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To ask another dummy question about title plans/boundaries?

(15 Posts)
Cherrysoup Thu 21-Jan-21 16:12:43

The bank/mortgage company has the deeds as we’re paying a mortgage on it, didn’t buy it outright, I wish! The example of another property I looked up didn’t give any idea of who owns the boundary to the right as I walk into the garden. Will this be on the deeds? It’s a bit pointless buying the title plan as they don’t tend to show boundary responsibility, do they? The land registry example doesn’t, nor does a different property I looked up.

OP’s posts: |
justanotherremainer Thu 21-Jan-21 16:57:50

Where is the property?Scotland? England? Australia?

Red2017 Thu 21-Jan-21 17:44:21

If its in England you would need to get either the conveyance deed or transfer. Boundaries with T marks are most likely on the conveyance, however there is no guarantee.

Cherrysoup Thu 21-Jan-21 21:46:06

Thanks, think I’m just going to replace, neighbour is pensioner and we’re not. I guess it doesn’t really matter who it belongs to.

OP’s posts: |
Pinkfreesias Thu 21-Jan-21 21:51:02

I always thought that, looking out from inside the house, the boundary on the left hand side is yours, was a rough guide to working it out.

Gogglebox20 Thu 21-Jan-21 21:54:55

I agree @Pinkfreesias
If you stand and look at the front of your property from the road side, you are responsible for any boundary to the left of that. It should be marked on your house deeds with a T.
However, you can pay for and replace any boundary (discuss with your neighbour first) as long as you stay in the boundary lines or bring to your side of the boundary.

justanotherremainer Thu 21-Jan-21 22:26:51

OMG OP the usual duff legal MN legal advice, please ignore.

Speak to the solicitor who acted for you the you bought the house. They will give you a copy of the title deed and plan. Simple.

Cherrysoup Thu 21-Jan-21 22:32:27

I have title deed and plan, no t symbols. Gonna ask for the conveyance deed and look in the original pack from the solicitor, but just as quick and easy for me to sort it, given neighbour is on a ‘fixed income’.

To pp, I wish it were that simple! If you maintain a boundary, you are then responsible for it, so it’s a bit tricky and not that straightforward.

OP’s posts: |
SpamIAm Thu 21-Jan-21 22:37:28

Is it not in the text somewhere in your deeds? Ours are shared responsibility, there's nothing marked on the plans.

IggyFigs Thu 21-Jan-21 22:40:37

It might be on the deeds i.e. any old conveyances or transfers (not the title register or plan) but there is no guarantee that it will be unfortunately.

BruceAndNosh Thu 21-Jan-21 22:40:50

Gogglebox20

I agree @Pinkfreesias
If you stand and look at the front of your property from the road side, you are responsible for any boundary to the left of that. It should be marked on your house deeds with a T.
However, you can pay for and replace any boundary (discuss with your neighbour first) as long as you stay in the boundary lines or bring to your side of the boundary.

Nope.
We have shared boundaries on all four sides of our property and annoyingly, responsible for ALL of them

justanotherremainer Thu 21-Jan-21 22:46:00

The left hand side thing is total guff, i'm afraid.

PP may have lived in a house where that was correct, but in general terms it's total guff.

Sorry to be rude but PP need to be careful about the advice they give people.

MaggieFS Thu 21-Jan-21 22:54:17

I can't believe people are still peddling that left side/right side guff.

Just wait a few minutes OP, and someone will be along to tell you if you look out at the back/wrong side of the fence then it's yours.

thereisonlyoneofme Fri 22-Jan-21 11:10:27

How do you tell which is yours then

MaggieFS Fri 22-Jan-21 14:04:41

When you start the purchase process your solicitor requests a copy of the title deeds and plans form the Land Registry. Hopefully, you'll receive a plan with small T marks which indicate your fences/walls. If not, they may well be described in writing in the deeds. And failing that, there may be some other old documentation. Sometimes though, especially with older properties it just isn't possible to work out, so it comes down to whomever is keen for their to be repairs or maintenance, is willing to pay and so on. Hopefully amicably but often not so.

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