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Mumsnetters aren't necessarily qualified to help if your child is unwell. If you have any serious medical concerns, we would urge you to consult your GP.

Can anyone recommend a blood pressure monitor for a child?

(14 Posts)
trixymalixy Tue 05-Dec-17 16:59:26

I'm a bit baffled by the selection out there. Do I buy a child cuff for an adult monitor?

MarmaladeIsMyJam Tue 05-Dec-17 17:00:27

Why do you need one?

trixymalixy Tue 05-Dec-17 17:06:54

DS has severe allergies and his anaphylaxis presents as a drop in blood pressure with not many other symptoms apart from feeling a bit unwell so it's hard to know whether to use the epipen or not. I think it would help inform us if we knew what his normal blood pressure was.

Rainbowandraindrops67 Tue 05-Dec-17 19:30:54

We have to measure blood pressure regularly - we had to buy a Doppler and a child blood pressure cuff and learn to do it manually. Auto machines just don’t work properly in a child. If your child is older you might be able to get away with an automatic one though?
The child dopplers are very expensive.
What other symptoms would he have? Heart rate is easy to measure - would this be affected?

Rainbowandraindrops67 Tue 05-Dec-17 19:33:52

www.gosh.nhs.uk/health-professionals/clinical-guidelines/blood-pressure-monitoring

CatastropheKate Tue 05-Dec-17 19:36:35

How old is he? I can feel it in my hands when blood pressure drops, if I touch one hand with the other, it kind of feels as if I'm touching someone else's hand. This, coupled with the swallowing/throat is my emergency signal as such.

Rainbowandraindrops67 Tue 05-Dec-17 20:10:55

Ps you could buy a cheap finger pulse oximeter to measure heart rate
Or just measure it manually by putting your finger on his pulse and counting for a minute

AnyFucker Tue 05-Dec-17 20:16:48

That's not a good idea, love

By the time a child's BP has dropped they are in serious need of medical attention

Fannying around getting potentially false readings (see the link above) wastes valuable time unless you are trained in advanced life support

Administer the epipen and call 999. That's what you do.

trixymalixy Tue 05-Dec-17 20:45:53

We have a pulse oximeter already for his asthma.

Anyfucker we are pretty experienced in the use of epipens thanks love. If we think he's eaten something then we'll epipen and call 999. It's for the times when he's telling me he doesn't think it's an allergic reaction but he's unwell just for my peace of mind that his blood pressure hasn't dipped.

lljkk Tue 05-Dec-17 20:48:01

Sometimes too much information is a distraction not a support.

I think I'd ask for advice from a nurse or pharmacist about how useful this could be. What are the blood pressure standards for children, anyway? Are they different from adults.

Rainbowandraindrops67 Tue 05-Dec-17 20:51:00

Don’t listen to the people critising you for wanting to be able to look after your son. I completely get, anyone who has ever had a critically unwell child gets it. You just want to be able to check yourself what is going on.

trixymalixy Tue 05-Dec-17 21:01:50

Thanks rainbow, it's for times like recently when we're fairly certain the reaction just necessitates piriton rather than an epipen, but it would give us peace of mind just to check his blood pressure is normal. Or for the time when he's sent home from school looking ill and being sick and you're 99% sure that it's not an allergic reaction but a quick check of his blood pressure would give you peace of mind.

Rainbowandraindrops67 Tue 05-Dec-17 21:09:12

Totally get it.
Sorry not to be more help on the monitors. Our child is younger and requires an accurate measurement hence why we have to have an expensive manual kit.
You might be able to get away with a child cuff on an adult automatic machine but be wary that the results might be very inaccurate.
I should have though heart rate would drop too when blood pressure drops but I’m not a dr smile

MsHomeSlice Tue 05-Dec-17 21:13:34

an ordinary OTC one would suffice surely?...if it's not actual pressure, and it is a difference you are looking for

mind you'd have to use it often to get an idea of normal so maybe that is not such a good idea

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