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i think i am the only person in the entire world, well, uk anwyasys, sho is trying to fill her kids with more calories.

(9 Posts)
stitchtime Mon 14-Sep-09 10:27:58

they just dont seem to get that their is an obesity epeidemic on. they are all of them, skinny as rakes. mil worries they are underweight and undernourished and i dont feed them. but i do. the only things we dont have at home at any rate, are fizzy drinks and sweets chocolates crisps etc. but we have them out and about all the time. i buy fruit, put it on the table, and it gone in a couple of days. depending on the fruit, it might only last a few minutes. they dont eat much veg, but the sheer quantities of fruit consumed, mean i dont stress as much as i should.
sigh. grass always greener etc.

3littlefrogs Mon 14-Sep-09 10:49:23

It is healthy to be skinny if that is their genetic make up. As long as they are eating well and healthily don't worry. Make sure they are getting a good mix of protein, fat and carbohydrate, vitamins etc and they will be fine. Don't give them low fat or low carb stuff - these are for fat adults, not growing children.

If it is any comfort, mine all eat vast quantities and are skinny. Wish I was!!! Their sports coaches tell me to give them more chips!!!

kreecherlivesupstairs Mon 14-Sep-09 10:59:55

You are not alone. I have a dd who is 8, 128cm tall and is on the 9th centile. She is just a bag of bones. She has a pretty poor diet but can fit into clothes for 4 year olds. The length is problematic. We've just been trying to buy her some autumn/winter trousers. We visited four shops and those that reached her ankles just slid down. The milk she drinks is full fat, the spread she uses is butter and I try to send a yoghurt in to bolster her calorie intake. The GP did say that it was better for her to be a thinifer than a fattypuff, but it is annoying. She loves to swim, but comes out virtually blue.

MarmadukeScarlet Mon 14-Sep-09 11:09:05

MY DS was very skinny (has a metabolic issue though so not healthy skinny) and it was really tough.

Poor DD who, like me has a tendancy to be sturdy, would watch me make him mashed spuds with cream, butter and cheese and she would get plain ones.

Now he has discovered Yorkshire Puddings, he has started to fill out somewhat!

hannahsaunt Mon 14-Sep-09 11:19:08

My boys eat constantly and it's predominantly fruit, crackers etc but I don't stress about them having crisps almost every day as they are incredibly active and you can count their ribs at the swimming pool. Clearly have their dad's genes envy

LynetteScavo Mon 14-Sep-09 11:22:52

I too have skinny chilren. (DS1 has more of a solid frame, so doen't look skinny with clothes on, but he is)

My food bill is massive.

I don't get it.

DesperateHousewifeToo Mon 14-Sep-09 11:38:37

At least with all the dcs the same, you can add calories to all their food together (sneak in cream, butter, cheese to as much as you can) smile

I have a thinnifer and a sturdipuff grin

Trying to feed up ds with extra fats and calories whilst avoiding giving them to younger dd is quite tricky.

At least ds is now able to have school lunch, so that seems to be helping at the moment.

Op, can you substitute some of the fruit snacks for more high calorie things e.g. cheese, fruit cake, scones (with clotted creamwink)?

ChopsTheDuck Mon 14-Sep-09 11:44:06

My ds is underweight due to hypermobility syndrome. I try to feed him fatty foods to get him to put on a little bit of weight, as he is very skinny.

RustyBear Mon 14-Sep-09 11:50:08

I've been trying to fatten up DS for over 21 years - he's still skinny (and short, which bothers him more) despite all our efforts.
However, he is the healthiest person I've ever known - he had a total of four days off in his entire school life.

DD is also skinny, however it's seen as OK for a girl, so it doesn't worry her, which is just another instance of double standards.

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