Talk

Advanced search

Can my GP prescribe clomid?

(30 Posts)
Gracie123 Thu 22-Oct-09 09:22:34

Been trying to get pregnant for a looooooong time. Started charting nearly 2 years ago and using a fertility monitor since january. Thing is the monitor says I have only ovulated once, and it was in june.

So, can my GP prescribe clomid, or am I going to be referred to a specialist who will try and stick needles in me?

(massive phobia of needles, hence not bringing it up with dr before... blush )

sixfoldwaitingtime Thu 22-Oct-09 09:25:19

Mine did, but it's a big practice and she's an infertility specialist there. Other GPs may not be so keen, even if they can...

Gracie123 Thu 22-Oct-09 09:26:31

That's disappointing. Did you have to have any blood/hormone testing done first?

I was kind of hoping they handed it out as freely as the pill... grin

AttilaTheMeerkat Thu 22-Oct-09 09:30:45

gracie123

What should happen here is that your GP should refer you now to a gynae at a hospital's subfertility unit. They can also talk to you about your very real phobia of needles.

You need a diagnosis of the problem first and foremost and both of you should be tested further. Clomid is quite powerful stuff and is not suitable for everyone to take. Also you should be monitored whilst on it otherwise there is no way of determining whether its doing what it should be doing (clomid's main function is to make the ovaries work harder).

Please see your GP and ask for a referral. Do not put this off any more. If your periods are irregular in nature using OPK's and or temp charting as methods is not advised. Often such problems as well are caused by hormonal imbalances. Two common causes are problems with the thyroid and or a condition called polycystic ovaries.

sixfoldwaitingtime Thu 22-Oct-09 09:31:57

sadly yes, one month of two blood tests (CD3 + CD21) in which they tested every hormone level known to mankind, and then another lot of CD21 tests because they cocked up the first one.

Gracie123 Thu 22-Oct-09 09:54:36

I had all of these done in may (took four trips to the dr and several doses of diazepam just to get one set of bloods!)
haven't seen the dr since, but receptionist says they all came back normal. Are there any other options? My periods are irregular (between 17 and 52 days apart!) but fertility friend can predict them accurately to within 12 hours using just temperature.
Main concern is the lack of ovulation. Couldn't they see if he clomid was working just by using opk sticks?

AttilaTheMeerkat Thu 22-Oct-09 13:56:40

Hi gracie,

re your comments:-

"I had all of these done in may (took four trips to the dr and several doses of diazepam just to get one set of bloods!)
haven't seen the dr since, but receptionist says they all came back normal. Are there any other options?"

Think you do need to see the GP again. I would think something was missed on those blood tests. More to the point any test result done over 6 months ago should be discounted, you need up to date test results.

What they could be doing with you in the meantime is arrange to have an internal ultrasound scan done to see what your ovaries and uterine cavity looks like. No needles are involved in that procedure.

"My periods are irregular (between 17 and 52 days apart!) but fertility friend can predict them accurately to within 12 hours using just temperature. Main concern is the lack of ovulation.

With a cycle as irregular as this you are more likely not to be ovulating regularly if at all.

"Couldn't they see if he clomid was working just by using opk sticks?"

Unfortunately no as it does not work like that. Clomid can encourage the production of luteinising hormone (LH) so this method is not reliable (the kit reads LH). Also OPK's are particularly of no benefit if the menstrual cycle is irregular anyway. Many women with irregular cycles produce higher than normal LH levels so the kit reads the excess.

Would urge you to seek specialist advice via your GP and talk to them about your very real phobia of needles.

Gracie123 Thu 22-Oct-09 17:10:27

Saw gp this avo, she said I can't have clomid without fertility specialist and lots of needles required. She didn't think I could handle it, and probably right.
Dh and I discussed previously that if we couldn't have a baby naturally we would just adopt, so I think this might be the way to go.
Thanks for your help.

Gracie123 Thu 22-Oct-09 17:11:58

Ps dr is well aware of needle phobia. I'm on a waiting list for treatment, but is nhs so it takes time sad

dorothygale Thu 22-Oct-09 17:13:54

My GP insisted on referring me and the gynae also made me have my tubes tested (despite knowing I had PCOS)- but no needles at any stage

DuelingFANGo Thu 22-Oct-09 17:17:52

I had to go through the IVF clinic before I was prescribed clomid. I think the guidelines say that all otehr avenues should be investigated so that would mean you having blood tests to see if you are ovulating, if you haven't had them already, and having an HSG

DuelingFANGo Thu 22-Oct-09 17:22:52

hiya again - am a bit comfused about why you would need lots of needles? maybe some blood tests? But nothing more unless you are advised to take otehr drugs (Metaformin) withthe Clomid?

AttilaTheMeerkat Thu 22-Oct-09 17:38:55

"Saw gp this avo, she said I can't have clomid without fertility specialist and lots of needles required. She didn't think I could handle it, and probably right.
Dh and I discussed previously that if we couldn't have a baby naturally we would just adopt, so I think this might be the way to go.
Thanks for your help".

