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Mumsnetters aren't necessarily qualified to help if your child is unwell. If you have any serious medical concerns, we would urge you to consult your GP.

One grommet out - now what?

(35 Posts)
Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 21:02:52

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Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 21:09:15

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Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 22:01:02

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TheColdDoesBotherMeAnyway Thu 27-Nov-14 22:05:18

I would ask your HV or GP for a referral to audiology and go from there if you've got concerns about his hearing. When was it last tested? Are you due another appointment with them or ENT?

(I'm a student HV and parent of a toddler with glue ear smile)

TheColdDoesBotherMeAnyway Thu 27-Nov-14 22:06:43

And have a chat with his teacher about steps they can take in school.

StarlightMcKenzie Thu 27-Nov-14 22:07:14

Whaaat?

Of course they do one sided grommets. Or at least I had them, and all my kids have had them.

Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 22:09:00

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Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 22:11:25

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Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 22:13:48

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Memphisbelly Thu 27-Nov-14 22:16:28

I was told if my ds needed grommits in for a second time they would send him in for one sided but check the other ear at the same time, if it was working loose they would change than one too?

TheColdDoesBotherMeAnyway Thu 27-Nov-14 22:20:23

She's up and down - she's 2.4 now and diagnosed at 4 weeks so we've had a lot of audiology input but our ENT appt has only just come through. We're very lucky that her speech is good for her age she takes after dd1 who doesn't pause for breath but she is likely to be trialled with aids at her next assessment on Monday.

I would push for an audiology assessment, our team are really responsive. They can refer back to ENT as well if necessary.

Chat to his teacher, they will have come across glue ear before, I wouldn't jump in with the DVD and books straight away but you can always offer them.

Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 22:25:56

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Memphisbelly Thu 27-Nov-14 23:02:57

My ds is 4.4 I was told this about 8 weeks ago by an audiologist ad ENT refered us as he is now has the opposite problem of hypersensitive hearing. eNT, audiology and the local walk in center all said they would do one ear but check to make sure the other ear is properly in place. Think every area is different but you can push for it if your child is stsrting to struggle again.

After 3 people saying one grommit had fallen out a nurse saw that it in fact was still in place (and showed us to prove it) she said they are working out of his ear and wax is building up around them, one caused him so many problems last week as wax is now pushing on one side of the grommit causing pressure and pain. His have done well though he had them in May last year so 18 months!

Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 23:03:44

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Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 23:10:24

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YvesJutteau Thu 27-Nov-14 23:14:30

Also, a hearing aid would help -- a behind-the-ear aid wouldn't be ideal but would give some benefit, while a bone conductive aid (normally on a towelling headband) would be even better (although it would be more obtrusive so might not be keen to wear it).

Messygirl Thu 27-Nov-14 23:36:04

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YvesJutteau Fri 28-Nov-14 00:08:08

A behind the ear aid would definitely give some benefit, though. My DD has a conductive loss on one side (hers is permanent, but glue ear is just a temporary conductive loss so essentially it's the same thing) and will not have anything to do with the soft headbands so she uses a BTE aid. She's 3.9 and quite rough-and-tumble herself but provided the tubing is cut to the right length it stays in pretty well.

Messygirl Fri 28-Nov-14 08:22:18

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Messygirl Fri 28-Nov-14 10:04:19

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YvesJutteau Fri 28-Nov-14 11:46:26

(I should say that in her case she has a profound sensorineural loss on the other side, so her conductive-loss ear is her "good" ear and they don't really have any choice other than to aid it, so from the point of view of hospital policy on who they will give a HA to the two cases aren't directly comparable. But telling you that a hearing aid wouldn't help with a conductive loss is clearly rubbish, because it does.)

Messygirl Fri 28-Nov-14 20:03:37

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beautifulgirls Sat 29-Nov-14 11:26:51

DD1 had one come out about 10 months before the other and she had repeat episode of glue ear, however in her case it was self clearing within a matter of weeks. She was about 2.5yrs old when they were put in (after a year of glue ear!) and so 18-24mths later when both were out she had grown a lot more and was able to overcome glue ear by herself. It doesn't apply to all children even at that age, but I do hope your DS is as lucky as he grows and he can be on top of this. I understand your frustration. DD had a lot of speech and communication issues too, though we later found out with her that there were other reasons aside from the glue ear in her case.

Messygirl Sat 29-Nov-14 11:48:47

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Messygirl Sat 29-Nov-14 11:53:32

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