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Army issued with Citriodiol spray and advised to take Vitamin D

(42 Posts)
SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 07:30:34

I saw this on Sky News yesterday. (Can't do a link, but if you go on Sky News page, there is an article about this).
Basically, the Army who are working on the front line helping the NHS etc., have been issued with a spray containing Citriodiol which is a mosquito repellent, as an extra source of protection, along with PPE etc. I know from a close family member that anti-malaria drugs are used in hospitals as one way to treat Covid - so again, a link to mosquitos.

Also, I know a lot of you have been on the Vitamin D thread, and the army have been advised to take Vit D to boost their immune systems.

Just thought you might be interested in this.

S

OP’s posts: |
TKAAHUARTG Sat 25-Apr-20 07:32:50

World Health Organization said there was no evidence the virus can be transmitted by mosquitoes and that an insect repellant would therefore be ineffective. The use of citriodiol to prevent infection does not form part of its advice.

TKAAHUARTG Sat 25-Apr-20 07:34:05

And Vitamin D has been linked for decades with respiratory conditions.

SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 07:36:46

Well that's fine, but the Army are doing it anyway, regardless!

OP’s posts: |
TKAAHUARTG Sat 25-Apr-20 07:37:53

Ah. You did not want a discussion, it was just a PSA. Er ..thanks.... then?

Itisasecret Sat 25-Apr-20 07:38:45

Can I just say, it’s not just the ‘army’ there are other branches of the military.

TKAAHUARTG Sat 25-Apr-20 07:40:54

Although thanks to Trump, we all know that hydroxychloroquine has been used. But he also suggested we inject disinfectant.

SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 07:45:12

Yes, I know there are other branches of the military, of course I do! But the news report on Sky said that it was army who had been issued. As far as I know, my son in law, who serves in the navy, hasn't been issued with the same. Sorry, if repeating what Sky said offends you, of course it might be all military, but that wasn't made clear.

OP’s posts: |
SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 07:48:44

I do want a discussion @TKAAHUARTG, I didn't know the WHO point of view. Obviously the army (or military) are deciding it can't do any harm, but I would assume they are basing this on something.
I'm sure you and others know much more than me, but I thought it interesting.

OP’s posts: |
frumpety Sat 25-Apr-20 07:59:11

Hope they have got plenty of stock in, before there is a run on the stuff !

Nameandgamechange123 Sat 25-Apr-20 08:08:42

I actually hadn't heard this and think it's really interesting. Thanks for the heads up, I'm going to do some research!

iVampire Sat 25-Apr-20 08:10:07

Can you link a source for this? Something you think you heard on a rolling news channel might not be quite what it seems

Itisasecret Sat 25-Apr-20 08:11:38

No the news report didn’t say the army at all, ps not heard of it.

SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 08:17:32

Before the briefing yesterday, on Sky News for about 10 minutes. It will be repeated, I'm sure. The basic info is on the website, their news page which I did above. They discussed the spray. Whether you saw it or not, it happened! It'll probably be discussed on other news outlets. And the article says military, but the news slot said Army, and spoke to Army about it.

OP’s posts: |
SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 08:21:03

In the Guardian too - just have a look.

OP’s posts: |
iVampire Sat 25-Apr-20 08:21:20

OK found the SKY story

The Citriodiol spray was given out by the company which manufactures it, and from whom the original story came. So possibly unsolicited freebie not actually something the military sought out.

Info on efficacy seems to come either from manufacturer or is unsourced,

MoD and former officer statements are incredibly vague and neither endorse the product

It appears to be useful (according to the manufacturer) as a skin-safe disinfectant spray, which can denature the virus like other sanitisers do,

SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 08:23:58

And the article in the Guardian states that the armed forces are buying stocks for their 20,000 ARMY Covid support force.

Perhaps someone could link the article, I can't seem to.

OP’s posts: |
AgnesNaismith Sat 25-Apr-20 08:24:52

Although currently the virus is human to human, do you think the reason for this is because mosquitos or other blood sucking insects could potentially spread the disease from infected to non infected people?

SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 08:25:53

@iVampire, could you please link the Guardian article, sorry but I am unable to? It is more informative. Sorry to ask.

OP’s posts: |
SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 08:28:25

www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/24/british-soldiers-to-get-insect-repellant-as-covid-19-protection

don't know if link works - but have tried!

OP’s posts: |
slartibarti Sat 25-Apr-20 08:29:59

The Citriodiol spray was given out by the company which manufactures it, and from whom the original story came. So possibly unsolicited freebie not actually something the military sought out.

Sounds like a good marketing ploy by the manufacturers.
I'm surprised the army allowed this to happen.

SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 08:31:32

@AgnesNaismith, I have no idea, but I found it interesting. The link between the anti-malaria drugs they use in hospital to treat Covid and this news, just intrigued me. That's why I started the thread really!

OP’s posts: |
SophieB100 Sat 25-Apr-20 08:33:26

@slartibarti, they have ordered stocks for 20,000 front line army personnel, read the Guardian article! They didn't 'allow' it, after getting the 'freebies' they placed an order.

OP’s posts: |
daisypond Sat 25-Apr-20 08:34:08

The Guardian link says that the army has bought it, not given it for free.

Cornettoninja Sat 25-Apr-20 08:40:52

It appears to be useful (according to the manufacturer) as a skin-safe disinfectant spray, which can denature the virus like other sanitisers do

So basically a sanitising tool like alcohol based hand sanitiser?

This makes me think the army have just utilised a bit of common sense and lateral thinking given supply/stock issues. They can provide their troops with it without affecting NHS stock.

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