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Cm - do I have to follow eyfs for a child I have as a favour (ie not paying me)

(6 Posts)
PhoebeMcPeePee Thu 03-Apr-14 12:08:31

A dear friend of mine is starting chemo soon & her mum will be caring for her little boy (1) most of the time but there are 2 hours a week she can't cover so I've offered to have him. She won't be paying me but he will be here when I have other minded children although he won't take me over allowed numbers. Does he have to become a minded child (ie with contract etc) & would I be expected to follow eyfs for him or is it ok to just look after him as a friend.

realitygone Thu 03-Apr-14 13:37:34

If you're not being paid to have the child then no I wouldn't be doing eyfs

Lucylouby Thu 03-Apr-14 22:00:20

Probably a grey area if you were to be inspected by ofsted, but personally I would say if they are not paying and you a doing it as a friend then you don't need to do eyfs, much like with your own children.

Bonkerz Fri 04-Apr-14 09:16:18

You need to ensure you have child info and contact details before he starts. Contracts not necessary and I wouldn't do eyfs links and trackers but I would maybe do a scrap book just with photos etc just to ensure I have something for him. Technically anyone can do 2 hours without being registered and ofsted won't want to see a Lj for him anyway unless he is there on inspection day wink

busyDays Fri 04-Apr-14 14:27:11

If he is only there for 2 hours a week and you are not being payed I wouldn't bother with eyfs or any other paperwork. I have a friend who is a childminder and at the time of her last inspection she only had one eyfs child, who was attending for 1.5 hours every day. The child was present when Ofsted came, but the inspector refused to even look at the learning journey and said it doesn't count as childminding if it is less than 2 hours a day. Instead of getting a grading my friend was given 'no children on roll'. The LA challenged it on her behalf but had no luck. So I would think the same applies here. Do keep in mind that you may not be covered by your insurance though.

ZuleikaD Sat 05-Apr-14 06:25:37

No, I wouldn't bother with any paperwork at all - if you weren't a CM then it wouldn't even occur to you, and it's not technically childminding if it's not more than 2 hours and definitely not for money.

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