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TTC for 3 years - GP suggested Clomid???

(12 Posts)
Tryingforbabynumber1 Tue 04-Sep-07 14:34:50

Am going back next week to discuss this but in the meantime can anyone explain to me what this is and how it works??

lulu1414 Tue 04-Sep-07 14:47:14

Hi Trying... we clomid takers have our own thread try: clomid

You will see there are a few of us that have been chatting about our experiences. I was put on clomid (presently on 5th cycle) because after a MMC in October at 13 weeks I did not get AF for 6 months. The doc diagnosed PCO and gave me clomid to try to get me into a regular (and shorter) cycle. Clomid helps stimulate women to ovulate when they are not doing so on their own. I take my 5 pills on day 2-6 of my cycle.

ImBarryScott Tue 04-Sep-07 14:50:22

Well, lulu summed up what it is really well. Like all drugs, it's worth researching potential side effects, though I can't recall experiencing any myself.

Just wanted to say that I only had 3 AFs in a year when TTC. GP prescribed Clomid, I was pregnant within the month, and DD is now a happy and healthy 6 month-old.

So I guess you could say I would recommend it.

EmsMum Tue 04-Sep-07 14:56:51

My DD is thanks to clomid too...

Have you had tests to find out if your problem is in fact that you aren't ovulating? that should come before prescription surely.

AttilaTheMeerkat Tue 04-Sep-07 17:03:25

I am wondering why your GP has suggested clomid presumably in the absense of a firm diagnosis.
How can this person be certain that the problem lies with only your good self?. Subfertility is not solely a woman's problem.

Both of you as a couple should be referred to a gynae at a subfertility unit as a matter of course; such people usually like to see couples after 12 months of ttc without success. Infact I would insist to your GP that you are referred there asap and don't take no for an answer.

Clomid is powerful stuff. You ought to be monitored whilst on it as it can affect hormone levels markedly. GPs cannot do the monitoring; if you're not monitored you have no means of knowing whether its workingor not. It is therefore preferable for you both to be seen by a specialist unit who can treat you accordingly.

Tryingforbabynumber1 Wed 05-Sep-07 08:09:17

She mentioned it as a solution. DH has been checked and all is fine with thim. Apart from the 'keeping them cool' advice (he hates boxers!)

I am seeing her again next week as my first appointment wasn't booked long enough to discuss fully. I am going to ask to be referred and what options are available. She just scared me slightly by mentioning treatment before I have even seen a specialist.

tigerschick Wed 05-Sep-07 08:19:27

My gp was fairly certain of what was wrong with me (PCOS) and mentioned Clomid on my first visit to see him. I already have dd (conceived natually after 3 and a bit years) so my situation was slightly different. However, my gp arranged blood tests and an ovarian scan then referred me to a specialist who was over the moon that the gp had done so much. Everywhere is different and I have been told that some gps will proscribe Clomid themselves but it depends on your circumstances.
Good luck and hope you get some answers very soon smile

lulu1414 Wed 05-Sep-07 11:01:50

My GP also mentioned clomid very early on, but sent me to a specialist. I think that often they first think clomid if there is any kind of problem with fertility. My GP was totally useless, but in the end (after seeing 2 different specialists) I was put on clomid. I doubt a GP would put you on it- you will see a specialist to ascertain the problem.

ImBarryScott Wed 05-Sep-07 11:30:36

Hmm.
I was put straight onto Clomid by GP. BUT I had an existing diagnosis of PCOS confirmed by scan and hormone levels. Also only 3 AFs in a year. I guess if you have already have a diagnosis of a condition that affects your ovulation, then it's not unreasonable for a GP to give it a go.

mummydoit Wed 05-Sep-07 11:53:29

It's my understanding that Clomid is usually the first treatment to be tried but only when a physical problem has been ruled out. Before I was prescribed Clomid, I had an ultrasound, then various blood tests at different times during my cycle, then a
laparoscopy to rule any any tube blockage or abnormality to the uturus/tubes/ovaries before my specialist would prescribe Clomid. He said there's no point pumping you full of drugs for months - with potential side-effects - if there's a physical reason preventing you from conceiving. They also did a procedure that involved flushing dye through the tubes to make sure there were no blockages and apparently this procedure can clear small blockages and some women conceive naturally afterwards. I'd definitely encourage you to have all the available tests before starting drugs.

flosspot Wed 05-Sep-07 17:21:30

I was put on Clomid because I had a PCOS diagnosis and have been tryin for more than a year....and I did succeed briefly (mc June). You are supposed to be monitored, although I am not. But if that doesn't work, they plan to give me a laparoscopy.....

Good luck with trying.

AttilaTheMeerkat Wed 05-Sep-07 17:44:32

flosspot

I'd be very wary about using clomid; it is not always adviseable to use in some PCOS patients as it can raise their LH level markedly. You should be monitored whilst on it; you have no way of knowing whether its working or not otherwise.

I would ask them about the possibility of them ovarian diathermy rather than a lap operation. Lap operations are often only diagnostic tools hence my comment on this. Diathermising the ovaries (this is a keyhole surgery procedure whereby small holes are punctured in the cystic follicles on the ovaries) can kickstart ovulation in some PCOS patients.

If you haven't already heard of them I would suggest you contact Verity - their web address is www.verity-pcos.org.uk.

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