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9 year old boy behavior

(32 Posts)
ilikethesun Fri 02-Sep-11 21:13:29

My son is 9.

Most of the time he is delightful helpful etc etc.

BUT at times he knows it all, tells me how to do stuff that he has no idea how to do it and also sometimes he has to comment on everything.

It is very tiring listening to him chat chat chat about rubbish some of the time.

Goodness when reading this back I sound awful, but please tell me he will grow out of this.

Whatmeworry Fri 02-Sep-11 21:14:36

Yup, at about 69 grin

StrandedBear Fri 02-Sep-11 21:15:15

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Takitezee Fri 02-Sep-11 21:15:41

He sounds like a normal child to me. He will probably grow out of it but not until he's in his 20s.

ilikethesun Fri 02-Sep-11 21:16:36

Very funny.................I am just so tired some days just listening.

Some of my friends envy me as their child tells them nothing, but mine tells me everything. When he comes home from school [oh lord] he goes through the day. On and on he said she said they did etc.............

ilikethesun Fri 02-Sep-11 21:17:11

Only used this thread as it is busy.

pictish Fri 02-Sep-11 21:17:21

Lol - my lovely 9 year old son is the same. Blah blah blahhhh.....backchat, selective hearing, the concentration span of a gnat, never shuts up.

Also now - eavesdropping. Nosy little oik. wink

Am almost looking forward to the slumpy early teens. I hope he likes his room.

ilikethesun Fri 02-Sep-11 21:19:06

eavesdropping ........................spot on he is the master, and then comments on it the next day.

KittyFane Fri 02-Sep-11 21:19:20

He's being helpful grin !

DD is 8 and has got her own opinion on everything... Which is great ... except I'm having to stop myself screaming 'you are wrong getting irritated when she insists on doing stuff in her own unique way!

ViviPru Fri 02-Sep-11 21:20:31

My nephew is the same. Its a constant stream of utter drivel. I have no idea how my SiL copes. Earplugs I don't doubt. They visited for a weekend over the summer and by the end of it I could have wrung his neck, even though on the face of it, he'd actually done nothing that was tangibly offensive.

My advice - spare you SiL (if you have one) his company till he's a bit more tolerable

ilikethesun Fri 02-Sep-11 21:21:51

ok So I have established it is a common trait so how do you all deal with it.

mrsfollowill Fri 02-Sep-11 21:27:51

You are describing my 9yo Ds perfectly! Constant chat- but selective- What I don't know about Little Big Planet / Lego / The Simpsons aint worth knowing wink.

Ask him what he did at school? 'err nothing really...'
I am also sort of looking forward to the teenage mute years.

Not really bless him!

maresedotes Fri 02-Sep-11 21:30:19

Sounds like my 9 year old daughter.

mrsfollowill Fri 02-Sep-11 21:30:20

How do I deal with it? Nod, smile and drink lots of gin once he has gone to bed.

hairfullofsnakes Fri 02-Sep-11 21:33:10

it's THREE DOTS! THREE! DAMN YOU ALL!

THREE...

ONLY THREE...

NOT HOWEVER MANY THE HELL YOU WANNA PUT...

AGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

[GRIN]

worraliberty Fri 02-Sep-11 21:33:10

All my boys did this until the age of about 12 and then I had to pull words out of their mouths lol.

And it's no use switching off and pretending to listen because they ask questions about what they'd just said hmm

MyCatHasStaff Fri 02-Sep-11 21:43:42

I've worked in classes of 8/9yo, and there are often questions over 'bullying' or children not getting along well together, but actually most of the time it's this age - they say whatever comes into their heads, there's no delay mechanism. So a child may look at another and casually remark 'you've got bad breath' or 'I don't like your xyz' or interrupt while you're telling them something to tell you you're wrong, and why, in great detail. To be honest, I enjoy this age group, they're funny in their observations, and the logic can be mind-boggling grin. If you can get past the constant background noise, and join in, they can be great fun. Try playing word association games with him, or guide the conversation into nonsense stories where you have to tell a line each. When he clams up (in about a year/18 months) you'll miss the chatter.

whackamole Fri 02-Sep-11 22:20:52

Well, I hope so! My DSS is 10 and is still in the 'I'm so smart' phase - I remember being insufferable as a child, probably up to about age 16 blush so it might last longer than you want!

herbietea Fri 02-Sep-11 22:28:35

Message withdrawn

caughtinanet Fri 02-Sep-11 22:36:35

What's the AIBU?

This sounds like normal behaviour - do you want him to stop talking or for you to be able to cope with it better?

If its the latter I'd suggest just making agreeing noises every so often and carry on with whatever you're doing.

JjandtheBeanlovesUnicorns Fri 02-Sep-11 23:05:55

DS does this already, he is four!

He also eavesdrops and comments on mine and dps whispered conversations, he's got sonar hearing, and too much to fucking say.

ilikethesun Sat 03-Sep-11 08:39:54

Thanks for all your replies and help.

Notchattingnow Sat 03-Sep-11 08:47:23

doesn't really sound like too much of a problem unless i'm missing something....

ilikethesun Sat 03-Sep-11 09:01:21

Not a prob as such just tiring I guess.

I know everything that goes on with his pals and at school so thats a positive thing.

But the constant talk of top gear cars football etc is a tad boring at times.

When we are driving it is like sitting next to Jeremy Clarkson as he knows the name and statistics of every car that goes by.

Notchattingnow Sat 03-Sep-11 19:18:35

I have a 9 yr old boy and he doesn't do this...he doesn't know lots of car statistics for a start, tho he likes to quote from The Simpsons. But mostly he is quiet or just joins in the conversation
My eldest used to dominate conversations with his favourite topics tho which would involve me also joining in ..about Pokemon or whatever and me having to appear interested .. he grew out of it thankfully hmm

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