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Autism / Aspergers - choosing junior school

(2 Posts)
MINIBondGirl Thu 20-Oct-11 13:01:11

Hi All,

I'm after a bit of advice with regard to choosing the next school. DS is currently 6 and in yr 2. He is waiting to be assessed for Aspergers and is in the process of getting a SEN but which I fear will not be in place in time for applying for his next school.

We have been advised that a small school is better as he has a meltdown over long corridors and playing fields etc and is used to a very small school.

My question is - if you have a child in a similar situation, what criteria are you using to choose a school and if its an oversubscribed one do you have any pointers as to help them get a place.

Any advice much appreciated.

Wellthen Thu 20-Oct-11 14:22:38

I know he's only 6 but is it worth thinking about secondary - if he find long corridors and big fields difficult would he be better getting used to them at a younger age before he goes to senior school which will almost certainly be pretty big.

But, in answer to your question. When visiting I would ask schools if they currently have children with aspergers/autism and whether they have any teachers with specialisms in this area. Most schools will have had ASD children at some point but if they currently have some or have had some very recently then they have a more 'proven' track record to deal with his behaviour.

I would think about other trigger points - does he perhaps dislike noise or moving around? If so I would avoid schools which do not have carpets or where he will be required to move from room to room a lot.

Helping him get a place - hmm this one is more tricky. If you don't think he will get his diagnosis before the move then it may not make a difference. If he does, its possible that a school may 'have' to take him because of his SEN. Beyond that, from what I know there aren't any tricks to getting children in to state schools. You just have to fit the criteria which is normally catchment.

You clearly understand his needs well and have been supported by his current school. Any junior worth its salt will listen to you and ensure that his new teacher knows the adaptations he needs, so try not to worry too much about fine details. If he ends up at a school with big fields and you tell them he doesn't like them they will support him with this and find ways for him to manage anxiety.

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