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Colic in EBF- what worked for us

(5 Posts)
TheNewShmoo Mon 03-Feb-14 21:27:00

Just wanted to share this article as seemed to provide the key for helping my 11 week old get over his horrendous colic. Sure I knew that you're supposed to empty one breast before offering the other, but I was never really thorough about it.

So what happens: breast switching results in the baby taking frequent, large-volume, low-fat [high sugar] feeds, which in turn lead to rapid emptying of the stomach into the large intestine. If too much gets there too fast, there is not enough of the enzyme lactase to break the sugar in the milk (lactose) down. The gut turns into a malfunctioning brewery, with fermentation of the sugar in the excess milk creating gas and explosive poos. The crying, arched back, rigid tummy and irritability of colic follow.

Now I keep offering the same one until DS lets me know it's well and truly empty- can go through quite a few hours doing this. I have a different baby now- astounded.

Have a read:

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2005/mar/30/familyandrelationships.healthandwellbeing

Mamabear12 Mon 03-Feb-14 21:41:30

Interesting. Thanks for sharing article!

Cakeismymaster Mon 03-Feb-14 21:59:48

Yes I followed the 3 hour rule - same side for every feed in a 3 hour period. Then switch to other side. Is also known as block feeding (I think!)

lilyaldrin Tue 04-Feb-14 10:02:15

That article isn't talking about block feeding (a technique to reduce an oversupply) but more generally that you should follow the baby's cues, letting it come off the breast spontaneously rather than enforcing a switch after a set time period. Block feeding is used to correct a specific problem rather than as part of "normal" feeding iyswim.

This article is quite clear in foremilk/hindmilk and when to switch sides www.analyticalarmadillo.co.uk/2010/07/foremilkhindmilk-and-lot-of-confusion.html

TheNewShmoo Wed 05-Feb-14 00:35:10

Useful article Lily- thanks.

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