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1 year old speech

(16 Posts)
lananzack Sun 15-Jan-17 12:02:01

Just wondering, upon turning 1 year old (on average) how many words should they be saying? If any? What were/are your experiences??

user1477282676 Sun 15-Jan-17 12:03:04

When you say one, do you mean 12 months old or closer to two years? For eg. is your child 18 months old? Or 12 months? There's a big difference.

Artandco Sun 15-Jan-17 12:04:03

Neither of mine said anything really at 1 year. Speech started and developed fast between 2-2 1/2 years.

ElspethFlashman Sun 15-Jan-17 12:08:40

You mean at 12 months old?

Precisely fuck all.

There's always the odd child who has a word or two, but they're highly unusual at that age.

lananzack Sun 15-Jan-17 12:09:28

User147 anywhere on the 1 year spectrum, really. Just interested in hearing about experiences with speech early on. My daughter has just turned 1 this month and whilst she is not yet walking, she's saying several words, and I don't know whether to be quite shocked or not. X

user1477282676 Sun 15-Jan-17 12:10:48

Oh they do vary. My first DD spoke at about 12 months but my next DD didn't say much till about 18 months.

LauraPalmersBodybag Sun 15-Jan-17 12:11:50

My friend is a speech and language therapist. She says it's unusual for them to be speaking at 12 months...maybe the odd word but not to worry either way. My 12 month chatters and makes all sorts of sounds but no discernible words. Think between 1-2 is when it starts to develop.

ElspethFlashman Sun 15-Jan-17 12:12:28

Girls are anecdotally much earlier talkers than boys.

When my DS was 18 months old he had one word. The little girls in his nursery were a lot more advanced.

Still, your DD is pretty ahead of the curve!

lananzack Sun 15-Jan-17 12:27:15

Oh, I didn't realise with having not really been around young children other than my daughter! It seems she's jumping the gun a bit then. Feeling really proud now. Gonna have a chatterbox on my hands. X

ElspethFlashman Sun 15-Jan-17 12:45:54

It could mean she's a slow walker through. They tend to develop one skill at a time. But not to worry!

mscongeniality Sun 15-Jan-17 12:49:14

I started talking really early at 11 months. My son is 20 months now and only has the odd word. Everyone tells me girls are usually much quicker at talking than boys though.

Summerdays2014 Sun 15-Jan-17 12:50:36

My son was one this week. He started walking at just before 11 months but has no words at all yet.

SparklyFuckingBusinessFairy Mon 16-Jan-17 15:49:39

I was speaking in little sentences by about 18 months, reading at 2 and English was always my star subject at school. I wanted DD to be the same, but at 16 months she has about 3 words that all sound the same and is currently banging her head against her ottoman and laughing about it... I blame her dad!! grin

TheCaptainsCat Tue 17-Jan-17 17:32:28

My DD started talking with a few words at 12ish months, had about 100 words at 18 months, has about 200 words, uses sentences and can count now at 22 months. It does make me proud, but I was the same and am definitely not a genius grin

TheDowagerCuntess Tue 17-Jan-17 17:38:03

Girls are usually vastly ahead of boys in the speaking stakes - many are very early talkers and often highly conversational by two years of age. Many boys are still only cobbling a couple of mispronounced words together at three.

It's no real signifier of anything, as it all evens out in the wash.

skankingpiglet Wed 18-Jan-17 23:42:14

DD1 said her first word (dog) at 10.5mo (I remember so clearly as it happened in a week that was otherwise awful and really tough), closely followed by a second (Dadda) a few weeks later. By 12mo she had been kind enough to add 'Mumma' too (I know my place). She seemed fairly average amongst her little friends tbh.

I agree it's after 2 it really takes off. DD1 was coming out with at least one new word a day from two. She's 2.6 now, and the last month she has begun to start speaking in complete sentences (8-odd words? "I don't want to go to pre-school today") and use longer words ('interesting' seems to be one she's particularly proud of this week). I can have a conversation with her now, which is lovely smile

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