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Can someone talk to me about Type 1 diabetes in children please?

(12 Posts)
Lucythecat Fri 05-Jun-09 16:52:47

My best friend's 9 year old son is currently in ICU having collapsed yesterday and being diagnosed with diabetes. I feel pretty useless as they are in Cardiff (they were on holiday) and we are all up here in Manchester.

How is his life going to change? and theirs as a family? Is there anything I can read up on to help her. any good websites etc?

I've changed my name slightly for this but I'm still clearly recognisable.

tia

Lucythecat Fri 05-Jun-09 17:17:09

nobody?

ApuskiDusky Fri 05-Jun-09 17:19:57

Hi,

Sorry to hear about this, my niece was diagnosed at Chrismas at the age of 3, and it was all quite scary.

Websites I know they use: insulin dependent diabetes trust. Also juvenile diabetes research foundation.

Not sure where to start on life changes. Don't go out and buy diabetic food, I understand it's largely unnecessary. My dn is allowed sweet stuff as long as she has it as a pudding as opposed to a snack. Everyone has got used to the injection routine very quickly, and they've had support from diabetic nurses going in to talk to her preschool etc.

Hope that helps a little. I'm sure others with more direct experience will be able to help more.

Lucythecat Fri 05-Jun-09 17:25:09

Thanks for that ApuskiDusky - that's a relief to hear that your dn's routine was established quickly - I feel pretty useless tbh - apart from having to phone 15 people to cancel his birthday party which was supposed to be on Monday (he was 9 last week)

I shall check out those links. Much appreciated.

It's one of those 'there but for the grace oof god' situations sad

ApuskiDusky Fri 05-Jun-09 17:29:46

I think the main thing I tried to do was not make a big deal out of it, once her health had stabilised; so we've all tried to make it seem very manageable and straighforward for her (and for her mum), showing that she can just be normal like everyone else.

Your friend may need ongoing support though - our main fears about dn are the health complications that can arise for her because of the diabetes, and that will be an ongoing worry.

Lucythecat Fri 05-Jun-09 17:32:14

absolutely and she does tend to veer towards the maudlin/dramatic - even though she is my bf and we love her dearly.

It will the long term implications that will worry her most I suspect.

Twinklenips Fri 05-Jun-09 17:36:43

My DS3 was diagnosed last year. It's tough coming to terms with it at first, but it soon becomes a way of life.

We haven't changed our diets, he still has sweet stuff, just has to count it and adjust the insulin accordingly. They will have to weigh all his carbs to make sure he gets enough insulin, learn to read labels (!) and learn to estimate portion sizes when eating out.

The diabetic nurses have been a Godsend, really helpful, so tap into their knowledge.

It's difficult to know what to advise, but if you have anything in particular you want to know, ask away and I'll try and help!

Spidermama Fri 05-Jun-09 17:39:56

Hi Lucythecat. It's really great that you are preparing to help and support your friend like this. What a great friend you are!

My ds is now 9 and was diagnosed with T1 diabets at the age of five.

Whilst I sort of agree with apuski about no making a big deal of it, I've been hurt by some friends who seem to dismiss T1 diabetes as a relatively minor inconvenience. It's not. Just because the child looks 'normal' on the outside, it doesn't mean his life hasn't been completely turned upside down.

The insulin and eating regime is relentless even when they are ill. There's no escaping it.

On a practical level I think it would be nice to learn about having a diabetic child to stay or what to do at meal times, signs of hypo to look out for etc etc. It's so fantastic for the mum of a diabetic child to have someone who concienciously engages with the subject who she can really trust to 'get it' and have her child round for tea.

I may well be rambling. Lots going on in my life at the moment but am happy to re-visit this thread if there's anything specific you want to know. It's such a big subject and your friend is in the very early stages. She will have some grieving to do. sad

Lucycat Fri 05-Jun-09 17:45:01

Many thanks for that Spidermama and twinklenips - I may well be back to pick your brains in the future. It really is uch appreciated.

her ds is the same age as my dd and her dd is my dd2's best friend so we're pretty much intertwined. It would be great to be able to offer practical support as well as being a 'sounding board' for her and her dh.

Lucycat Fri 05-Jun-09 17:45:19

Many thanks for that Spidermama and twinklenips - I may well be back to pick your brains in the future. It really is uch appreciated.

her ds is the same age as my dd and her dd is my dd2's best friend so we're pretty much intertwined. It would be great to be able to offer practical support as well as being a 'sounding board' for her and her dh.

Lucycat Fri 05-Jun-09 17:45:41

oops blush twitchy finger

Lucycat Sun 07-Jun-09 13:20:33

Just wanted to update thos of you who were kind enough to post on this thread.

My friends somn is now off his insulin drip, there is no sign of impaired brain function - (which is what they were worried about when rehydrating him)and he seems a good deal better. They are hoping to come back up north tomorrow if he remains stable

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