Advertisement

loader

Talk

Advanced search

This topic is for discussing childcare options. If you want to advertise, please use your Local site.

Nanny or nursery?

(17 Posts)
NatLex Thu 08-Jan-09 16:50:51

Hello
My son is 18 months and currently in a nursery full-time. I have recently been thinking about a nanny on a part-time basis to break the week up for my son a bit. Is he too young to be ina nursery full-time? Would it be better to get a nanny now or later when he is in school?
Just wanted to get other people's opinions and experiences with nannies and what age they would be better for, younger or older children. Also thinking ahead for when he is at school and will need to be dropped off and picked-up. Myself and my husband both work full-time and have no other help available to us.
Appreciate other people's thoughts.

pickcherries Thu 08-Jan-09 16:57:52

i know many children who are in nursery full time, at 18 months i don't think he's to young, is he use to it (how long as he been going?

strawberrycornetto Thu 08-Jan-09 17:05:08

My DD is in nursery full time, although not necessarily full days every day because DH's work is varied. She has loved it and has got a lot out of it in terms of learning and friends. Does your DS seem happy? Is there anything you are particularly concerned about?

nowwearefour Thu 08-Jan-09 17:12:06

i think consistency is quite important but then i have a nanny so really like that option too! so v hard ot know what your son is like, who you would have for a nanny etc. nannies are v v good for when they are at school for the whole drop off ting but that is a while away yet. are you planning any other children as then it makes more sense to have a nanny alreay in place imo

Tummum Thu 08-Jan-09 22:24:23

I have 2 DC and they were at nursery until DD1 was 3-ish, when we got a Nanny.

I think my kids loved nursery as they interact with others and do stuff they wouldn't do at home. But a Nanny is more flexible for older children with school and is more personal because they build a relationship with the Nanny and the day is adjusted around them and their needs.

Agree with previous poster that Nanny is better option for older kids and more than one DC. It also brings it's own challenges such as when Nanny is off sick / managing holidays and having to deal with an 'employee' who is in your house e.g. having to manage her if she is doing something you don't want her to do. Also they can be v. expensive !!

delightedoldbag34 Thu 08-Jan-09 22:40:55

Hi Tummum [waves]
Tell me more about having a nanny.......it is something we are considering for when the new baby is here. I will have DD1 to be collected from school at 3pm and already have DD2 in nursery (at £36 per day). To put the new born into nursery (at a few months old) is £40 per day I think so between the two youngest a nanny might work out better and be able to collect the eldest from school too.
When you say v.expensive.......just how expensive would you think? Also we are in Scotland so possibly cheaper up here - not sure where you are based?

As for the question of whether 18 months is too young for full time nursery I think lots of kids do this and once they are into a routine it's fine. Kids love the routine and their friends and a good nursery is a great place for young children to flourish (IMO). My 2 yr old loves her nursery as did DD1 (who went full time from about 2.5 yrs I think - but was there between 3 and 4 days from about 1 yr).

tankie Thu 08-Jan-09 22:50:44

delightedoldbag - nanny wages will depend on where you are, but I should think a starting point for Scotland would be £350 net for a 50 hour week. £350 net would be a gross salary of around £450, and a cost to you of just over £500 a week.

NatLex Fri 09-Jan-09 11:31:48

Brilliant, thank you ladies for all the comments. My son started nursery at 10 months and we built up his sessions gradually to prepare him for full-time, so I think we will leave it as it is.
very useful to know that people think a nanny would be better when kids are older. great. I will definitely keep that in mind and try and find one for drop-offs and pick-ups when the time comes.
Thanks again

Tummum Fri 09-Jan-09 17:55:37

Hi Delighted <waves back and grins>
We love our Nanny - the kids are so happy and it makes life so much easier for school runs / when DC are ill / if you are stuck in traffic on way home / not having to bundle them out of the door in the morning and drop off at various locations.

We asked one of the nursery nurses our kids really liked if she would be interested in leaving and us paying her the 2 lots of nursery fees we were up for instead. We also bought a car that she uses. Compared to her nursery salary she got a good deal and I think we get a good deal too. You will need to take into account you need to pay employers tax and NI contributions - we pay £150 per year for a book keeping service that create pay slips and calculate all of the tax stuff you need to keep up with.

Hope this helps.

delightedoldbag34 Fri 09-Jan-09 19:38:42

Tummum - that's brilliant! I wouldn't have thought about poaching the best nursery staff....hmmmmmm [thinks about the lovely girl at nursery that DD2 adores]. Money-wise childcare is always going to be a nightmare so we just have to balance up the convenience factor of it I guess. Your set-up sounds fab though, will need to sit down with the calculator and DH and see where we end up.
Thanks!
(and also thanks for the wages info Tankie - much appreciated).

babypringle Fri 09-Jan-09 19:56:15

Delighted - check your nursery contract before poaching nursery staff - both the nurseries DS has attended has a clause in the contract saying that parents would be liable for six months fees if they employ a member of nursery staff within six months of the child attending nursery.

Tummum Fri 09-Jan-09 20:18:14

This is definately true.... but if you are careful no-one need know....

delightedoldbag34 Fri 09-Jan-09 20:28:26

Oh blimey , will get my contract out and have a look!

juneybean Sun 11-Jan-09 14:29:40

There are pros and cons for both really.

A nanny can look after your little one when he is poorly, a nanny might do occasional babysitting, a nanny can help around the house where stipulated in the contract.

A nursery provides child curriculum, a social aspect etc. Is cheaper.

Definately check your contract re: poaching!

purplebee Mon 12-Jan-09 09:33:25

We are about to take on our first full-time nanny and I have no idea how much holiday to offer. What's the normal annual amount? And after how long are they intitled to it? Also, if we go on holiday at a different time to her, do we still pay her? or is it reasonable to offer her half pay?

I'm self-employed so have no idea about this sort of stuff. The nanny we think we are getting is extremely assertive so I want to know my facts before we enter negotiations. Thanks in advance!

purplebee Mon 12-Jan-09 09:34:54

We are about to take on our first full-time nanny and I have no idea how much holiday to offer. What's the normal annual amount? And after how long are they intitled to it? Also, if we go on holiday at a different time to her, do we still pay her? or is it reasonable to offer her half pay?

I'm self-employed so have no idea about this sort of stuff. The nanny we think we are getting is extremely assertive so I want to know my facts before we enter negotiations. Thanks in advance!

purplebee Mon 12-Jan-09 09:38:12

Sorry for cluttering this all up! I posted my message in the wrong place! While I'm here, for what it's work, I thought about nursary instead of nanny but worrying about what would happen when he is poorly swung me in favour of nanny. I guess it depends what your work is like, how easy it is for you to take time off when your child is poorly. Right, I'm off now to the correct thread!

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now