Gracie

I am very sad to read this message and think her comment re the needles was incorrect. You would need some blood tests done but this is usually only in the initial stages. And there is only one needle used for each blood test.

Can you get private based help re your phobia of needles?. NHS is good but as you say can take a long time.

Gracie123 Thu 22-Oct-09 19:16:30

Unfortunately no, we could never afford private. I'm not sure what the needles would be for, she just said I would need them.

I know it sounds really silly as I coped with blood testswhilst pregnant with no drugs, but the phobia returned very quickly after ds was born (passed out during the heel prick test)

Gracie123 Thu 22-Oct-09 19:18:56

Sorry if this is a really basic question but what is hsg?
also, how do you have your tubes tested?
As you can probably tell, fear of doctors has kept me in the dark on a lot of this stuff blush

DuelingFANGo Fri 23-Oct-09 08:53:03

Hey there. Am HSG is when they put dye through your tubes to chack for any blockages... info here

I have had one and it really wasn't painful for me so nothing to be too scared about.

DuelingFANGo Fri 23-Oct-09 08:53:51

an check

Gracie123 Fri 23-Oct-09 09:31:57

Thanks DF. It does involve an injection though doesn't it. I'm thinking I may just leave it a bit longer. Maybe we'll get pregnant without? And if not, we can still adopt. I just can't face all these medical procedures. I know that makes me a total coward, but I am. blush

AttilaTheMeerkat Fri 23-Oct-09 10:52:34

A HSG is a tubal x-ray (its a very useful test to have done) and no injections into veins are involved at all. Dye is carefully inserted through your cervix to see what the uterine cavity looks like and to see if the fallopian tubes are patent (open).

"I'm thinking I may just leave it a bit longer.

This is fatalistic on your part. But how much longer exactly?. You may not have a child of your own at all without any medical assistance. The subfertility may not be yours alone, your H may also have male factor problems. Without investigative tests you won't know and you won't be any further forward.

"Maybe we'll get pregnant without?"

A triumph of hope over experience. Your phobia of needles is really ruining your life and may well stop you ultimately from having a child of your own.

"And if not, we can still adopt".
I just can't face all these medical procedures".

Again this is fatalistic on your part. Its not at all easy to adopt.

Your case is one of the saddest I have read on here in a long time.

First and foremost you need to overcome your very real phobia of needles. Your GP should refer you urgently to someone who specialises in conquering such fears. What is it about needles that makes you so afraid?.

Ask your GP more about the needles used during the tests. I have had more fertility tests than I care to mention and the only time I saw a needle was for blood tests. Your GP telling you that you could not handle it is irresponsible. You need treatment for your phobia, the GP should actively be making enquiries about this. Treating phobias as well does not cost a fortune in monetary terms.

You cannot ultimately let your fears, and they are understandable fears, rule your life.

AttilaTheMeerkat Fri 23-Oct-09 10:57:35

If you google "treating phobia of needles" a lot of information comes up.

pipWereRabbit Fri 23-Oct-09 10:58:36

My GP arranged my inital blood tests (to check I was ovulating) and an inital sperm test for DH.

He then prescribed 3 cycles of Clomid - even though all was normal.

Clomid is a tablet - so no needles needed to take it (although obviously a needle is needed for the blood test).

NorksDrift Fri 23-Oct-09 11:30:56

Are you near London? Might this be useful?

Gracie123 Fri 23-Oct-09 12:52:06

Live about 7 hours away from london unfortunately!

It's complicated. I was abused as a child and CPN says that PTSD and needle phobia are both common developments with my history. I am having treatment on the NHS (or will be) but the first two methods we tried didn't work and I don't want to do hypnotherapy because I hate the idea of being out of control/vulnerable (another phobia) which the dr thinks will actually make me worse not better IYSWIM.

This also means I'm funny about internal examinations etc... hence my avoidance of the fertility specialist. I know you probably all think this is really bizarre, but I am more than happy to adopt. I spent the entire pregnancy with DS terrified of the birth and having to not wear trousers in front of a midwife/dr blush

My medical team were very sensitive about it, but it was still very stressful. I love children, and definitely want more, but although I can just about handle the medical intervention required for pregnancy, I'm really not sure i can cope with the idea of having medical intervention and then possibly not getting a baby at the end of it anyway. sad

I know adoption is a very long and difficult route, but for different reasons, and possibly ones that are not so stressful to me.

p.s. DH has been tested several times. No problems there.

Gracie123 Fri 23-Oct-09 13:24:37

p.s. I don't think GP is massively keen to help because she likes everything to happen naturally.

GP: only 9 out of 10 couples ttc with in a year of having their first baby manage, and there is nothing wrong with them
me: but we haven't.
GP: but 1 in 10 don't. There might still be nothing wrong.
me: but DS is 2.
GP: but nothing is guaranteed. I don't think you have been trying very long hmm

Gracie123 Fri 23-Oct-09 13:25:31

Sorry for the sarcasm. Just that 2 years with no contraception and 18 months of actively trying feels like a long time.

I'm sure some of you have taken much longer.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now