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Tics - dr or not?

(9 Posts)
SAHRum Mon 13-May-13 10:13:18

my daughter (Y1) has had a number of motor and now verbal tics over the past 18 months or so, we have always ignored these (having read up on the subject) and just let her get on with it. They come and go in severity and are quite noticeable at the moment. Previously this hasn't been an issue at school because quite frankly none of the other kids have noticed as they were all too busy doing funny kid stuff themselves but now they are becoming less egocentric they have started to pick up on it and dd's teacher asked how we would like to "handle" it. Talked it over with dd and she has agreed that it is ok for her teacher to explain that dd can't help it and it's just one of the things she does. I asked dd if she would like to go and see a man/lady about these things she does to see if they could give her any tips to help her make these less noticeable - she said yes which means going to the GP and getting a referral BUT do I go down this road? I don't want her to have drugs but perhaps some CBT might help? On the other hand I don't want her to think that there is "something wrong with her that needs fixing" BUT she has obviously noticed that it's something the other kids don't do and that they are now picking up on it and therefore making her more aware of it.

Any experiences welcome

oh and she tics everyday, pretty much all the time, each tic lasts about 3 weeks and then it changes slightly and it's usually one tic at a time.

Stressedtothehilt Mon 13-May-13 15:51:51

I would go to the gp. My dd has ADHD and she gets tics from time which doc says is common with ADHD so not a tic disorder that needs treated but I would def get it checked

RooneyMara Mon 13-May-13 15:58:23

I think, in my limited experience that this will only serve to make a 'thing' of it - unless you do get a ref to a behavioural psych which you may not.

I had this sort of thing as a child and I grew out of it - it was anxiety in my case. Have you any inkling what might be stressing her or do you think it might be something else, you know, more physiological?

Stressedtothehilt Mon 13-May-13 16:41:48

Sorry forgot to add kids grow out of motor tics but its rare they get verbal tics as well

toomuch2young Tue 14-May-13 09:36:31

Hey I am an adult with tourettes and also help with parents with children with tics and tourettes.
Have a look at the tourettes action page
www.tourettes-action.org.uk/
Am in a rush now but will pop back later and can answer any questions you have.
A diagnosis isn't just a route to treatment if that's not what you want, it's a way of increasing people's understanding. Far better she feels she has something recognised and is not just 'weird' or 'different'. They can be transient but the way your daughters tics are presenting, motor and vocal over a period of a year meet the diagnostic criteria for tourettes. Also if the tics continue and progress though school a diagnosis will be access to support should she need it like accommodations for permission to leave the class room for tic breaks etc.
don't be afraid of tics and tourettes just do as much reading and educate yourself and others in her life as much as possible. Happy to help at all feel free to PM me.

SAHRum Tue 14-May-13 10:15:20

thanks toomuch2young I've been building up to this path for a while and I think you're right about seeking help. If that's what it is then that's what it is, let's arm ourselves with knowledge and get on with life right? She's bloody BRILLIANT and I'm going to do my best to give her the best access to the best support she can get. I've made an appointment with the GP (2 weeks time is the best they could offer me!!!) but that's ok. I suppose my main fear having read about Tourettes is that usually other (more frightening) conditions come hand in hand with this - OCD, social dysfunction, self harming etc and it scares the life out of me. Or are these things rare and not at all underlying of most people with Tourettes (as in the misconception that Tourettes means swearing all the time) My daughter is very bright and sunny, full of the joys of life, sporty, social, doesn't appear to have any problems with reading/understanding at school, is kind and very caring and to see that all disappear would break my heart sad

toomuch2young Tue 14-May-13 23:13:29

She is still going to be bloody brilliant!!
Nothing about her will change by getting her 'labelled' she will just have more support and options available and more understanding.
Yes some co morbs are common with TS but its not a guarantee. I have TS fairly severe and mild ADHD. Some people have mild tics and severe problems with OCD. Others have severe tics and no other problems. Many people have tics as a child and out grow them as an adult. Nothing is guaranteed and don't go borrowing trouble ahead of time. She is still your little girl and she sounds great and like she will cope with any challenges just fine.

SAHRum Thu 16-May-13 10:58:21

of course! I just worry that she is going to end up depressed and with other issues when she's an adult, not because of being labelled but because of some of the other things I've read about - ridiculous I know! Must stop that nonsense.
Can I ask toomuch (love your name by the way) when your tics started? you can PM me if you don't want to out yourself etc

toomuch2young Thu 16-May-13 21:01:18

Yes it's good to be aware but just remember everyone is totally different and is affected in different ways.
I had tics from 6 and was diagnosed as everything from asthma to eye troubles - non of which I had - just constant coughing tics, sniffing and eye rolling! Eventually started the more severe tics as a teenager and got diagnosed with full blown tourettes plus ADHD.
We are now in tourettes awareness month, so a good time to be finding out information! All the best to you and like i say PM me any time with any questions.

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