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Eimear or Emer?

(19 Posts)
Stateofgrace Mon 24-Mar-14 12:59:28

Irish father, British mother. Child will be bought up in Ireland. What do you think of the name? Is it popular / too old fashioned? All opinions welcome.

Emubaby Mon 24-Mar-14 13:28:29

I really like it. I know one who is 10. I would spell it Eimear.

wigglesrock Mon 24-Mar-14 13:36:10

I know a few (NI), all under 5ish. I like it, the spelling is actually split right down the middle - I think I would very more towards Emer.

wigglesrock Mon 24-Mar-14 13:40:18

veer towards Emer

Pinkcustardpurplecustard Mon 24-Mar-14 14:00:18

How is it pronounced sorry?

tunnocksteacake Mon 24-Mar-14 14:01:37

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

SJisontheway Mon 24-Mar-14 14:04:02

Great name. I know of 2 baby Emer / Eimears. Both spellings perfectly good, but with British relations I would go for Emer.

Pinkcustardpurplecustard Mon 24-Mar-14 14:04:23

How is it pronounced sorry?

bridgetsmum Mon 24-Mar-14 14:08:59

It's pronounced Eemer

I prefer Eimear x

LokiTheCynicalCat Mon 24-Mar-14 14:14:02

I'd go with Eimear. Traditional names are very popular in Ireland and if she's being brought up there she will have to learn Irish and probably be taught the translation of her own name - it's simpler to go straight to the source spelling IMO (and I say that as the owner of a traditional Irish name, it's nice to see stories featuring your own name). I knew many Eimears and an Emer growing up. Lovely name.

It's pronounced "EE-mer".

Peanut14 Mon 24-Mar-14 14:19:03

I would spell it Eimear, especially if the child will be raised in Ireland. Beautiful name.

mathanxiety Tue 25-Mar-14 06:11:19

I think either version would be perfectly fine in Ireland. Maybe for the sake of the non-Irish rellies, go with Emer? I knew loads of both Emers and Eimears growing up and know of some children with the name (again, spellings vary). It has lasted really well as a name.

A lot of Irish names that you encounter really only burst upon the Irish scene in the 50s and 60s but they have 'aged' much better than other 50s and 60s names like Linda, Lorraine, Tracey, Sharon, etc. I would say with the exception of Deirdre most Irish names are still popular in Ireland, and of course spreading to the UK too after Siobhan and Sinead made a huge breakthrough in the 70s and 80s.

Stateofgrace Tue 25-Mar-14 08:41:59

Thanks all - to all the Irish speakers would there be a fada on the E? When I wiki'ed it, it seems to spell it all ways but there is a fada when spelled Éimear... anyone know?

I think the Emer spelling would be a lot easier for the Brit relatives, but I love the Eimear spelling - looks mythical... Although I think Cuchulainn's (sp?) wife spelled it Emer...

RabbitPies Tue 25-Mar-14 14:09:19

I think it's a beautiful name.
I had an Irish friend called Emer. She said it was a very old fashioned name,but she liked it.
The only trouble was that people constantly pronounced her name incorrectly. Few people got it right. No matter how often they heard it. I'm in the U.K though. I'd imagine it wouldn't be an issue in Ireland.

badtime Tue 25-Mar-14 14:23:35

I had to read the T�in B� C�ailnge (in translation) when I was at university in England. My southern lecturer and northern self were the only Irish people in the class. Every single English person pronounced 'Emer' as 'Emma'.

If you think your British relatives might do that, I would go with Eimear (even though I am more used to Emer, and prefer it).

squoosh Tue 25-Mar-14 15:35:43

I wouldn't put a fada on Eimear, surely that would mean it would then be pronounced ay-murr?

mathanxiety Tue 25-Mar-14 16:39:25

No fada on Eimear -- it would make the E a long A sound. Yes - Ay-mur (like Éamon).

The version with the fada would be much older - Éimhear - and would be pronounced Ay-ver.

Having read Badtime's post, it actually might be easier for the relatives to accept it's a lone E sound at the start (and not short like Emma) if you used the Eimear spelling

mathanxiety Tue 25-Mar-14 16:41:55

long not lone

Sillylass79 Tue 25-Mar-14 16:48:12

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

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