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How do I find a man

(48 Posts)
Dutchoma Sun 21-Sep-14 10:05:08

I would love to make a gansey like one of these. They are quite expensive to make, I guess at least £60 or £70, maybe more, depending on the size of the person you make it for, so it would have to be for someone who is prepared to get the wool. I would not charge for the knitting as I would do it for my own satisfaction. It would take at least six weeks to knit, more if it was very large.
Any ideas?

tribpot Sun 21-Sep-14 10:08:55

Looks fabulous. Could you ask your friends if any of them think their sons or husbands would want one? It would last forever and be fantastic for walking, fishing, sailing or whatever. Do you know someone who's particularly outdoorsy?

Dutchoma Sun 21-Sep-14 10:20:48

That's just it, I don't. I've just seen that the chap who does the website would charge £350 - £500 for a completed gansey and that you need 13 100g balls of wool @ £5.95 each, so it would be over £80 for the wool and postage.

Dutchoma Sun 21-Sep-14 10:21:43

And in a way I'm doing just that: asking my friends as they are all on Mumsnet.

Marcipex Mon 22-Sep-14 17:21:50

I think that's an amazing and very generous offer.

Dutchoma Mon 22-Sep-14 17:36:09

In the end I think I'm just going to go for a medium sweater and just order the wool and do it. Hopefully someone will come along and buy it off me.

Lambstales Mon 22-Sep-14 21:24:39

Stop! Stop!
I've got one. He is asleep at the moment but I know he would love it as he is really into wool, tweed and traditional methods of 'making things'.

The thing that swayed it for me was the word 'Flamborough', a little known headland north of Bridlington (where my DM grew up).

He's bigger than medium but I can't get measuring till tomorrow pm.

Dutchoma Mon 22-Sep-14 21:52:03

PM me Lambstales and I will see what I can do.

Dutchoma Mon 22-Sep-14 21:57:32

You can just measure a well fitting cardie or jumper just under where the sleeves are set in and the length of the sleeves, the rest more or less is fixed from there. You don't really need to measure the man itself.

Lambstales Mon 22-Sep-14 22:12:27

Yes, of course, good idea but I'm not going crashing round the wardrobes now..... not quite cold enough for them to be lying around on the sofa. They are all still put away.

Dutchoma Mon 22-Sep-14 22:19:56

That's fine. I have just checked out another, more traditional website in Cornwall. and they charge £24 for a full cone and £13 for a half cone. I need, According to John in Flamborough 2 1/2 cones. The postage is £7.50. It will also cost to send it to wherever you are and it will be a fairly hefty package. Unless you live near enough for me to deliver or you to collect.
Do you want a Flamborough pattern? They come with cables, hearts and allsorts. Looks interesting.

Lambstales Mon 22-Sep-14 22:25:32

It's got to be Flamborough, amazing. Don't worry blankets can be £13 postage.

Dutchoma Mon 22-Sep-14 22:26:52

I am ridiculously excited. Going to bed now.

Lambstales Mon 22-Sep-14 22:33:12

Sounds brilliant. Off up the wooden hill myself...

Marcipex Tue 23-Sep-14 14:49:29

Please show us the finished gansey, I'd love to see it.

PetulaGordino Tue 23-Sep-14 14:53:54

is it frangipani? they are great. i used their wool for a gansey for dp - it's quite rough on the hands but traditional and very warm. i designed it myself using Beth Brown-Reinsel's book and dp's measurements and i used motifs from places that were important to him

it was a labour of love i can tell you

Dutchoma Tue 23-Sep-14 15:00:21

Once I know what colour Lambstales has chosen I will order it from Cornwall, yes Frangipani. The pattern will be one of the Flamborough patterns and I will post a picture once it is done, promise. Don't look for it next week though. grin

PetulaGordino Tue 23-Sep-14 15:03:41

grin

dp's took me 9 months shock

(i was knitting other things at the same time)

Givemecaffeine21 Tue 23-Sep-14 20:31:55

Other thing is you could become a 'knitter' for a local wool shop. My friend runs a wool shop and she has knitters who make things up to demonstrate the wool, for the models in the window, or make things to order. They also finish up projects that someone has been making and ....this sounds awful...died in the process. Families apparently often bring things in and they finish them for them; it's part of their grieving process I think to have the last thing they were making and the wool shop knitters are happy to help.

Dutchoma Tue 23-Sep-14 20:43:49

It only took me a day or two to find a project on here. I have done it before and had quite enough to kep me happy (with my own knitting) for quite a while.
Very glad lambstales came along with her man to knit for. grin. we're well away.

Dutchoma Sat 29-Nov-14 08:09:50

Well, the gansey is finished and will be on its way before Christmas. It was great fun doing it and I learned an awful lot. I also made some really nice contacts.

hesterton Sat 29-Nov-14 08:15:08

Wow! Mega impressed. I have just started knitting and am struggling to make a simple scarf have straight edges.

I can't imagine ever being good enough to make something like that...

Flossyfloof Sat 29-Nov-14 08:38:13

Fabulous. Well done you!

Dutchoma Sat 29-Nov-14 08:59:24

Scarves are a pain hesterton. I usually advise people to start on a dishcloth if they start knitting from scratch. Many advantages: it doesn't matter if you drop a stitch or two, it doesn't have to have straight edges and if you manage to finish it, it will be really useful and gives you reason to be proud of yourself. A ball of dish cloth cotton costs about £1.50 and yo will get two dishcloths out of it.

hesterton Sat 29-Nov-14 09:15:54

I have committed to my scarves now! Two on the go. One rib and one raspberry stitch (I think?) I have to finish them and one more by Christmas!

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