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Neighbour Wants to help - advice please!

(12 Posts)
hiimmumma Mon 14-Aug-17 16:34:03

I'm looking for someone to look after my baby when I return to work and my neighbour approached me to say she is an ex-nursery nurse and is not starting to do some childminding and she would love to look after my Son when I return.
I would be ideal really as she lives upstairs and he hours she can do are perfect for us.

What I should be asking her for? Police check and stuff like that?
And how does nanny tax all work in this scenario? Do I need to pay that if she is a registered childminder (not sure if she is though) or maybe I should look at her more and a nannny as in I'm employing her?

Can anyone help and offer advice?

To add - I don't know her that well, only to say hi in passing but she seems lovely. We've only lived her a few months!

MrsHathaway Mon 14-Aug-17 16:37:05

She has to register with Ofsted first. Then you check her set-up - is she planning to do craft at home or go to toddler groups or do school runs? What will her fees be?

She really ought not to be offended if you find a better fit (nearer work can be more convenient than nearer home, and you might choose eg a forest or farm setting over a home-from-home). But I agree it could be a great match.

LIZS Mon 14-Aug-17 16:37:16

"Nanny" only applies if the care is in your own home. If it is working in her home and she has other children, she is a cm and self employed.

hiimmumma Mon 14-Aug-17 17:55:55

Ok thanks I'll check with her.
She has been childminding already but that's just ended because they moved away. and I think it was a family member, but I know they did pay so in theory will be set up as self employed but either way I'll find out!
It would be a good fit. The best option so far but I don't want to commit if she isn't set up properly!

Goldmandra Mon 14-Aug-17 17:58:23

Just ask for her Ofsted URN (unique reference number) so you can find her registration details online.

nannynick Mon 14-Aug-17 21:54:01

Establish where the care would be provided, if in your home then she would be your nanny and you are responsible for deducting taxes and paying employers National Insurance.

If she is a registered childminder and has told the regulator (Ofsted if in England) then she could care for children from several families at her home.

Try to spend some time getting to know her... has she babysat in the evening yet? Could be a good starting step.

jannier Fri 18-Aug-17 14:54:36

She is only a child-minder if she is registered ( she doesn't have to be looking after anyone else and may only have your child and none of her own) If she cant show you her inspection report and certificate she is working illegally and is not insured anyone using her is also breaking the law.
Most registered cm's would be very reluctant to take on close neighbours. Yes its convenient for you but often can cause stress for the cm as children want to come and play when they are closed and it can make life complicated similarly many do not like to work with friends and families....the old saying of mixing pleasure and business.

Goldmandra Fri 18-Aug-17 17:19:59

Most registered cm's would be very reluctant to take on close neighbours. Yes its convenient for you but often can cause stress for the cm as children want to come and play when they are closed and it can make life complicated similarly many do not like to work with friends and families....the old saying of mixing pleasure and business.

I'm not sure that's true of most. I have childminded more children whose parents were already friends than not. I never felt that children calling round to play was an issue, I never felt awkward about the money side of it with friends. My only issue was ever persuading friends that I could sometimes look after their children for free in return for them helping me out now and then.

I know several other childminders in a similar position and I don't know of any who feel it has caused them problems. I know that doesn't mean that none have issues with it but I'm not sure it's that big a problem.

bbcessex Fri 25-Aug-17 17:41:55

Why don't you take up references, and based on them, if suitable, have a couple of afternoons trial before you make any decisions?

jannier Mon 28-Aug-17 15:18:59

Goldmandra.....I work supporting child-minders and it is one of the biggest issues....parents sending round out of hours, going home going things and picking up late, not getting paid etc....and the fear that if they start saying no they will be reported to Ofsted. I can off the top of my head think of 10 cases this month directly related to working with friends and that's pretty typical. Neighbours and people in sight is even worse as the children can get very upset so see what is happening while they are not home and are often left because they seem happy and mum/dad assumes cm is okay as loves children.

Goldmandra Tue 29-Aug-17 15:51:47

How interesting that our experiences are so different.

Ttbb Tue 29-Aug-17 15:58:29

Make sure you ask for references

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