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To say I'm half Irish

(580 Posts)
Winederlust Sat 23-May-20 01:15:36

Just wanted to settle a petty argument between DH and I.
I was born in England. As was my mum. My dad also. However both his parents were born in ROI. They moved to the UK as young adults and met, married and settled with a family in England.
I think that, although my dad was born in England, he is full blooded Irish. Which in turn makes me half Irish. My DH reckons I'm quarter at best.
Not a big deal in the grand scheme of things but just interested in the general MN population's thoughts?

coldlighthappier Sat 23-May-20 01:17:27

How does he work that one out? 😂

inwood Sat 23-May-20 01:18:28

Quarter at best.

SwedishEdith Sat 23-May-20 01:18:34

Apply for an Irish passport. That'll really blow his mind.

Sparklfairy Sat 23-May-20 01:20:55

I have the exact same family tree OP. I'm half Irish! Quarter at best indeed grin

TitianaTitsling Sat 23-May-20 01:21:32

Id agree with DH you're a quarter

Donkeytail Sat 23-May-20 01:22:11

I'm kind of with your husband. Your Dad was British born so I'd call him British not Irish no matter what blood you think he has.

Euclid Sat 23-May-20 01:22:36

Message deleted by MNHQ. Here's a link to our Talk Guidelines.

ArriettyJones Sat 23-May-20 01:22:46

My DH reckons I'm quarter at best.

Eh? Does he think it’s a freestyle scoring system? confused

PastMyBestBeforeDate Sat 23-May-20 01:23:17

Yes genetically you are half Irish.
My db and I are both half <nationality> despite being born in different countries.

ArriettyJones Sat 23-May-20 01:23:54

Id agree with DH you're a quarter

Can you show your workings out?

StayinginSummer Sat 23-May-20 01:24:04

If someone’s parents are Irish and Indian, they’d say they were half Irish and half Indian wouldn’t they?

Both my parents are Irish, but I was born in England. To be honest, I just say my parents are Irish. As saying ‘I’m Irish or half Irish’ doesn’t feel right!

dalrympy Sat 23-May-20 01:24:05

That's tricky.

All four of my grandparents were from the same European country. My mum was also born there but my dad was born in the UK.

What does that make me? By your reckoning I'm 100% from that country (which I am if you think blood) but surely I'm a bit British?

DontStandSoCloseToMe Sat 23-May-20 01:27:33

One of my paternal grandparents was Scottish, one of my maternal grandparents is Irish, both of my parents were born and raised in England, I wouldn't dream of saying I was half Scottish or Irish it seems odd to me. A bit like Americans who say they're Irish because their great great uncle twice removed's dog was born in kennels on the outskirts of Longford...

Deadringer Sat 23-May-20 01:28:35

Genetically you are half irish but surely your dad is british, so that muddies the waters i think.

TheDropBear Sat 23-May-20 01:28:40

I think where you consider yourself to be from is quite a personal thing, is it where your parents are from, where you were born or where you were raised?
I'd personally say that you have Irish heritage rather than being half Irish but I don't think either answer is wrong just placing different levels of importance on things.

ArriettyJones Sat 23-May-20 01:30:59

All four of my grandparents were from the same European country. My mum was also born there but my dad was born in the UK.

What does that make me? By your reckoning I'm 100% from that country (which I am if you think blood) but surely I'm a bit British?

Mine’s nowhere near that simple, but I either talk in terms of heritage or nationality/heritage combination.

So (fictional example) I might describe myself as “half Spanish, half Italian” (my heritage). Or I might call myself “English/Spanish/Italian,” (my identity).

Does that not feel natural to you?

Euclid Sat 23-May-20 01:34:34

Don't Stand you are 25 per cent Scottish and 25 per cent Irish. You did not say where your other two grandparents are from, so I cannot comment on what your other 50 per cent is.

Where you were born is entirely irrelevant. Just suppose that all your grandparents were English and that your parents happened to be in eg Australia when you were born, that would not make you Australian.

Donkeytail Sat 23-May-20 01:35:33

If someone’s parents are Irish and Indian, they’d say they were half Irish and half Indian wouldn’t they?

But her dad is British not Irish.

SwedishEdith Sat 23-May-20 01:35:51

A bit like Americans who say they're Irish because their great great uncle twice removed's dog was born in kennels on the outskirts of Longford...

Except it's not.

Yeahnahmum Sat 23-May-20 01:37:34

If your dad's 100% Irish that would mean you would be 50% Irish. If his parents were half Irish half something else, this would mean you are a quarter Irish

serenada Sat 23-May-20 01:40:02

I disagree @Euclid because where you are born can be a factor for citizenship.

For example, your example of a couple on holiday (let us say from Oz to the UK) have the baby in London - baby can get UK citizenship as born here. Citizenship by birthplace isn't recognised everywhere - I think Ireland removed it several years ago but it is still in place in the UK.

IPityThePontipines Sat 23-May-20 01:40:22

Half Irish like me.

You can get citizenship, but if you want to pass it on to any future children, you have to get it before they are born.

Donkeytail Sat 23-May-20 01:41:15

Where you were born is entirely irrelevant. Just suppose that all your grandparents were English and that your parents happened to be in eg Australia when you were born, that would not make you Australian.

See I'd agree with this maybe if you were just born in Aus and moved back to Englad soon after but not of you were born and raised in Aus.
Her Dad was born and raised in England. He is culturally British as well as being born there. There has been lots of migration to Ireland in the past 20 years or so, lots of first generation Irish. I would never dream of 'correcting' the kid down the road and saying he isn't Irish, he is Nigerian because that is where his parents are from. He was born here, raised here, he is Irish.

ILikeSardines Sat 23-May-20 01:44:45

This is s sensitive topic.

You're half second generation Irish on your dad's side.

However, cultural heritage is important.

You can identify however you want. In reality I wouldn't say you were half Irish as both your parents were born in England.

It's up to you though, there's no 'right' answer imo

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