Teaching DD to say "th"

(14 Posts)
Elfontheedge Wed 06-Apr-16 16:59:09

DD doesn't say her "th" in words properly, only a "f" sound. How can I best teach her to "th" properly? I had hoped that just setting a good example with my speech would be enough but DP can't say th either so not helping! She is 4.5 so I don't know if she will just get it when she is a bit older or if I should try to teach her now.

G1raffe Wed 06-Apr-16 17:00:10

Mine can say it but don't simply as the local accent says muver, bruver... It droves me nuts.

NaughtToThreeSadOnions Wed 06-Apr-16 17:03:35

I may be corrected on this but I think the "th" sound isn't completely grasped until 5 or 6.
I think it's one of the hardest to position the tongue correctly for.

G1raffe Wed 06-Apr-16 17:07:38

If so it's just my oldest I should be getting cross with and not my youngest (4.5!) I do try to model and show the th and v with tongue or lower lip...

NaughtToThreeSadOnions Wed 06-Apr-16 17:09:26

It seems that children might develop the th sound till 7 according to this!
mommyspeechtherapy.com/wp-content/downloads/forms/sound_development_chart.pdf

drinkingtea Wed 06-Apr-16 17:10:34

Mine have all struggled with it - I have always assumed because we live abroad and outside the home they speak German, which has no "th" sound.

My older 2 (nearly 9 and nearly 11) can say it fine now but nearly 9 year old has to be reminded and 5 year old usually says f. I make him say a really exaggerated th with exaggerated tongue placement and make the sound for ages at the beginning of ththththththank you from time to time, which luckily he finds hilarious.

Correct and play around with it sometimes to make sure she can say it, but don't sweat it, at least for a year or so.

I don't think just having it modelled is enough, you have to correct/ practice a bit, but keep it light and laugh about it or she'll refuse to pronounce it on purpose grin

G1raffe Wed 06-Apr-16 17:14:08

Mine 4.5 year old can say thank-you fine though. it's when it's in a sound like mother....

Elfontheedge Wed 06-Apr-16 17:14:11

Ha she will do it on purpose yes. She has started talking like one of her friends in this flat monotone sometimes and that drives me mad too. I'm trying to ignore that though as I think she'll grow out of it when they go to different schools in September. Ok I'll not worry yet then, just make it fun for her smile

dementedpixie Wed 06-Apr-16 17:14:58

Dd/ds got told it was a 'cheeky' sound as you stick your tongue out to make it

Chilver Wed 06-Apr-16 17:18:29

Mine (just 4) can say the 'th' when it's words like 'them' but still says 'i'm not free' instead of 'three'!!!
We even got on a bus last week and as we got on (nowhere near where we live) I asked the bus driver 'is she still free?' (meaning is she young enough to travel for free) and she piped up indignantly 'i'm NOT free, I'm four!'!!!

slebmum1 Wed 06-Apr-16 17:21:12

DTs are 4.5 - they can do it but are lazy about. They are learning in their phonics lessons to push their tongues forwards to make the right sound. I'm in SE London and my children will not grow up saying free for three or roof for Ruth! If the f sounds changes the meaning of the sentence I pick them up on it.

slebmum1 Wed 06-Apr-16 17:27:21

DTs are 4.5 - they can do it but are lazy about. They are learning in their phonics lessons to push their tongues forwards to make the right sound. I'm in SE London and my children will not grow up saying free for three or roof for Ruth! If the f sounds changes the meaning of the sentence I pick them up on it.

DessertOrDesert Wed 06-Apr-16 17:39:38

Thank-you for that link.
We have TH, but not CH - shocholate cake is for pudding in this house...

pilates Wed 06-Apr-16 17:42:52

Yes, sticking your tongue out when saying "th" works well.

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