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DD suddenly unbareable

(7 Posts)
Cheesecrumpets01 Tue 26-Jan-16 16:18:28

She is 3 and a half and up until about 2 weeks ago she was genuinely as good as gold, laid back, happy, joy to be around and did things when she was asked ect.

It started with very hyper behaviour, not sitting still, running around in the house and standing on toys ect in the process, generally being heavy handed with everything which is very odd for her.....

Then suddenly developed a snotty nose and became the devil child.

She is crying over literally everything, every word that comes out her mouth, even in just general conversation, is said in a whiny voice like she is on the verge or a break down.
She dosent listen, we are calling her name 3/4 times before she even acknowledges us.
She asks questions but then talks over us before she hears the answer.
I am constantly asking 3/4 times to do basic things which she usually just does by her self.

I am constantly telling her off, for silly behaviour/naughtiness/not listening/tantrums none of which is normal for her. We want to spend time together but I find my self taking her to pre school because I can't bare on more minute of crying and the constant battle.

Any ideas where this has come from and why she might be suddenly behaving like it?

Ferguson Tue 26-Jan-16 16:41:16

Might she not be FEELING ILL, if she has a snotty nose?

Cheesecrumpets01 Tue 26-Jan-16 16:57:07

Possibly, but again it isn't like her to play up even when ill. She has been in and out of hospital all her life and she has never reacted like that to being ill, even when she was very poorly. Seems odd a little cold, with no temp or anything would create this behaviour.

P1nkP0ppy Tue 26-Jan-16 17:03:30

Is her hearing being affected by the cold?
I'd get her checked out by your GP before considering anything else, especially if she's been a poorly child all her life.

Ferguson Tue 26-Jan-16 17:18:30

This is a copy of information I have sent to other parents in similar situations; it may help, or it may be less relevant for you:

QUOTE:
My theory is that as babies mature, and become more aware to their environment, and start to realise they might have CHOICES in their life, they become less passive and less cooperative.

For a year or two, their little body has been picked up, put down, dressed. undressed, bathed, and stuck into bed, with virtually NO choice or control on their part. At 2 or 3, they realise maybe they can INFLUENCE some of these things!

So I think parents have to be as patient as possible, and accept some of these developing behaviours. Try to avoid 'battles', and use your superior skills and understanding, to smooth their path towards maturity.
UNQUOTE.

waitingforsomething Tue 26-Jan-16 19:40:39

Sounds like she's ill if it's arrived with a snotty nose out of the blue. Take her to the gp perhaps she has an ear infection or something. Otherwise she may have a virus and is just knackered

strawberrybubblegum Wed 27-Jan-16 00:14:55

I find that DD reacts a LOT to my emotions. That means that if her behaviour takes a dip (for whatever reason eg tiredness, being under the weather, just a bit of grumpiness) then we can get in a downward spiral of me telling her off, which makes her behaviour worse, which makes me more impatient with her, which makes her behaviour even worse, etc.

Also worth noting that children tend to whine when they feel powerless.

Defo take her to the gp, but if all seems well then maybe have some focused time for getting your connection back. Block out some relaxed time together, with chores on the back burner and nothing you need to hurry her along for. Lots of playful interactions, tickles, chasing games - whatever she likes. Cuddles and babying if she wants it. If she is anything like DD you may have to do countless (repetitive) games of shops, doctors and babies with as much enthusiasm as you can find. grin With luck, a bit of concentrated mummy time will bring back her mojo!

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