Talk

Advanced search

How much tv is too much for a 15 month old

(91 Posts)
Cupcakemummy85 Fri 28-Sep-12 09:58:27

My dd is nearly 15 months and has been ill this week so I've let her watch her absolute favourite peppa pig. It's been on pretty much non stop. I do try and play with her but obviously being ill she isn't really in the mood to play. She does do her own thing for a bit and then watches it. I used to watch tv as a child and it didn't do anything to me but I worry as my mother in law beloved children should be outside playing and won't let my dd watch any tv what so ever in her house. How much does everyone else's children watch. My dd is a bit of a nightmare ill, won't eat much, complains all the time, standard for a child so tv does keep her happy.

ZuleikaD Fri 28-Sep-12 10:28:04

The guidance is no more than half an hour per day for under 2s because it can adversely affect language development. You say that you watched tv as a child but I would guess 'when you were a child' means about four or five years old and up as there wasn't nearly the amount of tv aimed at babies and toddlers then as there is now. However if it's a one-off because she's been ill then it's a bit different.

My two (3yo and 2) don't watch anything except a couple of episodes of Ivor the Engine or Bagpuss at weekends as we don't have tv but we're unusual.

TittyWhistles Fri 28-Sep-12 10:33:16

It won't hurt her for this short time while she's poorly but IMO sleep is far more beneficial to recovery and just zoning out in front of the tv might be preventing her from getting some good sleep. Can you put some relaxing music on instead?

issimma Fri 28-Sep-12 10:37:47

Dd is 19mo and very rarely watched tv until the last month or so. Despite this, one of her first words was Beebies and she likes to bang my laptop shouting 'Peppa'.
I let her have as much as she likes before 8am (not while eating breakfast or getting dressed) as I am too knackered then to care and can put a wash on, sort the kitchen etc in peace. She also has it on after 6pm, after tea and once she's ready for bed (so really only watches itng). She goes to bed after itng.
I use the tv in the day occasionally - generally 5 min bursts when I need to get our stuff together to go out - makes it much easier and quicker - but am trying to stop this completely.

Cupcakemummy85 Fri 28-Sep-12 10:39:31

She is quite hard work to get to sleep. I put her down for a map and she cries everytime,(which makes her even more bunged up) it's sort of part of the routine, lol. Normally she watches tv in the morning mixed with playing, then we get out in the afternoon and after her dinner she will watch a tiny bit mixed with playing with mummy and daddy. I do feel guilty letting her watch so much but she enjoys it in the morning and I can get a few bits done. I feel quite bad now sad

Lambethlil Fri 28-Sep-12 10:48:53

Normally she watches tv in the morning ^mixed with playing^

That would be the first thing to stop! Take the batteries out of the remote and tell her she can watch an episode after lunch or before her bath/ bedtime, whatever her routine is.

As Zuleika says the guidance is no more than half an hour a day. It was much easier to stick to that in the past because there was only the odd half hour broadcast, so sympathies but, it really isn't good for their development.

Cupcakemummy85 Fri 28-Sep-12 10:58:44

I'm not sure I totally agree with the development thing. I mean, she is doing just fine on that front and I know other people kids that watch DVDs all day! It is just because she is ill and when she is better it will go back to only the mornings. We do a lot of stuff when she is well in the afternoon but morning time is not good as she gets over tired!! And we did not have any success at mum and tots (disaster, unfriendly mums, another story) At least she doesn't sit there and watch Jeremy Kyle. I can't play with her 24/7 and she needs a clean house and food on the table and that is down to me. I need to stop being silly and stop being paranoid.

GobblersKnob Fri 28-Sep-12 11:04:02

Mine use to occasionally watch Baby Einstein DVD alone when very tired or poorly, but only for half an hour or so.

With a poorly one of that age we would have played quietly or read.

Mine didn't watch any proper 'tv' until three-ish.

Girlsville Fri 28-Sep-12 11:11:17

oP don't feel bad. Dd1 was 15 months when dd2 was born, and for the first few weeks I had to resort to a lot of cbeebeis while I was feeding dd2 . We then got back to normal and she hardly watched any tv once dd2 was 6 weeks or so. It didn't harm her development at all ...... Her language is, and always has been very advanced, and she now happily sits and does puzzles for hours on end. She is almost three now and watched about 45 min during the day while dd2 has her lunchtime nap, as it gives her a chance to recharge.
Long term I don't think it's great to have non stop tv but short term it's fine, and as they get older they understand that they can't just have tv whenever they want.

Cupcakemummy85 Fri 28-Sep-12 11:19:06

I'm actually pregnant at the moment so her being ill I don't have the most energy or the patience of a saint either right now. I'm sure once she is better like I said it will return to normal but mornings are fine with me as we r always busy doing stuff everyday once her morning map is done. Think she is a bit young for puzzles but we do try. I always try different things to get her mind active. Some are successful and some aren't, I'm learning as we go along lol. I've not exactly taken to motherhood like duck to water so issues like tv and feeding etc will always come up :s right now whilst she is ill peppa is a god send lol. My hormones are making me a very impatient mummy these days tbh!!

ZuleikaD Fri 28-Sep-12 11:33:31

At 14 months I wouldn't expect her to have many words yet but the point about language development is that it's like an iceberg - before the first words surface there has to be a huge amount of heard language underneath. And unfortunately tv doesn't count because under-2s don't recognise people on the tv as people. It has to be from a live person in the same room. So at 14 months you wouldn't be able to tell whether her language development had been affected as there's nothing to show it yet. The guidance is there so that children don't have speech and language delay when they get older - it can cause all kinds of communication and frustration/behaviour issues if they can't express themselves. And all too often people deal with bad behaviour with more tv - which makes the whole situation worse.

