Told to lose weight by midwife

(168 Posts)
Paradii Wed 01-Dec-21 11:06:13

My BMI is 26 so I am classed as overweight.

I train horses for my job so I have a lot of muscle mass, especially in my legs. I have a flat stomach and definitely don't look overweight. I told her this but she insisted that I'm overweight and should aim to eat less calories/ more healthily.

Aibu to think I shouldn't try to lose weight, particularly when pregnant?

OP’s posts: |
Mrbob Wed 01-Dec-21 11:08:25

BMI of 26. I would have laughed at her

Girliefriendlikespuppies Wed 01-Dec-21 11:09:31

I'd tell her to f**k off.

So rude.

Carry on and definitely don't eat less!!

coffy11 Wed 01-Dec-21 11:09:44

Ignore her. BMI means nothing.

BernadetteRostankowskiWolowitz Wed 01-Dec-21 11:10:26

There is nothing wrong with following a sensible weight loss plan if required when pregnant. I'm not particularly a fan of the Slimming World method, but I think it's been established as suitable if overweight and pregnant.

However if you already eat sensibly and exercise, then I wouldn't pay any real attention to a BMI of 26. It's pretty much only just in the Overweight category and I dont think should be used in isolation as a tool.

Technically she is right - the BMI means overweight, and following a healthy diet when pregnant is also fine.

But you dont actually have to do anything here, if you feel you lead a healthy lifestyle.

shouldistop Wed 01-Dec-21 11:11:19

Even obese women shouldn't aim to lose weight in pregnancy, the aim would be to remain the same.

My bmi was higher than 26 when I was pregnant with ds2 and no one said anything to me. I believe if it's over 30 it becomes an issue.

DaisyNGO Wed 01-Dec-21 11:11:31

BernadetteRostankowskiWolowitz

There is nothing wrong with following a sensible weight loss plan if required when pregnant. I'm not particularly a fan of the Slimming World method, but I think it's been established as suitable if overweight and pregnant.

However if you already eat sensibly and exercise, then I wouldn't pay any real attention to a BMI of 26. It's pretty much only just in the Overweight category and I dont think should be used in isolation as a tool.

Technically she is right - the BMI means overweight, and following a healthy diet when pregnant is also fine.

But you dont actually have to do anything here, if you feel you lead a healthy lifestyle.

Did you completely miss the point about muscle mass?

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BernadetteRostankowskiWolowitz Wed 01-Dec-21 11:14:03

No, I can read thank you. I said the OP clearly follows an active and healthy lifestyle so doesnt actually need to do anything with the MWs comments.

But I also pointed out, in general terms, that following a healthy diet is perfectly fine when pregnant and overweight.

Scottishskifun Wed 01-Dec-21 11:16:36

A BMI graph is a load of rubbish it's not accurate and doesn't factor in things like muscle mass. Most medical professionals will say its a tool but isn't a accurate reflection.
It's also not accurate in any way shape or form. The o ly way to accurately measure BMI is by dunking people in a tank and using muscle mass but obviously this costs money compared to let's divide your weight by your height!

Ignore the midwife your not overweight! As long as your eating a balanced diet as much as possible and exercising (sounds like you are) then there is no issue!

TrueGrit54 Wed 01-Dec-21 11:20:36

Ignore your midwife on this one. As you are fit and have good muscles BMI doesn’t work for you. Just carry on as you are, if it becomes an issue change midwives.

My DH is always in the very over weight category, he is a rugby build, neck is 19 inches, legs and arms big muscles, broad chest. He works out 6 days a week and is very fit. I on the other hand am all wobbly tummy, very soft, handfuls of blubber but never go over 25 on the BMI so technically am fine. I am so not fine. Unfortunately health professionals are a bit hit and miss.

Hope you enjoy your pregnancy.

PurpleDaisies Wed 01-Dec-21 11:21:41

Some midwives are an absolute law unto themselves. Even if you were overweight, the advice isn’t to diet. It’s to eat healthily and exercise. A bmi of 26 is borderline anyway.

www.nhs.uk/pregnancy/related-conditions/existing-health-conditions/overweight/

Viviennemary Wed 01-Dec-21 11:22:49

I would ask for a different midwife. What an idiot.

