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Needing some advice on new job.

(5 Posts)
katrin174 Fri 18-Mar-16 10:06:50

I am meeting the family at the end of the month and we have not yet discussed payment.

Firstly what would you recommend I charge for these hours? I work in Hampshire. And also do you think I should ask the employers to pay my tax NI like my other families do or should I just declare the extra income myself as babysitting and pay the HMRC the tax by using a self declaration form. Not sure its worth them going through the whole nanny process for just 4 hours childcare per week for 38 weeks of the year.

One final question I have is the family will be paying my petrol money for the school drop off. With the family I currently work for I get paid my petrol for the commute to and from the school as I am collecting the children and taking them to their home. However with this family I will taking them to school and then heading home afterwards so would I charge petrol just one way 8miles or would it be the same as the other family where so am paid for 16miles which covers there and back. I think it is the later but just want to double check.

Thanks In advance. smile

katrin174 Fri 18-Mar-16 10:12:49

Ohh just noticed the first part of my post got deleted :/ I'm new on here and not sure how to edit my post.

It was meant to say...

Hello, just after a bit of advice. I currently nanny for two families and as of April I will be helping out a third family with 2 morning school drop offs (7-9am) and 2 hours of ironing per week term time only. This works out as 6 hours per week for 38 weeks a year as the children go to private school and have long holidays.
I am meeting the family at the end of the month and we have not yet discussed payment.

Firstly what would you recommend I charge for these hours? I work in Hampshire. And also do you think I should ask the employers to pay my tax NI like my other families do or should I just declare the extra income myself as babysitting and pay the HMRC the tax by using a self declaration form. Not sure its worth them going through the whole nanny process for just 4 hours childcare per week for 38 weeks of the year.

One final question I have is the family will be paying my petrol money for the school drop off. With the family I currently work for I get paid my petrol for the commute to and from the school as I am collecting the children and taking them to their home. However with this family I will taking them to school and then heading to e afterwards so would I charge petrol just one way 8miles or would it be the same as the other family where so am paid for 16miles which covers there and back.

nannynick Fri 18-Mar-16 18:58:46

>I'm new on here and not sure how to edit my post.

Welcome to Mumsnet. You cannot edit your post once you have pushed the Post Message button.

Your question is partly to do with Employment Status. This as you may know from browsing questions asked on here is a tricky subject.
Your starting point is to use the HMRC Employment Status Indicator to get a view.

You say you are "helping out a third family with 2 morning school drop offs (7-9am) and 2 hours of ironing per week term time only." So does that mean you have two other employed jobs already, which are under contract and you are getting payslips showing tax deductions?

Two mornings a week, same days each week, term time only, is still a job - the parents are most likely expecting commitment from you to turn up and to do the work - work they determine, they can tell you what to do, moan when you don't do it to their standard. They have a lot of control even if they may not actually exercise that control all the time.

If this was your only job, then the pay would be below the lower earnings limit (£112 per week) and thus the parents would not need to do anything. As it is not your only job and as it is regular work not ad hoc, I feel it is likely to be classed as employment. That then gives you employment rights - such as paid holiday (which they could insist is taken during school holidays) and right to being given notice if the job is to end. More about Rights At Work

6 hours x 38 weeks = 228 hours.
Holiday at 12.07% = 27.52 hours.
Total Hours Per Year: 255.52 hours.

It this was paid at £12 gross an hour, it would be £3,066.24 perhaps rounded up to 256 hours, £3072. Short hours can be paid reasonably highly as it is not easy to find someone to do that work. You will need to look at local area job rates to get a feel for the likely salary in your specific area.

In 2016/17 tax year (which starts in April), with a BR tax code (as you have other work) there would be a deduction of £614.40 for income tax. There is no employee NI, no employers NI. So the parents cost would be £3072 + Payroll Admin (around £180 a year if you are paid monthly - Parents Guide To Employing A Professional Nanny).

As an employee you get mileage payments for using your own car for work.
This can be up to 45p per mile before it becomes taxable. For a small car, it may work out around 30/35p a mile - depending on the miles done. The lower the mileage, the higher the per mile cost. You would be paid for the journey made from their home to the school and back to their home. If you took the children to school then did not head back to their home, you could negotiate to be paid the return trip as if it was really made, as long as the real journey from the school to your home is longer. Your home may be many miles away from the school, or it may be close to the school. You should not be out of pocket for transporting the children but neither should you make a profit, so you need to find the balance point.
One day per week would you not be going back to their home to do the ironing?

nannynick Fri 18-Mar-16 19:03:15

Why is this not like babysitting? A babysitter does a one off assignment, not the same hours every week, or most weeks as in the case of term time only. A babysitter chooses which work to accept and which not to and can cancel at fairly short notice without much problem (they may not get booked again by that family if they cancel bookings frequently).

What you describe is much more of a job - you are committing to work certain days, certain hours. The family in turn want that commitment, they need you to be there at 7am... you cancelling at late notice will be very inconvenient.

So I feel this should be done as a proper job - there are not sufficient indicators to say that it is self employed work. It is though something you may need to get a status decision on - Write to HMRC Status Team.

PotOfYoghurt Fri 18-Mar-16 19:13:54

Nannynick, you're always so thorough. I have nothing useful to add. Just that.

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