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20 month old nightmare mealtimes

(9 Posts)
RL35 Sat 03-Jan-15 19:57:59

Hi my 20 month old son is horrendous at sitting down at the table for meals. Whilst he eats well and healthily he has become worse and won't sit still, wants to get down. So I have tried for a while but then he gets down and there is nothing else to eat for him.
Lunches out are a complete nightmare and so stressful...
What can I do? My husband and I are arguing over what to do so adding to the stress.
He says he is so naughty but I say it's just a phase.. He is teething, but had been like it for a while...
He has a booster but won't sit in it, asking for cuddles all the time which I know is a ploy to get down....
Help!!!

ruth4321 Sat 03-Jan-15 20:13:50

My son is 17 months and he's the same. He's ok at dinner time when me and his dad sit round the table but as soon as he is finished he says out out. I just tend to feed him on my knee sat in front of the tv or chase him round shoving spoonfuls into his mouth at breakfast and lunch. It's not ideal but as long as he's eating I'm sure they will get there once they are older and can sit still for longer!

RL35 Sat 03-Jan-15 20:20:40

Can you go out for lunch with him?

RL35 Sat 03-Jan-15 20:21:52

I used to let him watch postman pat and he ate as good as gold as he was distracted... But I have stopped that as I didn't want that to become a habit...

feekerry Sat 03-Jan-15 20:48:48

Hey op.
My dd 2.5yr often says she wants down etc. doesn't want to eat.
If it were me I would really act like I didn't give 2 hoots. So if ds says he wants to get down I would say fine off you go but you won't be able to eat your dinner. And change topic of conversation. If he gets down I would ignore whatever he is doing and carry on eating at the table talking about something else. If he starts to show interest at table ask if he wants to join you again to finish his dinner. If he does/doesn't dont make a big deal either way.
If he shows no interest in coming back to table, once you have finished eating I would say to him you are going to clear plates up, does he want to come back. If no, bin his dinner. End of. Don't mention it again. If he complains later he is hungry then explain he needs to sit at the table next time to finish his meal.
I personally wouldn't get into any arguments over whether he sits there or not. Dinner is eaten at the table. He either sits and eats or he doesn't.
This is what I do with dd and 7 times out of 10 she will ask to come back to table as its boring sitting on the floor on your own when everyone else is eating and chatting away at the table

RL35 Sat 03-Jan-15 20:52:38

Thank you for your reply.. He is 20 months old so slightly younger - do you not think he is too young for this?

feekerry Sat 03-Jan-15 21:02:47

Ye sorry I realised after I posted there was quite a lot of explaining involved in what I do and your ds is a bit younger.
My dd has always been a fussy eater since 6m. Pushing plate away, wanting to get down etc. I think the key is to just not be bothered by it. He is at an age where he is trying to exert a bit of control and if you and dh are arguing about it etc he is going to see he is creating some reaction.
If he really wants to get down then fine. But if he does I would make you sitting at the table seem really
Interesting (lots of laughing and funny conversation) make him being down really boring. Make sure toys etc not in reach. Turn tv to something boring. And ignore.
He knows where his dinner is!!

championnibbler Sat 03-Jan-15 21:08:43

feekerry - i totally agree.
if you don't eat your meals at mealtimes, then you get nowt in between.

stressbucket1 Sat 03-Jan-15 21:34:55

Tbh I would let him watch a bit of tv if it works for a bit or give him a couple of toys to play with. He is too young to be naughty but obviously finds it hard sitting when there is so much other fun stuff to do. Do you sit with him?

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