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Accurate studies of Breast/ Bottle pros and cons

(111 Posts)
dyzzidi Thu 26-May-05 08:32:06

HI. I really don't want a huge debate as I feel that has been done already. I am hoping some of you can post links to clinical studies of the pro's and cons. I have not made my mind up what I am going to do but would like to read some clinical research before I decide and would like to read a few different studies.

I believe it is such a personal choice that most peoples views will be slightly biased.

Sorry i do not intend to offend any of you.

OxyMoron Thu 26-May-05 08:53:37

This paper has loads of references to published research (right at the bottom) and seems relatively recent. Most of the referenced studies are mid 90's to early 00's. Even if you don't find that paper itself useful, some of the cited research might help.

HTH

OxyMoron Thu 26-May-05 08:54:15

Sorry - mid 80s to early 00s.

Pruni Thu 26-May-05 09:20:26

Message withdrawn

hunkermunker Thu 26-May-05 09:20:58

Depends on what things are important to you - some of the things I think of as pros for breastfeeding are cons for other people.

Why do you ask for clinical research in particular? A lot of the pros of bottlefeeding are (IMO) lifestyle preferences, although anybody who's read my posts on the subject before will know that I totally support women feeding however they choose (I just wish that more support was offered to those who want to continue breastfeeding).

There are plenty of research articles on the benefits of breastfeeding, but I'm not sure if the same exists for bottlefeeding.

aloha Thu 26-May-05 09:26:49

Well, I could echo Hunkermunkers post. Unless you have HIV or are on immune-suppressant medication, or have some other rare medical condition, then, if you can breastfeed (and the vast majority of women can) breastfeeding is ALWAYS better healthwise than formula feeding and there isn't any scientific evidence in the world to contradict that. There are no scientific cons to breastfeeding. There is a huge body of research about the benefits of breastfeeding - including the long term results in terms of, say, reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer (ie the kind that Kylie has) in your daughter.
The only 'cons' to breastfeeding are, as HM says, social ones which only apply to some people. I don't mind being my dd's food source, some people resent it. Some people have real psychological issues with breastfeeding, and I don't.

aloha Thu 26-May-05 09:28:34

Well, I could echo Hunkermunkers post. Unless you have HIV or are on immune-suppressant medication, or have some other rare medical condition, then, if you can breastfeed (and the vast majority of women can) breastfeeding is ALWAYS better healthwise than formula feeding and there isn't any scientific evidence in the world to contradict that. There are no scientific cons to breastfeeding. There is a huge body of research about the benefits of breastfeeding - including the long term results in terms of, say, reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer (ie the kind that Kylie has) in your daughter.
The only 'cons' to breastfeeding are, as HM says, social ones which only apply to some people. I don't mind being my dd's food source, some people resent it. Some people have real psychological issues with breastfeeding, and I don't.

aloha Thu 26-May-05 09:30:57

If you google 'breastfeeding health study' you will come up with loads of stuff you can study at your leisure.
Like this:
Study: Breastfeeding lowers blood pressure

BRISTOL, England, May 24 (UPI) -- Breastfeeding has a beneficial impact on a child's blood pressure, a British study suggests.

 Related Headlines

Health Tips ... from UPI (May 24, 2005) -- EDUCATION PUTS WOMEN TO SLEEP Women have higher rates of insomnia than men, but the better educated a woman is, the more likely she is to ... > full story

Study: milk good for heart disease, stroke (May 23, 2005) -- A University of Bristol, England, study suggests a milk-rich diet does not increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, and might even be ... > full story

Study: at-risk children not lead tested (May 10, 2005) -- A University of Michigan study suggests children at the greatest risk for lead poisoning are the least likely to undergo necessary testing. The ... > full story

Study: Drug combos best for heart disease (May 5, 2005) -- A British study finds that heart disease patients who take a combination of three drugs are more likely to survive than those taking a single ... > full story

Older risk factors key in kidney disease (April 12, 2005) -- A U.S. study released Tuesday suggests treatment of older kidney-disease patients should focus on controlling traditional heart-disease risk ... > full story

Researchers at the University of Bristol determined breastfeeding might be as effective at lowering blood pressure as are low-salt diets or increased physical activity,

And the longer a child is breastfed, the greater the benefits for its blood pressure, the researchers said. When it comes to diseases related to high blood pressure, breastfeeding "is of public health importance," they concluded.

More than 2,000 children between the ages of 9 and 15 from Estonia and Denmark were surveyed. The findings were similar for children in both countries.

According to UNICEF, an estimated 1.5 million babies worldwide die each year because they are not breastfed.

