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CM Club:M sickness policy obviously needs updating - any suggestions?

(26 Posts)
Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 09:41:42

My parent obviously aren't 'getting' the D&V problem/issues etc

I have had a bug take 33-40% of us out

I have also had parents
1)trying to drop off after a child has been sick,
2)questioning the need to collect after diarrhoea,
3)questioning the 48hr exclusion
4)trying to drop off children before the exclusion is up

So I am thinking
a)for the next week making parents sign to say that their child has not had D&V within the last 48hrs
b)reissuing my sickness policy along with strongly word letter
c)creating a form detailing (with tick boxes) why you child is being sent home & when they can return

Does that seem reasonable?

Should I also reword the D&V part of my sickness policy - I'll post it in a minute (when I have found it)

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 09:44:38

Sickness Policy - As you will be aware, we have a responsibility, which we take very seriously to protect the children in our care from illness. With even the most stringent precautions all the risks of infection cannot be eliminated. We have looked at the relevant guidance and tried to apply a common sense approach to minimising the risks. This is set out below in a series of policies and procedures.

• When a child has had sickness (vomiting) or diarrhoea parents will keep the child at home for a minimum of 48 hours after the last episode of illness, before returning him/her to WC. This is a legal requirement.

• If a child is sick (vomits) or has diarrhoea whilst at WC, the parent will be contacted for the child to be collected and will have to keep the child at home for a minimum of 48 hours after the last episode of illness.

• Please inform us if a child has been ill or given medicine during the 2 days before attending WC; it is important that we are informed so that we can make decisions for their care while in our setting.

• If a child has a temperature of 38 degrees or over, whilst at WC, the parent will be telephoned and asked to take them home. This is because a temperature that high may cause infantile convulsions and therefore the child needs one to one care.

• When a child has conjunctivitis, the parent needs to keep the child at home until either the eyes are clear or the doctor has agreed that it is not infectious.

• If another child has chickenpox, WC will not be excluding them as long as they need no additional care (we will not be applying calomine etc). This means that your child will be at risk of infection.

• If a child becomes ill during their time in our care, we will try to contact you (or your alternative) immediately. If it is felt necessary or beneficial to the child, Liquid Paracetamol or Liquid Ibuprofen will be given. An additional form is supplied for completion, please supply sachets of medication for use.

• Prescription medicines can be administered by Registered Childminders. An additional form is to be completed on a daily basis. Medicines must be in their original container with the pharmacy printed directions.

It is important that when a child is poorly and in need of one-to-one care, that they receive the care that they need. This cannot normally be done within a childminding environment.

• If your child is unable to participate in our normal daily routine, including playing outside and accompanying other children when we drop off/collect from school then your child MUST stay at home.

• If your child is irritable, continuously crying or requires more attention than we can provide without impeding the health, safety or well being of the other children in our care then your child MUST stay at home.

Please remember that if we look after poorly children it means the other children will get less care, this could mean that your child is the one that misses out, because we are looking after someone else’s.

Does it need changing?

childmindermk Fri 16-Oct-09 10:31:58

I think that sounds very clear as to what you will and wont do and what you expect parents to do regarding various illnesses. I cant think of anything else you should add so therefore it seems fine to me!
Problem is more likely that parents just dont always abide by the rules and think if they bring the poorly child in, they wont be turned away!
I know this is the case with us! they often say 'DC seems fine today but have given them calpol...just in case!'
Which normally means 'I know my child is still ill but i am busy at work today'
Sorry seem to wandered into a general moan, but i think your policy is very good and clear.

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 10:41:34

Tell me about it hmm

Am I going over the top with my additional precautions? (a,b&c)

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 10:48:10

Oh & I have been accused (not overtly) of lying about a child having diarrhoea - so should I offer to keep any nappies with diarrhoea to give to parents?

Mousey84 Fri 16-Oct-09 10:50:43

I would include that if staff catch the bug then there may not be enough cover to take all the children and the facility may have to close. This seemed to get the attention of a particular set of parents I work with.

Re a) do you mean that for a child who comes 5 days a week, the parent will have to sign every day? Or just on the first day they come that week (second is more reasonable)

In regards to chickenpox I would clarify that you will not knowingly take on a child that has chickenpox (between when the spots appear and scab over) Parents who dont know much about chickenpox may think you are ok with taking kids throughout the whole illness.

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 10:57:20

WRT signatures, what about parents who wilfully bring the child after an episode of D&V?

Mind you, I suppose lying on paper is no different to lying face-to-face sad

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 10:58:20

We are closed Mouseysad

childmindermk Fri 16-Oct-09 11:34:15

I think by doing a, b and c that should definately get the attention of the parents and make them realise how serious this is!
I dont think you are going over the top, just doing everything you can to ensure that they abide by the rules in future!
Regarding the saving dirty nappies to show a parent who doesnt believe you about their childs illness then i think even suggesting to them that you would be willing to do this should prove your point! I dont think they would would actually want you to keep it for thier inspection!

