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To think parents of older children

(23 Posts)
TheHedgeWitch Wed 16-Jul-08 13:19:44

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hatrick Wed 16-Jul-08 13:22:32

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alicet Wed 16-Jul-08 13:26:16

This pisses me off too. At our local soft play I've lost count of the number of times children over 5 rampage through the under 5's bit with no consideration for the little ones. Mums in the corner having coffee and a chat totally oblivious.

Your situation sounds worse though as she could see what he was doing! GGGRRRRR!!!!

Doodle2U Wed 16-Jul-08 13:26:59

I tell them off myself - bollocks to waiting for the actual parent to do it, if my kids are in danger of being hurt! Then I bollock the parents, when i can find themgrin

That said, once had a situation where a kid with ADHD was actually protecting my DS from other kids who were being horrid (they were about 9 or 10 and my DS was 3 or 4 at the time). The Mum with the kid with ADHD came over and asked me if it was her son causing problems because sometimes he did - explained her little guy was helping my DS and was being brilliant - and she cried!!! But in a good way grin

TheHedgeWitch Wed 16-Jul-08 13:30:12

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Kimi Wed 16-Jul-08 13:42:21

Love mothers like that THW the ones that sit there going no no darling do not throttle that child.

Did you report him the the staff?

bonnibaby Wed 16-Jul-08 13:42:49

YANBU
I tell them myself if they are endangering my child,nicely but firmly.

Cant believe he threw balls at you when you told him ,brat!

TheHedgeWitch Wed 16-Jul-08 13:43:35

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Kimi Wed 16-Jul-08 14:03:10

I would have gone and ask the mother to remove him tbh

itati Wed 16-Jul-08 14:04:16

Maybe they watch their own child less as they are older and more capapble? Not thinking about small babies, obviously.

ftg Wed 16-Jul-08 14:10:43

YANBU definately not, if the staff wasn't listened to then where is the discipline...am i right in thinking that at some point there should be accountability somewhere if other kids are being affected? Am I being too severe saying staff should throw them out if one child is affecting the others?

TheHedgeWitch Wed 16-Jul-08 14:40:39

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TheHedgeWitch Wed 16-Jul-08 20:13:18

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ScummyMummy Wed 16-Jul-08 20:27:31

tbh, i often feel minorly peeved when there are tiny toddlers in the older bit forcing the bigger kids to slow down and be careful when part of the reason for these places is for kids to bomb about letting off steam without having to worry about tripping over babies. It's like our local adventure playground, clearly marked as for over 5s only, which always has some barely walking baby being led at a snails pace along the equipment with mummy and daddy holding either hand and a bottleneck of older kids forced to shuffle behind them unable to overtake. However, this kid sounds like he was deliberately targeting the little ones, which is quite a different thing and not on at all and his mum/dad/carer should have sorted it out. I think complaining to staff is the best thing to do in those circumstances.

herbgarden Wed 16-Jul-08 20:28:30

I usually check out the mother of the child before I have a go (I've seen some scary looking mothers around !) and then give the child a "how old are you" question and then tell them to get out......
So far it's worked but sounds like you might have been up against a not particularly nice child......some I think are just a bit boisterous and don't realise until you tell them others just don't care do they....

Twiglett Wed 16-Jul-08 20:31:54

well IME it is unusual for 7 or 8 year olds to be anything other than caring for toddlers.

But I also agree with what Scrummymummy says if they are in the over 5 area then it is the duty of the parents of the toddlers to ensure their children's safety.

I also may have considered that the 7 or 8 year old had beahvioural or special needs. It is unusual for a child of this age to respond agressively to a strange adult.

TheHedgeWitch Wed 16-Jul-08 21:08:37

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ScummyMummy Thu 17-Jul-08 09:26:11

I think that's a bit different then and just the chance you take if you choose to go into the older kids bit. I never supervise my kids (now 9) closely in that kind of environment, tbh, and haven't for some years. I only intervene if I hear outraged squawks that seem to be coming from their direction. I think the onus was on you as the parent with the baby in the big kids bit to supervise the baby just as you did. It also sounds like you are a lovely kid magnet type of person and need to practice being more boring!

WilfSell Thu 17-Jul-08 09:28:16

YANBU I have a 9 year old and if he behaved like that around little ones, I'd be furious with him. But I wouldn't be sitting in the corner drinking tea and ignoring him TBH.

Speak to the mother first, and politely ask if she could ask him to leave because he's upsetting the little ones and if she won't, go tell him yourself...

cornsilk Thu 17-Jul-08 09:29:55

This always happens in soft play areas. I can't bear them - my ds2 is especially big for his age and always gets dagger like looks from parents of young chn if he goes anywhere near the little ones. I haven't taken ds2 since he was about 3 (except for a party) for that reason.

WilfSell Thu 17-Jul-08 09:30:58

I suppose if the toddlers were in the general older kids' bit then it's really up to the parents of the little ones to move them somewhere a bit less hectic. Big kids do need to let off steam as others have said but still, I'd hope my son would behave kindly...

TheHedgeWitch Sat 19-Jul-08 07:28:26

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jimjamshaslefttheyurt Sat 19-Jul-08 07:47:05

What bigger children aren't allowed in the big area at all during the day? That's a weird set up.

I wouldn't allow my 6 year old in a toddler area, but I don't supervise him on the big equipment. I would expect anyone leaving their toddler in the big area to do so at their own risk tbh (and provide the supervision). My 3 year old refuses to go into the toddler area so I supervise him in the big bit.

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