The study is detailed in the June issue of the British medical journal Archives of Disease in Childhood,

Copyright 2005 by United Press International. All Rights Reserved.

oliveoil Thu 26-May-05 09:31:19

The facts are that breastfeeding is best for baby, period, numerous studies have shown it. However, I found it easy with my first but absolutely hell with my second (no idea why) and stopped as soon as she would tolerate a bottle.

You got it right in your second sentence - it is a personal choice so if I were you, why don't you try it and see how things go? If you decide to bottle feed, make your decision and move on, no recriminations or regrets, guilt or whatever.

This will turn into a debate by the way which is why I have got my twopeneth in first so I can run off.

aloha Thu 26-May-05 09:33:44

I found this news a big incentive to keep breastfeeding my daughter. Premenopausal breast cancer is the type that Kylie has.

News-Medical.Net
Birth weight and breastfeeding in infancy may affect premenopausal breast cancer risk
Women's Health News
Published: Thursday, 19-May-2005
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Premenopausal women who were heavier than average at birth or had not been breastfed as infants appear to be at increased risk for developing breast cancer, epidemiologists at the University at Buffalo's School of Public health and Health Professions have found.

Results of the study, which showed no association between birth weight and breastfeeding in infancy and postmenopausal breast-cancer risk, were reported at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting in Anaheim, Calif.

"The intrauterine and neonatal life periods have been suggested as critical windows in mammary gland development," said Maddalena Barba, M.D., research instructor in the UB Department of Social and Preventive Medicine and lead researcher on the study.

"In utero and early childhood exposures might affect breast cancer risk by altering the hormonal environment of the developing fetus and young infant through mechanisms not yet completely clarified."

Barba and colleagues from UB's School of Public Health and Health Professions analyzed data collected from 2,382 women participating in the Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer Study conducted from 1996-2001 during in-person, computer-assisted interviews. Complete information on the exposures of interest was available for 845 participants newly diagnosed with breast cancer during the study period who served as cases, and for 1,573 matched controls.

Researchers compared cases and controls, taking into consideration already well-recognized breast-cancer risk factors such as age, education, body-mass index, history of benign breast disease, family history of cancer, months of lactation, age at first menstrual period, age at first pregnancy, number of pregnancies and age at menopause for postmenopausal women.

Results showed that premenopausal women whose birth weight was greater than 8.5 pounds, and premenopausal women who had not been breast fed as infants, had an almost two-fold risk of developing breast cancer when compared to premenopausal women whose weight at birth was 5.5-7 pounds (reference category) and who had been breast fed.

None of these variables showed a relationship with postmenopausal breast cancer. Birth order was not associated with breast cancer risk in pre- or postmenopausal women.

"Our results support the hypothesis that early life events impact women's breast-cancer risk later in life," said Barba. "Further research based on targeted studies is needed to reach a deeper understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms."

Additional researchers on the study were Susan E. McCann, Ph.D., Jing Nie, Ph.D., Saverio Stranges, M.D., Ph.D., Barbara Fuhrman, Maurizio Trevisan, M.D., and Jo L. Freudenheim, Ph.D., from the Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, and Paola Muti, M.D., formerly at UB, currently at the Italian National Cancer Institute Regina Elena in Rome, Italy.

The research was supported in part by grants from the U.S. Army and the American-Italian Cancer Foundation.

The University at Buffalo is a premier research-intensive public university, the largest and most comprehensive campus in the State University of New York.

OxyMoron Thu 26-May-05 09:35:13

Pruni - sorry if I offended, yes you're right, it is a review article, and does have an emotive title, but I really just posted it as I think it's a useful link to a lot of previous research. As I said, the article itself may not be useful, and doesn't have to be taken on face value. As dizzidi said, there's always a lot of bias in these publications. I really just thought the reserch might be useful. The full references are there, allowing the reader to look up the original data, study methodologies, etc.
Totally didn't mean to offend, and absolutely don't want an argument either. So I hope I've cleared up my motivation for posting and think I will now bow out of this thread.

hunkermunker Thu 26-May-05 09:35:55

One thing to bear in mind is if you decide to bottlefeed from birth and change your mind, breastfeeding will be much harder than had you breastfed from birth.

But if you begin by breastfeeding, you can always make the swap at a later date. If you do start to breastfeed, bear in mind that it can take six weeks to establish your supply and for it to be "right" each time you feed - though not everybody experiences this by any means and for a lot of women it happens much quicker.

dyzzidi Thu 26-May-05 13:05:22

I am concerned with a couple of things really.

1. I have been advised I may have major surgery directly after a c-section to remove a v large fibroid. this is quite a 'bloody' operation and I will be ill for some time and have blood transfusions etc. I don't think I will be able to breastfeed whilst on heavy medication etc.

2. My DP works away and will only be home for a few weeks before going overseas, I feel it is very important for him to bond with the baby and believe being able to 'look after and feed' will aid this.