Mousey had a good point about stating that if a child passas infecton/ illness onto staff members then there will be NO childcare available to them...although your 'parents' should have got that message given your current situation!

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 11:38:25

What is the deal if I cannot contact a parent (or their representative) within an hour - what should I be doing?

Pogleswood Fri 16-Oct-09 11:48:05

Just a question here - is your policy stating that you will taken children with chickenpox,who are not unwell - with the risk they will infect other children? And if so ,why is it ok to give another child chickenpox,but not conjunctivitis(the eye equivalent of a nasty cold,often) or D&V?
As a parent I'd always follow the guidelines for D&V,but wouldn't be completely happy to keep a well child who'd been sick once 36 hours ago at home,if I knew that they could go in while infectious with chickenpox!

childmindermk Fri 16-Oct-09 11:48:33

This im also unsure about!!!
Luckily this has never happend so far...but we regularly get voicemail or unanswered calls when trying to contact a parent when their child is unwell!
In fact this happens more often than not when first trying to contact them...but luckily for us we have always contacted them or had them return our calls within 15 minutes which doesnt sound bad but when there is a poorly child with us and we cant get hold of the parents its very annoying!

I would like to know what, as a childminder, we should do in the event of not being able to get hold of parent or other contact after a considerable amount of time when there is a poorly child needing to go home.

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 11:58:53

Except that once the spots are scabbed over which is generally when they start to feel better they are not really infectious (according to my GP)- if they still need calamine on then they can't come - it has generally not been a problem so far - however you are quite within your rights not to chose me as a childminder - I provide my sickness policy at the initial enquiry stage

For a short time I had a child with reduced immunity & the policy changed during that time

Pogleswood Fri 16-Oct-09 12:00:51

Thanks for answering ,Katymac,it was curiosity really!

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 12:03:53

Don't worry - if you have a look here all the 'arbitrary' rules we childminders apply are listed grin

We don't create them - we just administer them hmm

Danthe4th Fri 16-Oct-09 12:39:09

Most sounds fine but I would drop the legal requirement bit as thats not true, we follow guidance about illness and adapt to suit us but it's not law.
Conjunctivitus is now usually accepted into settings once treatment has started and i'm surprized you accept chicken pox as this would mean all the children would have to stay at home and wouldn't be able to go to toddler groups etc.

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 12:45:05

I thought under EYFS we were required to abide by the HPA stuff?

Chicken pox is only excluded for 5 days, which is pretty much in line with my policy - however I don't regularly take 9 children to toddler groups so staying in is not really an issue

Danthe4th Fri 16-Oct-09 12:51:41

I also meant to say with prescription medicines I would say that they needed to have been taking them for a minimum of 12 hours before attending the setting in case of any allergic reactions.

katalex Fri 16-Oct-09 12:59:51

I'm not a cm but as a parent who has used cms before, I think what you propose is completely reasonable. I had to take 2 weeks off work once because the other mindee's parents refused to abide by the d&v rules and the cm ended up in hospital with a bug she had caught from him.

WRT c) - maybe you should ask the parents to sign to say they will not bring their child before the return date that you state.

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 13:02:15

Good points both of you - Thanks

dmo Fri 16-Oct-09 13:44:05

one of the children i care for had diarehea on a wednesday so sent her home she was off thursday but was so much better so sent her to pre-school friday and they phoned me to say she was really ill

took her to the dr's and he said she should still attend pre-school/childminders as it was not contagious hmm

coral Fri 16-Oct-09 15:40:52

Katymac, I provide parents with the first 3 pages of the guidance on infection control document to parents attached to my sickness policy saying

"I recognise and put into practice the guidance recommended and laid down in the attached document entitled “Guidance on infection control in Schools and other Childcare Settings” produced by the Health Protection Agency. Please may I in particular draw your attention to the 48 hour rule applied to cases of diarrhoea and/or vomiting illness." I also highlight it in on the document with a very bright pen!

coral Fri 16-Oct-09 15:44:19

Meant to add that I too also have a very strongly worded paragraph about the perils of bringing infectious children into my household!

The signing to say they've not been ill thing Katy - what exactly would a signature do though? We all know some parents wil lie through their teeth about illness and tell bare faced lies, sure a signature won't put them off.
I agree with katalex that it may be better to have them sign a slip made up that when they collect ill child to say understand when they can return.

How are you feeling today?

Katymac Fri 16-Oct-09 16:22:39

Fairly rough tbh & now I am tired after all the cleaning I have been doing

I know whta you are saying about the signing but I'm not sure how else to get it across sad

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