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Tips and advice to help 6 year old have dry nights please!!

(9 Posts)
Bronte Sun 24-Jul-11 22:55:21

We're 3 weeks without pull ups and DD still needs waking up, usually twice each night to ensure a dry night. She doesn't drink before bed time but still has no signal that wakes her up to go to the loo. Last night we had 2 changes of pyjamas. Do I just persevere, trying to wake her up before I go to bed and then if I happen to wake in the early hours, check on her again? Really want to crack this during the summer holiday as broken nights are not so much of an issue when there's no school the next day.

madhattershouse Sun 24-Jul-11 22:58:47

IME it is fairly pointless doing anything! Children can only be dry when they are ready ( there is a hormone produced to stop the production of urine during sleep) before that there is little you can do other than makig work for yourself and stress for dc. Could you not use pull ups till she's ready? Not being hash btw my 6 yo has only just started to be dry by night for the last few months.

madhattershouse Sun 24-Jul-11 22:59:37

Argh...HARSH! Must be the wine grin

nolembit Sun 24-Jul-11 23:16:58

If her body is not producing ADH then nothing you do will make her dry at night. Doctors will not contemplate interfering until she is 8.

madwomanintheattic Mon 25-Jul-11 00:24:19

lifting isn't usually recommended as it only teaches them to wee in the night (and when they are half asleep). two reasons for bedwetting, either non production of the hormone (as above) or extremely deep sleep. maturity solves the first (which is why gps aren't interested at all until 7 or 8 - it's normal to bed wet until then) or meds which mimic the hormone (such as desmotabs etc - but you won't get a prescription until 7 or 8). re extremely deep sleep - some kids do produce the hormone but sleep so deeply that some urine leaks. an enuresis alarm can be used to train the body to wake if it needs to wee. (you might need to be the one that hears the qalarm and wakes the sleeper at first as some kids sleep so deeply they don't wake to the 'fire alarm' noise in their ear lol.)

so, as madhatter and nolembit say, there's no real point in doing anything. it'll happen when it happens. and lifting in the night might be delaying it, rather than helping.

usual advice is to reduce fluids in the late evening, but make sure the child is drinking loads during the day. sometimes children who don't drink enough during the day are slower to be dry at night (there's a huge thread on this somewhere, with all the sciencey bits you'll ever need... grin)

Bronte Mon 25-Jul-11 08:45:03

Thank you all for the information. Very interesting stuff. Looks as if I'll be putting pull ups back on the shopping list. And a huge tub of barrier cream as DD gets awfully bad reaction to lying in damp pull up.

ragged Mon 25-Jul-11 08:51:21

ARound here the GP will get you a bed mat alarm from age 7yo... but they are so loud they wake the whole household up. And they don't always work. So not to be tried lightly.

madwomanintheattic Mon 25-Jul-11 18:07:43

yy, the enuresis alarms are good, come in bed mat or sensor for pants (we've tried both - mat is way easier but oif course you end up changing top sheet instead of just pants.) dd1 used sensor and was dry completely and stopped using the alarm after 3 weeks. we were the ones who woke up with the alarm and then woke her up though - that's why they have to be loud lol. they are designed for use by kids who are very deep sleepers, and often they don't even hear them, so they have to be loud enough for it to wake the parents who can then rouse the child by shaking/ putting on the lights/ making a whole lot of noise etc. worked a treat for dd1 though - whereas meds had no effect at all.

madwomanintheattic Mon 25-Jul-11 18:08:08

if anyone is looking for a decent alaram , malem ones are the best btw.

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