I am aware of all the breast is best hype but will do what I decide is best for not only baby but myself and DP.

As for why clinical reports I find ones done by SMA (bottle milk) or the NCT will not show both sides of the argument.

emkana Thu 26-May-05 13:11:16

There are many many ways that your dp can bond with the baby even if you're breastfeeding. He can change nappies and bath the baby, for example. And my dh carried our dd's round for ages and ages after the feeding, and it was wonderful and helpful and lovely for all of us that he did that, and he has never ever felt that he missed out on bonding with our dd's.
There are only very very few medications which actually make it impossible to breastfeed.
As others have said, in terms of health for mother and baby there is absolutely nothing that speaks for formula feeding.
I can only say with the others - give it a go, you can always switch to bottles later if you have to.tyh

oliveoil Thu 26-May-05 13:14:26

1. Check with hosp on compatibility of medication with b/feeding, they may have various options. I had a section with dd1 and all the med I had was ok, realise you are having another op but ykwim.

2. If you do decide to b/feed you can express milk for dh to give to baby in bottle if you want. I insisted on this as I was about to fall over through lack of sleep.

3. Breast is best but not if it sends the mother round the bend, you are right that your interest needs to be taken into acccount.

Having said that, your interests will mean poop all to the baby in the first few months as it is the most demaning time.

dyzzidi Thu 26-May-05 13:15:05

Yes but If I am flat on my back after major surgery having blood transfusions with the pain meds do you really advise putting the stress of breastfeeding on my body and the nursing staff.

My DP bonding is something which is on my mind at the moment only a contributing factor rather than a main cause.

oliveoil Thu 26-May-05 13:16:23

Am I right in thinking you have already made your mind up?

Iklboo Thu 26-May-05 13:16:47

I definitely WANT to breastfeed - and I'm signed up for breastfeeding classes later on in PG (what on EARTH are they going to give us for homework?). My mum's a real downer though - "you wouldn't breastfeed when you were born, your baby might noy, have you thought of that?" Well mum, I probably didn't like the taste of 40 fags a day. (sorry, ranting!). I suppose I'll just have to see how it goes won't I?

moondog Thu 26-May-05 13:16:57

dyzzidi..my dh works abroad.Couldn't make it back in time for ds's birth and had to go off again very soon after he was born.
I breastfed/feed and there were no bonding problems whatsoever! He was however able to do a lot for me which made for a harmonious marital relationship!

Which would you prefer-getting on with something while he gives the baby a bottle,or relaxing and snuggling up in a big cosy chair to feed your baby,while dh trots around,rustling up drinks,snacks and administering the occasional foot or shoulder massage?

bundle Thu 26-May-05 13:17:05

i was on pretty hefty pain relief after both my c/s and breastfed successfully

moondog Thu 26-May-05 13:18:21

Iklboo,our health authority prints pamphlets especially for grandparents like your mother!

dyzzidi Thu 26-May-05 13:21:31

No I am just unsure. Every other person I ask says Oh breast is best and lays guilt trips on me for even considering bottle.

I also read in one of the pregancy books you can't express until after 2 weeks. So that has confused me further. A lot of info has been shared on here about Drugs given in Labour can stay in the babys system for 24 hrs etc. I keep thinking god if I breastfeed will I have a drugged up baby for a week!

I have had major surgery before and last time I was not allowed out of bed for 1 week. Will the nursing staff on a surgical ward bring the baby to me for every feed?

Sorry its all so many questions I suppose in reality I am looking for a way to breastfeed. If thats not possible I am looking for a guilt free bottle feeding hospital stay.

moondog Thu 26-May-05 13:21:46

Pruni,I think you're being unfair to OxyMoron.
I've had a look at her reference,and hell,it certainly isn't one journo's opinion. The title reflects the findings.

Truth sometimes hurts unfortunately...

ZolaPola Thu 26-May-05 13:22:15

If you have all that going on after having given birth you really shouldn't feel you're letting yr baby down in any way if you can't/choose not to b/f. Is there someone at the hosp who can advise on b/fing with the medication you'll be on so that you know in advance how realistic an option that is? there are some excellent formuala milks out there - hipp organic for instance, or if you can provide breast milk but can't feed it directly to your babe, they should be able to help you express. IME bottle-feeding was a great bonding experience for my dh btw.
Good luck with it all anyway.

oliveoil Thu 26-May-05 13:24:19

If you can't b/feed then you can't. No guilt needed. If you choose to bottle feed, then you do. No guilt needed either.

Also, I was in hosp for 5 days after my section and the staff were fab, picking up dd1 from her cot for the first day and manhandling my boobs into positon to teach my how to feed. So if you need assistance I am sure it will be there for you.

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