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(20 Posts)
spinthebottle Sat 18-Apr-20 23:12:09

Do you think all the protests that are happening in America would happen here?

It’s looks mental there right now! I just can’t believe this is happening? Do you think maybe if they extend the lockdown beyond these 3 weeks protests will start?

OP’s posts: |
PicsInRed Sat 18-Apr-20 23:14:51

Remember the Brexiters and Remainers down Westminster, yelling at each other and bullhorning slogans at reporters? The marches, the rage?

Yeah, it could happen here.

Floatyboat Sat 18-Apr-20 23:19:26

The lockdown got politically divisive in the USA. State v fed, Trump etc.

I don't think there is a natural way to split British society in such a simplistic way on this particular issue as it doesn't map easily onto prior issues for us.

DeRigueurMortis Sat 18-Apr-20 23:24:36

I think it depends on how long lockdown lasts.

In our favour we haven't got a President who is deliberately stirring the pot of rebellion for his own gain, but that said at some point some people are going to call for change.

The reality is that some of us are very lucky. Nice homes/gardens with lots of space, working from home with job security etc. Whilst lockdown isn't ideal, it's perfectly manageable and it's easy to adopt a very risk adverse approach.

However there are many people who are very badly impacted financially and emotionally and for them the risk/reward of lockdown isn't so clear cut - especially when lockdown is designed to delay the spread not to stop it.

So yes, I think there will be increased pressure to lift some of the restrictions but hopefully the govt will get the timing/process right to avoid any significant "rebellion".

fluntymactwunty Sat 18-Apr-20 23:26:29

No I don't think it would happen here. Polling has shown widespread support for the lockdown. Most of the population understand why we are doing this, and the government message on it has been clear.

We don't have Trump, thank God.

PicsInRed Sat 18-Apr-20 23:27:30

I don't think there is a natural way to split British society in such a simplistic way on this particular issue as it doesn't map easily onto prior issues for us.

Lockdown in palaces vs lockdown in tiny apartments.

80% furlough for the middle classes, laid off and no work for the working classes.

Furlough vs universal credit.

Staying home vs still have to leave home to work.

The conflict is already happening. It's pure class issues.

PickAChew Sat 18-Apr-20 23:32:55

The politically partisan element to the protests is mind boggling. A lot of them are happening in Democrat areas. Levels of lockdown are, rightly, on a state by state basis and democratic state governors are being more proactive and strict, then all of Trump's idiot supporters have a tantrum about it.

Floatyboat Sat 18-Apr-20 23:32:59

Maybe. But lots of public sector employment and decent benefit system for working classes dilutes this.

I wonder if it is more likely to be generationally divided rather than class divided.

Floatyboat Sat 18-Apr-20 23:35:25

The point I was making though is that British society is not already as divided. People tend to fall back into their groups from prior battles. I don't think Brexit/remain would match big lockdown v little lockdown view points for instance

tontie Sat 18-Apr-20 23:35:35

I think less so because we have a better safety net.

PickAChew Sat 18-Apr-20 23:35:59

80% furlough for the middle classes, laid off and no work for the working classes.

Are you saying that retail workers and bus drivers (examples of furloughed workers) are middle class?

tontie Sat 18-Apr-20 23:36:53

Surely the below is too simplistic

Lockdown in palaces vs lockdown in tiny apartments.

80% furlough for the middle classes, laid off and no work for the working classes.

Furlough vs universal credit.

Staying home vs still have to leave home to work.

tontie Sat 18-Apr-20 23:38:25

Tiny apartments can cost millions, plenty of middle class workers will lose their jobs, plenty of working class will receive furlough payments. Rich consultants & doctors who are leaving their homes working to save lives?

Ifeelinclined Sat 18-Apr-20 23:46:06

The problem really is trump stirring the pot. It's becoming a huge federal vs state issue. As far as I am concerned, the lockdown is necessary. I had to be tested for covid this week (still don't have results) and am at home on full pay. We have great delivery services in my area, so other than being bored I am fine. Others aren't so lucky. I could imagine that I would feel much differently if my husband and I were struggling to feed our family.

Mincepies76 Sat 18-Apr-20 23:47:44

Polling has shown widespread support for lockdown....has it? What polling?
I think the tide is turning...

JudyCoolibar Sat 18-Apr-20 23:48:30

It appears that lockdown is better supported here than the government anticipated, so the likelihood of demonstrations looks low. Bear in mind also that there are further strains in the US around access to health care, particularly with people losing the benefit of job-related health insurance.

PicsInRed Sun 19-Apr-20 00:01:30

Come on now.
#stayathome #makememories is just lovely with furlough, a 4 bed detached and a sunny garden in the suburbs. In a tiny 5th floor council flat, kids frustrated, zero hours contract now zero £££, it's really shit.

Do some people really not understand just how hard the other half are doing it? Just how grim some lives are? I think that is exactly the problem.

tontie Sun 19-Apr-20 00:07:58

No one is disagreeing with that scenario @PicsInRed I just don't think that's every scenario.

DeRigueurMortis Sun 19-Apr-20 00:39:23

No I don't think it's every scenario either but that said I think it's the most divisive.

There are absolutely many middle class families who are facing desperate times - most especially those who are badly impacted business owners.

However, overall those members of the community that are being hit hardest in terms of sheer volume are those at the lower income bracket.

Zero contract, no furlough, no savings to fall back on, no credit lines available, small/cramped housing, food banks having limited supplies due to hoarding etc

Whilst some of the middle are absolutely struggling they are also more likely to have some safety nets in terms of savings, family support, access to credit lines, a freezer full of food, options to re- mortgage etc

buttermilkwaffles Sun 19-Apr-20 00:39:32

"Polling has shown widespread support for lockdown....has it? What polling?"

"89% of Brits saying they support the Gov’ts lockdown. "
mobile.twitter.com/KellyIpsosMORI/status/1250724111682158593

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