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to think it's ridiculous that the new nursery curriclum says kids must

(139 Posts)
furrycat Thu 04-Sep-08 08:57:18

...play outside whatever the weather?

I don't go out when it's chucking it down, so why should my kids?

My two ds play outside in tne nursery's garden twice a day. It's a mudbath so they need TWO changes of clothing a day which means the washing machine is on constantly.

I've also searched high and low for wellies but all the shops are still full of back to school shoes and the only ones I can find are £17. hmm

TheHedgeWitch Thu 04-Sep-08 09:00:20

Message withdrawn

TheHedgeWitch Thu 04-Sep-08 09:00:44

Message withdrawn

hecate Thu 04-Sep-08 09:00:51

Well, it doesn't hurt them to play outside, kids need fresh air, but it's a bit daft I agree. If you shoved your kids outside to play in the rain/hail/sleet/snow every single day, you'd probably have a visit from social services! grin

And from a practical pov, it is a pain in the arse, I agree. Maybe you can find wellies in a charity shop or on ebay?

FabioFlangeCat Thu 04-Sep-08 09:02:35

What a wanky rule.
What do they do int he summer - shove 'em out to be melanomed in 32 degree heat?

Someone with no imagination or sense has taken a guideline and made it law. the prat.

cmotdibbler Thu 04-Sep-08 09:03:16

You could get them all in one waterproofs to play in - at DS's old nursery all the mobile children had to have waterproofs and wellies to keep them clean when playing on the muddy grass. His new one has astroturf, so as long as its not actually raining, they can play without getting wet or muddy.

But I think its great for them to get out - if you wait for the ground to be dry in this country they'd never get to be outside

TheOldestCat Thu 04-Sep-08 09:03:22

furrycat - bought DD some wellies from Mothercare; they were £6 I think.

DD also gets very muddy and wet at nursery, but she loves it so I am just resigned to the extra washing!

furrycat Thu 04-Sep-08 09:16:17

Thanks for the advice - I need a size 5 for ds2 and a size 6 or 7 for ds1 and nowhere I've tried has both of those (and I daren't risk buying just for one or there will be ructions)

Ripeberry Thu 04-Sep-08 09:22:12

As a childminder the children have to be out of the house 50% of the time whatever the weather and it must not mean just letting them play in the garden!
School runs don't count, they must be out in the woods/park or just pounding the street for half the day.
Totally stupid rule, how are you supposed to fit in nap time for the babies...take them out in the rain as well!
What if the child has the sniffles? Why does the garden NOT count?
I can just see an OFSTED inspector walking around with you in the pouring rain for half the day! lol.

bloomingfedup Thu 04-Sep-08 09:24:05

I think it's a stupid rule aswell. I don't like going out in the rain really so tend to limit. It would'nt bother me if my DC pre-school did'nt follow it!

DaisySteiner Thu 04-Sep-08 09:24:32

Really Ripeberry? Do all childminders do that, cos I actually wouldn't want my children out in bad weather 50% of the time! Why is it different for childminders than pre-schools/nurseries?

bozza Thu 04-Sep-08 09:34:00

Well I'm fairly sure my CM doesn't do that! DD is with her all day today because she is not starting nursery until next Monday. So she will have to do two school runs and I know that she has planned to take her to soft play and meet up with some other CMs for lunch and into the afternoon. They will normally stay at school and play on the rec after school for up to an hour.

Ripeberry Thu 04-Sep-08 09:35:39

Because pre-schools don't have enough staff usually to keep an eye on all the kids whilst going for walks.
It is a very stupid rule, i have a big garden and whats wrong with putting them in wellies and a splash suit and letting them get on with it?
It's just a mad rule dreamt up for EYFS and i think it's dangerous as they are hardly any parks around here to go to, the playgrounds would be too wet, there would be more time spent in the car on dangerous WET roads, more chance of having accidents.
They should be inside in the warm having fun and cuddles, not freezing their little buts off! hmm

MrsMattie Thu 04-Sep-08 09:39:20

I quite like this rule. The weather in this country is shite and I'd hate to think of my 3 yr old sitting indoors all the time. I send him out in all weathers, so why not at nursery? My son's nursery ask for a spare set of clothes which we replace if it gets dirty, and they have 'nursery' raincoats and wellies which we provide at the start of term. I don't see the problem to be honest.