Cupcakemummy85 Fri 28-Sep-12 11:42:37

I understand completely but it's not like she watches it all day and I'm sure a few peppa pigs and playing with me won't harm her language. I think sometimes people go a bit too ott with their kids and I can be guilty panicking about everything but this time I think it's best to just relax about it. She is ill abd once she is better she will b back to her normal self playing. I'm normally am a really worrier about everything so for me to b relaxed about this it's a pretty big milestone lol

issimma Fri 28-Sep-12 11:43:20

Much of the TV-affecting-development-research stems from children who were plonked in front of the TV all day for months or years, not for a couple of hours short-term. Sounds like you do lots of other stuff, OP, to stimulate your DD, so I wouldn't worry. She's ill, you're pregnant - enjoy Peppa!

Viviennemary Fri 28-Sep-12 11:47:39

I'd say usually not more than an hour or so a day. But if she's been ill then I think it's fair enough to watch all this TV if it is giving her comfort.

MainlyMaynie Fri 28-Sep-12 11:48:29

I'd be interested to see some more up to date research on TV watching and other screens. My DS recognises and interacts with his Grandparents on Skype, how do they differentiate that from TV?

issimma Fri 28-Sep-12 11:49:46

I'm a linguistics geek mainly and was wondering that. DD chats regularly on Skype to her GPs and certainly recognises them.

Cupcakemummy85 Fri 28-Sep-12 11:56:41

Ha ha how funny, mine does too and to my sister. She knows it's them and doesn't stop her baby babble mixed with actual words. I think in total she probably only watches an hour max spaced out between morning and evening, peppa is a very short programme after all.

FruitSaladIsNotPudding Fri 28-Sep-12 11:59:16

Hmm, I don't think a 15mo should be watching tv on a regular basis really. OK if they are ill, or if you are struggling with a newborn, but not every day when she's an only child. Sorry.

I let dd watch tv while I make dinner/sort house in evening. Started this at about 2yo I think. She watches about 1.5hours max and tbh I'm not totally happy about it, but it makes my life so much easier. Do feel guilty though, I really think it does them no good at all at this age.

FruitSaladIsNotPudding Fri 28-Sep-12 12:00:32

That said, I'm sure second/third children watch loads! I'm pregnant and am sure I won't be able to be as precious about this one. We'll see!

ZuleikaD Fri 28-Sep-12 12:02:04

I'd guess maybe if it's Skype and their grandparents are actually interacting with them then it's different from cartoons/Night Garden type stuff?

NimChimpsky Fri 28-Sep-12 12:11:28

DS has never watched television. He does talk to his grandparents on skype though and at nearly 13mo he knows who they are, shouts 'hello grandad', waves, tries to give them things etc.

DD is 5yo and she watches the odd film at the weekend. Ivor and Bagpuss here too. smile And blooming Shrek.

issimma Fri 28-Sep-12 12:11:45

A lot of cbeebies is far too old for young toddlers, so that's why we have no TV in the day. And it's bloody boring for parents - that helps only use it in desperate times!
Although this afternoon I have to stay home from 2 til 9 waiting for a delivery. Gah! DD won't nap, I'm also pg, and v unsure of what we'll do! It's raining too [aaaagh].

MainlyMaynie Fri 28-Sep-12 12:13:49

But if the research that says they don't recognise people on the TV as people and therefore don't take in the language, surely that would be true for Skype as well? It makes me doubt the research. As does the fact that I sing something like heads, shoulders, knees and toes to DS in one language and he sees it on Baby TV in another language, but appears to understand both equally.

forevergreek Fri 28-Sep-12 12:37:07

Would she nap in pram? Our little one is the same age and has hour nap am and 2 hour nap after lunch. Would def sleep more when ill. Maybe you could go for a walk and she will fall asleep and you can grab a coffee or lunch somewhere quietly. Win win for everyone.

If she's ill etc as one off it's fine, but I would try not to make a habit of excess tv. I don't watch tv myself everyone so I wouldn't expect a baby/ toddler to. I also have other things to do day to day but they play with toys themselves, look at books, join me in 'helping' with washing/ cooking etc. them I play with them also.

Maybe a structure to day may help her settle to sleep and learn to entertain herself a little ( especially if another baby on way)
We roughly:
Up dressed/ breakfast
Play together/ puzzles etc until about half 9
Go out for the morning
Home for lunch, followed by nap
Afternoon, an hour or so they entertain themselves
Then park or walk around block/ to shops ( helps tire out- 5 min adult walk is 20 mins gone at 15 month ol pace- put in reins do you don't have to run after)
Home, more playing alone whilst I sort dinner
Dinner
Play together/ read, then bath/ bed

Means you don't absentmindedly pop tv on etc, as if you want her to have you could always schedule in at a convinent time for you ( maybe when you do dinner or something)

I think getting out more/ her learning to play alone for a while will save your sanity with 2 little ones ( we have 14 month gap here)

Lambethlil Fri 28-Sep-12 13:38:41

OP the guidance is no more than half an hour a day.

Obviously there are times when your needs and hers- tired, ill etc. mean that there is good justification for overiding that guidance- just stay vigilant that it doesn't become the norm.

I have to place a big disclaimer here. My DCs are teenagers and were born pre CeeBeebies. It was a great support to me having half an hour toddler programming, then nothing of interest for them. It's much much harder when appropriate programming is always there.

Join the discussion

Join the discussion

Registering is free, easy, and means you can join in the discussion, get discounts, win prizes and lots more.

Register now