Aussiegirl123456 Wed 01-Dec-21 11:23:39

I would have eaten the midwife

Teacupsandtoast Wed 01-Dec-21 11:29:17

Tell her to fuck off. Seriously. And refuse to be weighed again - you are well within your rights to do so

rrhuth Wed 01-Dec-21 11:36:14

I would ask for a change of midwife and list this as the reason why.

Unacceptable to have to receive people's personal baggage/opinions instead of NHS approved medical/scientific/policy guidance.

TheOrigRights Wed 01-Dec-21 11:38:13

coffy11

Ignore her. BMI means nothing.

That's not true.

RosesAndHellebores Wed 01-Dec-21 11:38:56

I have never heard any other human being spout as much claptrap as many midwives. There are some hidden gems but they manage to remain well hidden.

irishfarmer Wed 01-Dec-21 11:39:22

That is ridiculous!! BMI is only one tool a health professional should use to indicate if someone is under/ over weight. I'm also pregnant and was with my GP last week. I asked her about weight . And said "My BMI is slightly over (also 26) starting out in pregnancy is that ok" she looked at me and said "BMI is only a starting guide, you are clearly not overweight"
Don't mind that midwife. By the sound of it you are very fit and healthy

HyphenCobra Wed 01-Dec-21 11:39:31

BMI is so hit and miss!! Can't be taken by itself soley to determine someone's health or lack, there-of.

Thelnebriati Wed 01-Dec-21 11:40:52

JFC thats terrible advice, you couldn't safely do your job if you were unfit.

TheOrigRights Wed 01-Dec-21 11:42:42

Scottishskifun

A BMI graph is a load of rubbish it's not accurate and doesn't factor in things like muscle mass. Most medical professionals will say its a tool but isn't a accurate reflection.
It's also not accurate in any way shape or form. The o ly way to accurately measure BMI is by dunking people in a tank and using muscle mass but obviously this costs money compared to let's divide your weight by your height!

Ignore the midwife your not overweight! As long as your eating a balanced diet as much as possible and exercising (sounds like you are) then there is no issue!

Unless the OP is an olympic gymnast or weight lifter, the range for a healthy BMI already does take into account muscle mass and differences in frame etc.

If people want to explain away them being overweight with the muscle mass argument, then that's their choice but it is unlikely to ne true. It is likely that the OP is overweight.

Did the midwife actually tell you to lose weight, or just to try and eat more healthily?

PerfectlyUnsuitable Wed 01-Dec-21 11:42:51

BernadetteRostankowskiWolowitz

There is nothing wrong with following a sensible weight loss plan if required when pregnant. I'm not particularly a fan of the Slimming World method, but I think it's been established as suitable if overweight and pregnant.

However if you already eat sensibly and exercise, then I wouldn't pay any real attention to a BMI of 26. It's pretty much only just in the Overweight category and I dont think should be used in isolation as a tool.

Technically she is right - the BMI means overweight, and following a healthy diet when pregnant is also fine.

But you dont actually have to do anything here, if you feel you lead a healthy lifestyle.

I personally think that pregnancy is the last time when you want to loose weight. And that's even before you have the discussion about BMI and whether it's relevant to the OP or not.

Lorw Wed 01-Dec-21 11:42:58

I had a booking BMI of 35 and not once was I told to lose weight, she did mention that i had a high BMI and the risks of that but apart from that 🤷🏻‍♀️ My BMI is 38 now and I’m 39 weeks so 😂

I’d request a new midwife...🤨

Dentistlakes Wed 01-Dec-21 11:44:21

BMI is a useful tool, but it needs to be applied with some common sense. A BMI of 26 in someone who is clearly fit is not something I would be concerned about. I would just ignore your midwife on this one op. Of course eating healthily is a good idea but I wouldn’t focus on losing weight.

PurpleDaisies Wed 01-Dec-21 11:45:19

I personally think that pregnancy is the last time when you want to loose weight.

You don’t really need to “personally think” anything. There is plenty of actual medical advice from the nhs and other reputable sources saying not to diet in pregnancy. Heathy eating and staying active are good things.

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