with it.

But people to go restaurants to relax and have a good time. If you're constantly having to worry if you're the required distance apart from your fellow diners, and having to wait ages for your meal, then many will wonder what's the point and will prefer to stay home with a take-away and Netflix instead.

Unworthie Sat 02-May-20 14:36:45

But people to go restaurants to relax and have a good time. If you're constantly having to worry if you're the required distance apart from your fellow diners, and having to wait ages for your meal, then many will wonder what's the point and will prefer to stay home with a take-away and Netflix instead.

Yes I can see that being an issue too, but for every person that finds any measures restrict their enjoyment and are a bit more relaxed towards them, there'll be someone else who will complain about that and feel they've been put at risk.
I don't think a sign on a door or table, setting out what measures have been taken to minimise risk, like tables further apart so a reduced number of covers available, table service only for drinks therefore please don't approach the bar, explaining that with bar and kitchen areas being small spaces to ensure safety of staff there's less of them so service times may be impacted and could be longer than you would have expected before, and reassurance that staff are adhering to best practice to reduce risks, is unreasonable and would impact that greatly on someone's experience to be honest, as long as they are aware.
It'll be about finding a happy medium that's not so restrictive to ruin an experience but also ensures any measures are able to be reasonably carried out.
But it is only going to work if everyone gives a little and cooperates. Businesses, staff and customers.

whatisforteamum Sat 02-May-20 14:39:25

I agree with icedpurple.The sheer social distance and being on guard sounds miserable.Thinking about the intimacy and chatting with the servers that goes on people that is why people to out,plus our delicious food of course! Seriously where I live the prices are already quite steep.I can't see anyone having money for luxuries in the near future.The sad thing is we've worked hard to be consistent and build a good reputation and it is all up in the air for all of hospitality.

InMySpareTime Sat 02-May-20 14:41:10

How would they keep toilet areas safe? Even if they can deep clean them every hour (unusual in most food/drink outlets) there's huge scope for infection there.

IcedPurple Sat 02-May-20 14:42:38

I don't think a sign on a door or table, setting out what measures have been taken to minimise risk, like tables further apart so a reduced number of covers available, table service only for drinks therefore please don't approach the bar, explaining that with bar and kitchen areas being small spaces to ensure safety of staff there's less of them so service times may be impacted and could be longer than you would have expected before, and reassurance that staff are adhering to best practice to reduce risks, is unreasonable

It's not that it's 'unreasonable'. It's that for most people eating out is a rare treat and if you have to deal with long waits and a lack of atmosphere due to reduced number of diners and masked up waiters, then many will simply decide that it's not worth the cost or the bother. Particularly given that a lot of people are going to be a lot less well-off in the coming months.

Plus, as I said above, most restaurants operate on very slim margins and need a full house at least at weekends in order to get by. If they have to reduce their covers by maybe 50%, in many cases it just won't be worth their while to stay open.

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