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does this sound fair?

(16 Posts)
AMcoffeeLover Thu 28-May-15 14:31:20

I'm a nanny having a second interview with a family this evening.
Its a nanny/house keeper/house management role, 55 hours a week.
They have offered flexibility during school hours and I was thinking of asking for the school hours off on a Friday (so 8.30-2.30 off) as I think the full 55 hours will exhaust me and I'd like time to do my own things such as food shopping and decorating my new house ect. obviously I'd not be paid for those hours, and would want them contacted as not working.
But I want to avoid squeezing 5 days worth of housekeeping work into 4 days (a friends has ended up in that situation and she's really struggling to get it all done)......so is it fair to ask the duties be cut to reflect the hours I'd like to work? Like using a speedy iron service so I wouldn't need to iron? And what should I suggest regarding the school holidays? There are great clubs around the kids could go to and friends to see. I honestly think 55 hours a week will do me in! The longest i've worked before is 43 hours and that was tiring enough!

wizzywig Thu 28-May-15 15:33:16

hi. what kind of tasks would you be required to do as a housekeeper?

AMcoffeeLover Thu 28-May-15 15:40:59

Everything lol
all cleaning, washing, ironing and shopping plus all the odd jobs

AMcoffeeLover Thu 28-May-15 15:42:48

And cooking plus all childcare and homework stuff

strawberrytablecloth Thu 28-May-15 15:50:21

If I were employing you to do this role I'd probably agree to reducing the duties to reflect reduced duties provided it was something like ironing which could easily be outsourced and you would be prepared to cancel your plans if my DC was ill & so not at school. However, I wouldn't let you have a a Friday off as I'd want you to get my house ready for the weekend (cleaning, unpacking of supermarket shop, meal prepared or baking done).

electionfatigue Thu 28-May-15 15:56:52

I honestly think 55 hours a week will do me in!

Am I being a bit dim? Why are you applying for a job that is more hours than you want to work?

TreadSoftlyOnMyDreams Thu 28-May-15 15:57:00

Yikes - how many kids are there ?

TreadSoftlyOnMyDreams Thu 28-May-15 16:13:28

It might be easier to secure a salary that allows you to outsource your own domestic admin and decoration grin

AMcoffeeLover Thu 28-May-15 16:16:20

2 kids and 4 big dogs.
Job was advertised as 30 hours then family increased the hours after the application was in. the agency talked the family into offering flexibility during the day to try and keep people interested.

AMcoffeeLover Thu 28-May-15 16:24:44

Good point about Friday though

AMcoffeeLover Fri 29-May-15 00:18:25

thank you to everyone who had a helpful suggestion!
I got a job offer from them smile with the compromise on hours I asked for during term time.

LUKYMUM Fri 29-May-15 01:42:03

Congratulations. I'm glad they agreed.

paxtecum Fri 29-May-15 07:56:24

Good luck.
I hope it all works out for you. It does sound exhausting.

chloeb2002 Fri 29-May-15 10:46:26

55 hrs a week??? Seriously?
Evidently no fatigue management in the UK? As a nurse I'm not permitted to work beyond 40 hrs a week.
I fear the position is for a live in slave? hmmconfused

AMcoffeeLover Fri 29-May-15 10:53:00

My partner is a paramedic and also can't work more than 40 hours a week (and thinks my hours are a bit crazy. But its covering the parents working day plus their commute time & I can see how the days end up being 11/12 hours long). I've never encountered that before, is it a legal thing or just company/nhs policy?

grabaspoon Fri 29-May-15 12:06:21

55 hours a week can be typical chloe - some fulltime nannies work 60 hours as standard.

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