workplace stuff

(9 Posts)
SiempreDot Fri 26-Nov-21 23:15:16

Prior to covid, we were on a work place leadership scheme. A colleague was pregnant at the time and decided not to complete it, as there was a time limit to complete all sessions.

My college went on mat leave in Feb 2021 and then the pandemic hit and the course was discontinued. She has now come back to work and the scheme has started again.

She happened to mention to our line manager that she'd like to take part in the training and our line manager said he didn't think that would be appropriate because she seems to focussed on being a mother and it wouldnt be suitable for her.

This isn't even my argument to have, but I know you raise grievances about issues not people. I want to do this, not just on my colleagues behalf, bust also because I am managed by this person too, and I dont accept that this is ok. I find it completely discriminatory. I just wondered what the consensus was? Its not my issue personally, but I am managed by him, and greivance policy says that its more about the issue, not the person. Any comments please

OP’s posts: |
VillanellesOrangeCoat Sat 27-Nov-21 02:24:06

It’s definitely discriminatory and yes you can (and should) raise it. If you have a union they can do it on your behalf if you don’t want to do it yourself.

Newrumpus Sat 27-Nov-21 07:42:49

Oh dear! Someone will be in trouble unless there is a quick change of mind.

Nomorecoco Sat 27-Nov-21 08:42:00

Is there a whilstblower process?

Its definitely discrimination and proof that why new mums aren't able to progress as much as men, riled me up hearing this!

Aprilx Sat 27-Nov-21 08:46:55

Nomorecoco

Is there a whilstblower process?

Its definitely discrimination and proof that why new mums aren't able to progress as much as men, riled me up hearing this!

Whistleblowing has a specific meaning in employment law and it does not apply here. Whistleblowing never applies to personal grievances including discriminatory ones.

This is, as OP mentioned, a matter for the grievance procedure not the whistleblowing procedure.

SolasAnla Sat 27-Nov-21 09:10:02

2 issues
1) the time constraint on finishing is possible direct discrimination as the other staff member appears to have withdrawn due to pregnancy / maternity leave acting as a barrier to success.

I presume her withdrawal was not an "I'm preggers so I don't want to be a manager" announcement?

2) your manager was placing a barrier to her accessing the course as a direct result of her pregnancy/ sex status.

Is the manager a parent?
How many parents f/m and non parents f/m is he managing?

Small but
Did you hear the conversation yourself or was it summarised to you by the woman?
If it was a summary you could walk yourself into a HR mess of "he said, you were not there".

MrsPinkCock Sat 27-Nov-21 09:43:41

It is potentially discriminatory, yes. And of course you raise grievances about people as well as issues so I’m not sure what the policy is talking about.

But it’s not your issue to raise, is it? Grievances are usually a result of issues with your own treatment or contract. Chances are they will ask the “victim” if she wants to take it any further, she will say no, and it will be dropped.

She always has the option to raise it herself, but honestly I’d think it was a little odd if you tried to raise it on her behalf.

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SolasAnla Sat 27-Nov-21 10:58:00

MrsPinkCock

It is potentially discriminatory, yes. And of course you raise grievances about people as well as issues so I’m not sure what the policy is talking about.

But it’s not your issue to raise, is it? Grievances are usually a result of issues with your own treatment or contract. Chances are they will ask the “victim” if she wants to take it any further, she will say no, and it will be dropped.

She always has the option to raise it herself, but honestly I’d think it was a little odd if you tried to raise it on her behalf.

Can you think of any time when the opinion that its not appropriate for a woman who had a baby to be a manager is not an issue for women in a workplace?

Shamoo Sat 27-Nov-21 11:03:13

Despite what the person above says, if your business offers a whistleblowing service (phone hotline etc) then you could use this and they will investigate it under their standard HR processes. It may not legally be a technical whistleblow but certainly at my work it would be covered by our policy (which covers bullying, harassment, discrimination etc)

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