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Childminder v. nursery for 3 year old

(10 Posts)
Roastchicken Wed 30-Jul-08 12:34:47

DD has been at a fab childminder for just over a year and gets on really well with the others. However, from September when she turns 3, the older ones are moving on, so she'll be there with a 2 year old and a 9 mth old, both boys. Although she's been happy there, and gets on well with the CM, I'm a bit worried about the lack of other children her age, as the main reason that we send her there is for socialising. There is a local nursery which takes children from 2.5-school, which seems nice and has a place for her. I don't want to disrupt her for no reason, but I'm concerned that she may get bored at the CMs now her friends have left.

purlease Wed 30-Jul-08 12:38:25

DD is at a nursery which I am very happy with but you are sure to get some very strong views expressed here on the dos and don'ts of both options.

Personally I think the nursery would probably prepare her better for a move into school in 1 or 2 years time.

hamsgirl Wed 30-Jul-08 12:41:43

Could you send her to a sessional pre-school nursery which is usually a couple of hours in the morning. Most CMs do pick ups and drop offs to these. You get a certain number of hours free too when the child is 3.

Other than that it depends on your child. My son hates change and I don't think he would settle in nursery very well (he's only 2.5 at the moment though) but you know your daughter best.

Roastchicken Wed 30-Jul-08 15:36:46

Thanks. Unfortunately the CM doesn't do pick-ups. DD has 2 years to go before school, so can do school nursery next year.

witchandchips Wed 30-Jul-08 15:46:56

nursery. At 3 they get so much out of playing with other children. If you were at home with them you would be on playdates and taking them to the park where they'd meet others of the same age, a childminder cannot look after the younger ones AND be a princess needing to be rescued.

southernbelle77 Wed 30-Jul-08 15:47:26

It really depends on the child I find. As a CM I have had children who are definitely better in a home from home environmnt and some that like much more social interaction (which they can get from a CM by going to lots of different group activities!).

If you think nursery would now be better then it might be worth trying it. If she is happy at the CM and you think she will still get the social interaction you placed her there for then it may be best not to change things.

You know your dd best

Love2bake Wed 30-Jul-08 15:50:47

Is she with the CM full time?

If so, how about putting her in a nursery 2 days, and with the CM 3 days.

I think at 3, most children benefit from nursery.

Roastchicken Wed 30-Jul-08 17:30:42

Ok. I think that's decided then. The childminder is really fab (outstanding Ofsted and totally deserves it), but DD is very sociable and confident and always trying to play with older kids. She'll prob move to school nursery next year, so I was concerned about double disruption, but I think she'd get more out of this year if she's with older children her own age.

purlease Thu 31-Jul-08 13:07:33

If nursery is close to school she might meet children who will be moving to school nursery next year. DD is going to school nursery for 2 hours each morning from September. 4 of her current group are also going to be going there which means she has no problem with transition. At an open morning recently she abandoned me as soon as we arrived at the school. I think there will be more tears from me than from her when she starts school. smile

PrestonChildminder Thu 31-Jul-08 14:29:57

Most good CM's go to toddler groups every week, I look after 3 children each day from 3 months to 3 years and they all get so much out of going to groups and meeting new people, playing with children of all ages.
Lou x

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