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I posted this in vaccinations section but had no response. ...

(32 Posts)
AliGrylls Sat 11-Jul-09 18:18:47

I would therefore appreciate people's views (particularly anyone who works within the medical profession) as I don't know what to do

We have been asked to participate in a trial of a new meningitis B vaccine by our local hospital: St George's, Wandsworth. This would take the form of our son being given a "6 in 1" vaccine at 8 weeks rather than the regular "5 in 1".

The vaccine has already been administered to 392 "adults and children" (no breakdown given) as a single vaccine, with virtually no side effects. This trial is to check the safety and efficacy of the vaccine when given in concert with the other childhood vaccines.

Clearly I am reluctant to use my son as a guinea pig. On the other hand, vaccines do have to be tested and someone has to be prepared to take the (v small) risk. In addition, anyone taking part in the study would get regular check ups from a senior paediatrician which is a benefit in itself. Obviously another small upside is that, assuming one is allocated to the vaccine group (rather than the control group), my son may get protection from a dangerous strain of meningitis.

tissuesandissues Sat 11-Jul-09 18:32:04

Fuck, no.

amidaiwish Sat 11-Jul-09 18:33:54

not sure what you're asking, but no, i wouldn't agree. i am pro-vacc, BUT already think they give too much in one go so wouldn't be keen to give something else, not least an un-fully tested vaccine.

EccentricaGallumbits Sat 11-Jul-09 18:36:09

V difficult one. I have no idea what I'd do. I think I'd want to know details about the people previously given the vaccine.

I'm also really a bit unsure about giving loads of vaccines together. I have no evidence to hand but it does seem like a lot for a bdy to deal with at the same time if they have to suddenly make antibodies to 6 different diseases all together. But like I say, no evidence.

lljkk Sat 11-Jul-09 18:38:55

If it were me, I would almost certainly say yes to it. But don't do it if you don't feel comfortable. The risk of Men'gitis B is very very small, and you could end up with the placebo anyway, so only go for it if you feel confident. They will find volunteers, it doesn't have to be you.

sagacious Sat 11-Jul-09 18:39:11

Not had any experience re vaccinations ..but

When my ds was 18 months he had to have (fairly) routine surgery. The Royal London were doing a study on anasthesia and we agreed to participate (some children has an additional saline drip others just the usual procedures)

That said I would be VERY wary on vaccinations its very different to a salt water solution.

My first instinct would sadly be no.

sagacious Sat 11-Jul-09 18:39:11

Not had any experience re vaccinations ..but

When my ds was 18 months he had to have (fairly) routine surgery. The Royal London were doing a study on anasthesia and we agreed to participate (some children has an additional saline drip others just the usual procedures)

That said I would be VERY wary on vaccinations its very different to a salt water solution.

My first instinct would sadly be no.

lockets Sat 11-Jul-09 18:39:50

Message withdrawn

saintlydamemrsturnip Sat 11-Jul-09 18:40:41

If my child was at high risk from men b I would consider it (ds 2 and 3 haven't had any vaccinations just to give some background). However if my child was not in a high risk group I wouldn't touch the trial with a barge pole.

qwertpoiuy Sat 11-Jul-09 18:41:32

My DD2 was sick for 2 days after each set of vaccinations she had but she had this vaccination at 11 months old, and it was the only one she had no reaction to!

However, as for giving it to your 8-week-old son along with all the other vaccinations - I wouldn't be happy if he were mine!

Nancy66 Sat 11-Jul-09 18:43:19

I have taken part in testing as an adult - but only phase 3 and 4 testing.

Is this Phase 2?

1dilemma Sat 11-Jul-09 18:52:55

Agree I would want a lot more info (maybe you have it) is it a new vaccine or just giving current ones at different times? what is in the vaccine? what are they looking for in terms of safety eg local redness and pain or cases of meningitis etc? where else in the world gives this? why a 6 in 1? what was the breakdown of previous reactions? etc etc

PinkTulips Sat 11-Jul-09 18:53:15

in ireland they now get;

At birth BCG tuberculosis vaccine (dependant on hospital, lots don't get it)

At 2 months
6 in 1 (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping cough, Hib, Polio, Hepatitis B) and PCV (Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine)

At 4 months
6 in 1 + Men C (Meningococcal C)

At 6 months
6 in 1 + Men C + PCV

At 12 months
MMR + PCV

At 13 months
Men C + Hib

At 4 - 5 years
4 in 1 (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Whooping cough, Polio) + MMR

At 11 - 14 years
Td
Diphtheria
Tetanus

So as you can see, over here they get up to 8 at a time at a young age.

Go with your gut and do what you feel comfortable with but i just wanted to point out that 6 isn't that huge an amount in one go if that was your biggest concern

PeachyTheRiverParrettHarlot Sat 11-Jul-09 18:56:25

God, No chance

When in doubt play the worst outcome game:

worst outcome of this is who knows what, it's experimental.

thisisyesterday Sat 11-Jul-09 19:15:25

no way on earht

barnsleybelle Sat 11-Jul-09 19:19:26

I am a medical professional and so am totally into research. However, I would not allow either of my dc's to take part in any trials.

nooka Sat 11-Jul-09 19:20:09

That sounds like a small safety trial, so quite early days in the trial protocols, s I'm not totally sure I'd be happy about it. I think you need more information about the study and trials in general to understand what risk you might be subjecting your child to. I guess that's part of the issue, it's one thing joining a trial yourself, and another signing up your child.

But vaccine testing is obviously very important, and Meningitis is a very scary disease.

Do you think it could be this vaccine: news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7400593.stm
www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/4581467/A-vaccine-against-the-deadly-meningitis-B-could-be-ava ilable-within-two-years..html

2Eliza2 Sat 11-Jul-09 19:21:17

We took part in a vaccination trial starting when my daughter was about 2.

It was one of the most positive things we have ever done in our lives. I met one of the senior doctors involved by chance and he told me some of the implications for child health.

They are very, very, very careful.

Heathcliffscathy Sat 11-Jul-09 19:21:35

absolutely not.

nickytwotimes Sat 11-Jul-09 19:24:40

I would do this happily, but if you are not sure, then do not do it.

PfftTheMagicDragon Sat 11-Jul-09 19:25:05

no, no, no. I would not put my child forward for any trial like that. I would consider it for myself, but not for an 8 week old baby.

lockets Sat 11-Jul-09 19:27:10

Message withdrawn

fanjolina Sat 11-Jul-09 19:34:26

We've been asked this too. Absolutely NO WAY is my daughter taking part in any such trial.

Although I do vaccinate my children, I am very wary of it and I think we overload their bodies at such a young age without understanding the consequences.

Firawla Sat 11-Jul-09 19:50:21

I would say no. Not worth the risk

LeonieSoSleepy Sat 11-Jul-09 19:53:53

Message withdrawn

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