MrsMattie Thu 04-Sep-08 09:40:10

Oh, and they don't have to be outside, it's an option. They leave the doors open. Children can stay in if they want to.

TheFallenMadonna Thu 04-Sep-08 09:40:37

It was actually a selling point of ds's nursery for me. Outside, appropriately dressed, they loved it! I did feel sorry for the poor staff though - I don't suppose they were as keen...

LynetteScavo Thu 04-Sep-08 09:44:40

Same here fallen Madonna!

Even reception at DS's school can go out into the outdoor classroom all weathers. I've noticed the class teacher is out there during the summer, but it's the clsssroom asistant in winter grin

Fimbo Thu 04-Sep-08 09:45:09

I work in a playgroup and am dreading going back next week.

The children do enjoy being out in the rain, but we are poor and cannot afford to buy waterproofs for the children, the parents don't always provide them and usually the children come in soaking wet and need changed which takes up time which could be used for playing etc.

I catch cold easily when out in foul weather and so does another girl. If we go off sick, because we only have limited staff the playgroup would need to shut.

Last year there was a little girl crying because her fingers hurt as she was so cold. I took her inside to heat up - stuff the rules.

It is madness.

tiktok Thu 04-Sep-08 09:52:18

www.teachingexpertise.com/articles/meeting-the-challenges-of-outdoor-provision-in-the-early-years-fo undation-stage-2967 is a good article that explains the importance of learning and play outside.

They need to have the opportunity of being outside most of the time, not that they must be outside - and there are sound educational and developmental reasons why.

Adults might like being curled up in front of the fire, but young children need more than this.

Parents have to provide appropriate clothing, obviously. I don't think it's reasonable for the playgroup or nursery to have to do this.

Ripeberry Thu 04-Sep-08 09:52:28

That's another thing! Our pre-school says the outside door has to be left open, what on earth are they going to do when it's REALLY freezing, it's going to cost a fortune to heat the building sad. And what poor parent helper has the job of standing outside all morning?
Most sensible people will use their judgement and say stuff the EYFS it's too cold/nasty outside.

WatchingTheTumbleweedsPass Thu 04-Sep-08 10:04:45

It sounds quite ridiculous to me. I am all for proper outdoor 'classrooms' - nature areas, gardens, woods etc... but having to leave the door of a Reception classroom open so that the children can access the space outside of the building is not the same.

That type of 'outside' is mostly as artificial as the inside of the classroom and I cannot see what the children achieve except catching a cold because they have chosen to play with the water tray, outside, on a bitterly cold day.

It is so not the same as allowing children freedom to explore the natural environment which my generation gained from as a children when we were allowed to play outside our houses freely without supervision.

chickenmama Thu 04-Sep-08 10:26:25

I think it's a good thing this has been introduced. I went to look round a nursery for my dd the other day and they told me the kids went outside for play time for 15 minutes. The rest of the time they'd be inside. I didn't like this idea at all - at home my dd likes to be out in the garden all the time - I keep the door open most of the day so that she can go out whenever she wants to, and I'd have thought it would be similar with nursery. They have such nice outdoor equipment it seems such a waste for it only to be used for 15 mins a day. So I'm definitely going to be looking for one where they allow children to play out most of the time. As long as the kids are dressed for the weather, and want to go and play outside I don't think it's a problem.

RubyRioja Thu 04-Sep-08 10:29:20

Our pre-school has invested in all weather surfaces and canopy things which greatly extends the time they can be outside happily whether hot or cold.

When weather poor - they choose the best 15 mins or so, take them out for a blast and then make them hot chocolate when they go back in.

Heifer Thu 04-Sep-08 10:31:26

No problem this end - I have always taken DD out in bad weather, with appropriate clothing on.

Do some of you really stay in just because it is raining?

WatchingTheTumbleweedsPass Thu 04-Sep-08 10:34:37

It sounds quite ridiculous to me. I am all for proper outdoor 'classrooms' - nature areas, gardens, woods etc... but having to leave the door of a Reception classroom open so that the children can access the space outside of the building is not the same.

That type of 'outside' is mostly as artificial as the inside of the classroom and I cannot see what the children achieve except catching a cold because they have chosen to play with the water tray, outside, on a bitterly cold day.

It is so not the same as allowing children freedom to explore the natural environment which my generation gained from as a children when we were allowed to play outside our houses freely without supervision.

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