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Writing imperial measures with a 'point' in them

(6 Posts)
Pseudonym99 Sun 11-Sep-11 15:59:27

When HCPs write imperial measures with a point, does the measure after the point actually indicate a fraction of the whole number in tenths? For example, if an age was written 3.4 years, does that mean 3 point 4 years, or does it really mean 3 years and 4 months?

Similarly, if a baby's weight is stated as 7.5 lbs, does it mean 7 1/2 lbs, or 7 lbs 8 ozs?

Why do they not make it unambiguous what they actually mean when they write it by not mixing imperial measures with decimal fractions?

TrillianAstra Sun 11-Sep-11 16:20:08

People on here definitely write years with a point not to indicate decimal fractions (tenths) but to indicate next unit down.

e.g. 3.11 = 3 years 11 months.

Pseudonym99 Sun 11-Sep-11 16:31:28

Confusing - to me 3.11 years is just over 3 years and 1 month!

ripstheirthroatoutliveupstairs Mon 12-Sep-11 07:16:06

Whic is why metric is the better way of recording things. I have no idea of my DDs height or weight in old fashioned stones and pounds. I do know her height in centimetres and weight in kilogrammes.

CaptainMartinCrieff Mon 12-Sep-11 07:38:21

If a HCP wrote 7.5lbs I would assume 7lb8oz anything else would be incorrect and the HCP would be in the wrong for being misleading.
If a MNer wrote 3.11years they would also be wrong unless they actually meant 3.11 (but no one is that precise) but I've got used this numbering now.

HappyAsASandboy Mon 12-Sep-11 08:00:44

My HV does this. I had no idea which was meant, until
I converted the metric weight into imperial myself. When she writes 7.15 she means 7lb 15oz.

It does irritate me. But then most things about my HV irritate me. I only see her to get an accurate weight, and just nod and smile at the batty advice she hands out.

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